22 Works

Data from: A universal mechanism generating clusters of differentiated loci during divergence-with-migration

Marina Rafajlović, Anna Emanuelsson, Kerstin Johannesson, Roger K. Butlin & Bernhard Mehlig
Genome-wide patterns of genetic divergence reveal mechanisms of adaptation under gene flow. Empirical data show that divergence is mostly concentrated in narrow genomic regions. This pattern may arise because differentiated loci protect nearby mutations from gene flow, but recent theory suggests this mechanism is insufficient to explain the emergence of concentrated differentiation during biologically realistic timescales. Critically, earlier theory neglects an inevitable consequence of genetic drift: stochastic loss of local genomic divergence. Here, we demonstrate...

Data from: Divergence within and among seaweed siblings (Fucus vesiculosus and F. radicans) in the Baltic Sea

Angelica Ardehed, Daniel Johansson, Lisa Sundqvist, Ellen Schagerström, Zuzanna Zagrodzka, Nikolaj A. Kovaltchouk, Lena Bergström, Lena Kautsky, Marina Rafajlovic, Ricardo T. Pereyra & Kerstin Johannesson
Closely related taxa provide significant case studies for understanding evolution of new species but may simultaneously challenge species identification and definition. In the Baltic Sea, two dominant and perennial brown algae share a very recent ancestry. Fucus vesiculosus invaded this recently formed postglacial sea 8000 years ago and shortly thereafter Fucus radicans diverged from this lineage as an endemic species. In the Baltic Sea both species reproduce sexually but also recruit fully fertile new individuals...

Data from: Testosterone activates sexual dimorphism including male-typical carotenoid but not melanin plumage pigmentation in a female bird

Willow R. Lindsay, Douglas G. Barron, Michael S. Webster & Hubert Schwabl
In males it is frequently testosterone (T) that activates the expression of sexually selected morphological and behavioral displays, but the role of T in regulating similar traits in females is less clear. Here we combine correlational data with results from T and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) manipulations in both sexes to assess the role of T in mediating sexually dimorphic coloration and morphology in the red-backed fairy-wren (Malurus melanocephalus). We show that (1) natural variation in...

Data from: Population structure in Atlantic cod in the eastern North Sea-Skagerrak-Kattegat: early life stage dispersal and adult migration

Carl André, Henrik Svedäng, Halvor Knutsen, Geir Dahle, Patrik Jonsson, Anna-Karin Ring, Mattias Sköld & Per Erik Jorde
Background: In marine fish species, where pelagic egg and larvae drift with ocean currents, population structure has been suggested to be maintained by larval retention due to hydrographic structuring and by homing of adult fish to natal areas. Whilst natal homing of adults has been demonstrated for anadromous and coral reef fishes, there are few documented examples of philopatric migration in temperate marine fish species. Results: Here, we demonstrate temporally stable genetic differentiation among spawning...

Data from: The story of a hitchhiker: population genetic patterns in the invasive barnacle Balanus (Amphibalanus) improvisus Darwin 1854

Anna-Lisa Wrange, Gregory Charrier, Anne Thonig, Magnus Alm Rosenblad, Anders Blomberg, Jonathan N. Havenhand, Per R. Jonsson & Carl André
Understanding the ecological and evolutionary forces that determine the genetic structure and spread of invasive species is a key component of invasion biology. The bay barnacle, Balanus improvisus (= Amphibalanus improvisus), is one of the most successful aquatic invaders worldwide, and is characterised by broad environmental tolerance. Although the species can spread through natural larval dispersal, human-mediated transport through (primarily) shipping has almost certainly contributed to the current global distribution of this species. Despite its...

Data from: Oral microflora in preschool children attending a fluoride varnish program: a cross-sectional study

Maria Anderson, Margaret Grindefjord, Göran Dahllöf, Gunnar Dahlén & Svante Twetman
Background: To compare the oral microflora in preschool children attending a fluoride varnish program with a reference group receiving a standard oral health program without fluoride varnish applications. A second aim was to relate the microbial composition to the caries prevalence. Methods: Five hundred seven 3-year-old children were enrolled from a cohort of 3403 preschool children taking part in a community based oral health project. Two hundred sixty-three of them had attended caries-preventive program with...

Data from: The influence of balanced and imbalanced resource supply on biodiversity-functioning relationship across ecosystems

Aleksandra M. Lewandowska, Antje Biermann, Elizabeth T. Borer, Miguel A. Cebrian-Piqueras, Steven A. J. Declerck, Luc De Meester, Ellen Van Donk, Lars Gamfeldt, Daniel S. Gruner, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Kevin P. Kirkman, Christopher A. Klausmeier, Michael Kleyer, Johannes M. H. Knops, Pieter Lemmens, Eric M. Lind, Elena Litchman, Jasmin Mantilla-Contreras, Koen Martens, Sandra Meier, Vanessa Minden, Joslin L. Moore, Harry Olde Venterink, Eric W. Seabloom … & Helmut Hillebrand
Numerous studies show that increasing species richness leads to higher ecosystem productivity. This effect is often attributed to more efficient portioning of multiple resources in communities with higher numbers of competing species, indicating the role of resource supply and stoichiometry for biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships. Here, we merged theory on ecological stoichiometry with a framework of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning to understand how resource use transfers into primary production. We applied a structural equation model to define patterns...

Data from: Targeted resequencing reveals geographical patterns of differentiation for loci implicated in parallel evolution

Anja M. Westram, Marina Panova, Juan Galindo & Roger K. Butlin
Parallel divergence and speciation provide evidence for the role of divergent selection in generating biological diversity. Recent studies indicate that parallel phenotypic divergence may not have the same genetic basis in different geographical locations - “outlier loci” (loci potentially affected by divergent selection) are often not shared among parallel instances of phenotypic divergence. However, limited sharing may be due, in part, to technical issues if false positive outliers occur. Here, we test this idea in...

Data from: Are red bishops red enough? On the persistence of a generalized receiver bias in Euplectes

Calum E. Ninnes, Stacey L. Webb & Staffan Andersson
In the genus Euplectes (17 species of widowbirds and bishops), red carotenoid-based coloration has been found to function in male contest competition over territories and appears to exploit a generalized receiver bias by which redder (more longwave) hues are perceived as more aversive or intimidating. A major piece missing, however, is that among the 5 most extensively red species, forming the clade of “red bishops,” the agonistic function has remained unexplored or undetected. Moreover, does...

Data from: A phenological shift in the time of recruitment of the shipworm, Teredo navalis L., mirrors marine climate change

Christin Appelqvist & Jonathan N. Havenhand
For many species, seasonal changes in key environmental variables such as food availability, light, and temperature drive the timing (“phenology”) of major life-history events. Extensive evidence from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine habitats shows that global warming is changing the timings of many biological events; however, few of these studies have investigated the effects of climate change on the phenology of larval recruitment in marine invertebrates. Here, we studied temperature-related phenological shifts in the breeding season...

Data from: The abiotic and biotic drivers of rapid diversification in Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae)

Laura P. Lagomarsino, Fabien L. Condamine, Alexandre Antonelli, Andreas Mulch & Charles C. Davis
The tropical Andes of South America, the world’s richest biodiversity hotspot, are home to many rapid radiations. While geological, climatic, and ecological processes collectively explain such radiations, their relative contributions are seldom examined within a single clade. We explore the contribution of these factors by applying a series of diversification models that incorporate mountain building, climate change, and trait evolution to the first dated phylogeny of Andean bellflowers (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae). Our framework is novel for...

Data from: A linkage map and QTL analysis for pyrethroid resistance in the bed bug Cimex lectularius

Toby Fountain, Mark Ravinet, Richard Naylor, Klaus Reinhardt & Roger K. Butlin
The rapid evolution of insecticide resistance remains one of the biggest challenges in the control of medically and economically important pests. Insects have evolved a diverse range of mechanisms to reduce the efficacy of the commonly used classes of insecticides and finding the genetic basis of resistance is a major aid to management. In a previously unstudied population, we performed an F2 resistance mapping cross for the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, for which insecticide...

Data from: Effects of experimental warming on biodiversity depend on ecosystem type and local species composition

Daniel S. Gruner, Matthew E. S. Bracken, Stella A. Berger, Britas Klemens Eriksson, Lars Gamfeldt, Birte Matthiessen, Stefanie Moorthi, Ulrich Sommer & Helmut Hillebrand
Climatic warming is a primary driver of change in ecosystems worldwide. Here, we synthesize responses of species richness and evenness from 187 experimental warming studies in a quantitative meta-analysis. We asked 1) whether effects of warming on diversity were detectable and consistent across terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems, 2) if effects on diversity correlated with intensity, duration, and experimental unit size of temperature change manipulations, and 3) whether these experimental effects on diversity interacted with...

Data from: Selection and constraints on offspring size-number trade-offs in sand lizards (Lacerta agilis)

Gabriella Ljungström, Martin Stjernstedt, Erik Wapstra & Mats Olsson
The trade-off between offspring size and number is a central component of life-history theory, postulating that larger investment into offspring size inevitably decreases offspring number. This trade-off is generally discussed in terms of genetic, physiological or morphological constraints; however, as among-individual differences can mask individual trade-offs, the underlying mechanisms may be difficult to reveal. In this study, we use multivariate analyses to investigate whether there is a trade-off between offspring size and number in a...

Data from: What explains rare and conspicuous colours in a snail? A test of time-series data against models of drift, migration or selection

Kerstin Johannesson & Roger K. Butlin
It is intriguing that conspicuous colour morphs of a prey species may be maintained at low frequencies alongside cryptic morphs. Negative frequency-dependent selection by predators using search images (‘apostatic selection’) is often suggested without rejecting alternative explanations. Using a maximum likelihood approach we fitted predictions from models of genetic drift, migration, constant selection, heterozygote advantage or negative frequency-dependent selection to time-series data of colour frequencies in isolated populations of a marine snail (Littorina saxatilis), re-established...

Data from: Genomic characterization of the evolutionary potential of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis facing ocean acidification

Daniel E. Runcie, Narimane Dorey, David A. Garfield, Meike Stumpp, Sam Dupont & Gregory A. Wray
Ocean acidification (OA) is increasing due to anthropogenic CO2 emissions and poses a threat to marine species and communities worldwide. To better project the effects of acidification on organisms’ health and persistence, an understanding is needed of the 1) mechanisms underlying developmental and physiological tolerance and 2) potential populations have for rapid evolutionary adaptation. This is especially challenging in nonmodel species where targeted assays of metabolism and stress physiology may not be available or economical...

Data from: Population-dependent effects of ocean acidification

Hannah L. Wood, Kristina Sundell, Bethanie Carney Almroth, Helen Sköld & Susanne P. Eriksson
Understanding the response of marine fauna to this change is critical for understanding the effects of OA. Population level variation in OA tolerance is highly relevant and important in the determination of ecosystem resilience and persistence, but has received little focus to date. In this study, whether OA has the same biological consequences in high salinity-acclimated population vs a low-salinity acclimated population of the same species was investigated in the marine isopod Idotea balthica. The...

Data from: Closely coupled evolutionary history of ecto- and endosymbionts from two distantly related animal phyla

Judith Zimmermann, Cecilia Wentrup, Miriam Sadowski, Anna Blazejak, Harald R. Gruber-Vodicka, Manuel Kleiner, Joerg A. Ott, Bodil Cronholm, Pierre De Wit, Christer Erséus & Nicole Dubilier
The level of integration between associated partners can range from ectosymbioses to extracellular and intracellular endosymbioses, and this range has been assumed to reflect a continuum from less intimate to evolutionarily highly stable associations. In this study, we examined the specificity and evolutionary history of marine symbioses in a group of closely related sulphur-oxidizing bacteria, called Candidatus Thiosymbion, that have established ecto- and endosymbioses with two distantly related animal phyla, Nematoda and Annelida. Intriguingly, in...

Data from: Hypoxia increases the risk of egg predation in a nest-guarding fish

Karin H. Olsson, Charlotta Kvarnemo, Maria Norevik Andrén & Therese Larsson
For fish with parental care, a nest should meet both the oxygenation needs of the eggs and help protect them against predators. While a small nest opening facilitates the latter, it impedes the former and vice versa. We investigated how the presence of potential egg predators in the form of shore crabs Carcinus maenas affects nest building, egg fanning, defensive displays and filial cannibalism of egg-guarding male sand gobies Pomatoschistus minutus under two levels of...

Data from: Ecological speciation in sympatric palms: 2. pre- and post-zygotic isolation

H. Hipperson, L.T. Dunning, W.J. Baker, R.K. Butlin, I. Hutton, A.S.T. Papadopulos, C.M. Smadja, T.C. Wilson, C. Devaux, Vincent Savolainen, R. K. Butlin, T. C. Wilson, W. J. Baker & A. S. T. Papadopulos
We evaluated reproductive isolation in two species of palms (Howea) that have evolved sympatrically on Lord Howe Island (LHI, Australia). We estimated the strength of some pre- and post-zygotic mechanisms in maintaining current species boundaries. We found that flowering time displacement between species is consistent across in and ex situ common gardens and is thus partly genetically determined. On LHI, pre-zygotic isolation due solely to flowering displacement was 97% for H. belmoreana and 80% for...

Data from: SpeciesGeoCoder: fast categorization of species occurrences for analyses of biodiversity, biogeography, ecology and evolution

Mats Töpel, Alexander Zizka, Fernada Calió, Ruud Scharn, Daniele Silvestro & Alexandre Antonelli
Understanding the patterns and processes underlying the uneven distribution of biodiversity across space constitutes a major scientific challenge in systematic biology and biogeography, which largely relies on effectively mapping and making sense of rapidly increasing species occurrence data. There is thus an urgent need for making the process of coding species into spatial units faster, automated, transparent, and reproducible. Here we present SpeciesGeoCoder, an open-source software package written in Python and R, that allows for...

Data from: Two-current choice flumes for testing avoidance and preference in aquatic animals

Fredrik Jutfelt, Josefin Sundin, Graham D. Raby, Anna-Sara Krång & Timothy D. Clark
Aquatic chemical ecology is an important and growing field of research that involves understanding how organisms perceive and respond to chemical cues in their environment. Research assessing the preference or avoidance of a water source containing specific chemical cues has increased in popularity in recent years, and a variety of methods have been described in the scientific literature. Two-current choice flumes have seen the greatest increase in popularity, perhaps because of their potential to address...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    22

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    22

Affiliations

  • University of Gothenburg
    22
  • University of Tasmania
    2
  • GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel
    2
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    2
  • Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg
    2
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    2
  • University of Sheffield
    2
  • Vrije Universiteit Brussel
    1
  • Ghent University
    1
  • Duke University
    1