293 Works

Trait shifts in bird communities from primary forest to human settlements in Mexican seasonal forests: Are there ruderal birds?

Leopoldo D. Vázquez-Reyes
Agriculture, cattle grazing, and human settlements negatively affect bird biodiversity, driving the loss of ecologically specialized species and favoring the dominance of generalists. Because ecological pressures define organisms' success by acting on their intrinsic traits, biodiversity loss due to anthropization might cause directional trait shifts. Here, we use a trait-based approach to find empirical evidence of trait-shifts in bird communities across an anthropization gradient in seasonal forests in central Mexico. We performed point-count bird surveys...

Data from: Molecular and morphological evidence reveals a new species of Antiphytum (Echiochiloideae, Boraginaceae) from Guerrero, Mexico

Nidia Mendoza-Díaz, Helga Ochoterena, Michael J. Moore & Hilda Flores-Olvera
Molecular and morphological evidence supports a new species in the genus Antiphytum from the Sierra Madre del Sur, in the state of Guerrero, Mexico, here described as A. brevicalyx. This species is unique in the genus by possessing a calyx shorter than the corolla tube at anthesis; it is similar to A. floribundum in inflorescence arrangement, but differs from that species in lacking a basal leaf rosette and having appendages on the corolla throat. According...

Data from: Immune response declines with age in a wild lizard

Melissa Plasman, Estela Sandoval-Zapotitla & Roxana Torres
The immune system allows animals to survive the constant attacks of pathogens. Even though it is essential for survival and fitness, the performance of the immune system can decline with age -a process known as immunosenescence- which may be responsible for the increased mortality of older individuals. There are few studies regarding the effect of age on the immune system in reptiles, and no evidence of immunosenescence has yet been reported in lizards. In a...

Data from: Background matching, disruptive coloration and differential use of microhabitats in two neotropical grasshoppers with sexual dichromatism

Víctor Hugo Ramírez-Delgado & Raúl Cueva Del Castillo
Cryptic coloration is an adaptative defensive mechanism against predators. Color patterns can become cryptic through background coloration-matching and disruptive coloration. Disruptive coloration may evolve in visually heterogeneous microhabitats, whereas background matching could be favored in chromatically homogeneous microhabitats. In this work, we used digital photography to explore the potential use of disruptive coloration and background matching in males and females of two grasshopper species of the Sphenarium genus in different habitats. We found chromatic differences...

Linking socioeconomic inequalities and type 2 diabetes through obesity and lifestyle factors among Mexican adults: a structural equations modeling approach

Edgar Denova-Gutiérrez, Delfino Vargas-Chanes, Sheyla Hernández, David Napier, Simón Barquera & Paloma Muñoz-Aguirre
Objective. To assess the association between type 2 dia­betes (DM2) and socioeconomic inequalities, mediated by the contribution of body mass index (BMI), physical activity (PA), and diet (diet-DII). Materials and methods. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using data of adults participating in the Diabetes Mellitus Survey of Mexico City. Socioeconomic and demographic characteristics as well as height and weight, dietary intake, leisure time activity and the presence of DM2 were measured. We fitted a structural...

Data from: High genetic diversity and stable Pleistocene distributional ranges in the widespread Mexican red oak Quercus castanea Née (1801) (Fagaceae)

Juan Manuel Peñaloza-Ramírez, Hernando Rodríguez-Correa, Antonio González-Rodríguez & Ken Oyama
The Mexican highlands are areas of high biological complexity where taxa of Nearctic and Neotropical origin and different population histories are found. To gain a more detailed view of the evolution of the biota in these regions, it is necessary to evaluate the effects of historical tectonic and climate events on species. Here, we analyzed the phylogeographic structure, historical demographic processes, and the contemporary period, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and Last Interglacial (LIG) ecological niche...

Environmental correlates of Leguminosae species richness in Mexico: quantifying the contributions of energy and environmental seasonality

Maribel Arenas-Navarro, Oswaldo Téllez-Valdés, Gabriel López-Segoviano, Miguel Murguía-Romero & Sebastián Tello
Explaining species richness patterns is a central issue in ecology, but a general explanation remain elusive. Environmental conditions have been proposed to be important drivers of these patterns, but we still need to better understand the relative contribution of environmental factors. Here we aim at testing two environmental hypotheses for richness gradients: energy availability and environmental seasonality using diversity patterns of the family Leguminosae across Mexico. We compiled a database of 502 species and 32,962...

Data from: A millennium of climatic and floristic dynamics in the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes

Alex Correa, Jaime Escobar, Broxton Bird, Dayenari Caballero-Rodríguez, Byron Steinman, Paula A. Rodríguez-Zorro & Jason Curtis
The transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, 950-1250 CE) to the Little Ice Age (LIA, 1350 to 1800 CE) is the largest pre-industrial climate shift within the last two millennia, offering an opportunity to study how vegetation responds to rapid climate change. We analyzed a sedimentary record from the Colombian Andes to reconstruct regional vegetation dynamics during this time interval, identify the modern environmental distribution of taxa present in the fossil record, and provide...

Data from: Arthropod distribution in a tropical rainforest: tackling a four dimensional puzzle

Yves Basset, Lukas Cizek, Philippe Cuénoud, Raphael K. Didham, Vojtech Novotny, Frode Ødegaard, Tomas Roslin, Alexey K. Tishechkin, Jürgen Schmidl, Neville N. Winchester, David W. Roubik, Henri-Pierre Aberlenc, Johannes Bail, Héctor Barrios, Jonathan R. Bridle, Gabriela Castaño-Meneses, Bruno Corbara, Gianfranco Curletti, Wesley Duarte Da Rocha, Domir De Bakker, Jacques H.C. Delabie, Alain Dejean, Laura L. Fagan, Andreas Floren, Roger L. Kitching … & Jacques H. C. Delabie
Quantifying the spatio-temporal distribution of arthropods in tropical rainforests represents a first step towards scrutinizing the global distribution of biodiversity on Earth. To date most studies have focused on narrow taxonomic groups or lack a design that allows partitioning of the components of diversity. Here, we consider an exceptionally large dataset (113,952 individuals representing 5,858 species), obtained from the San Lorenzo forest in Panama, where the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa was surveyed using 14...

Data from: From cacti to carnivores: improved phylotranscriptomic sampling and hierarchical homology inference provide further insight into the evolution of Caryophyllales

Joseph Frederic Walker, Ya Yang, Tao Feng, Alfonso Timoneda, Jessica Mikenas, Vera Hutchison, Caroline Edwards, Ning Wang, Sonia Ahluwalia, Julia Olivieri, Nathanael Walker-Hale, Lucas C. Majure, Raúl Puente, Gudrun Kadereit, Maximillian Lauterbach, Urs Eggli, Hilda Flores-Olvera, Helga Ochoterena, Samuel F. Brockington, Michael J. Moore & Stephen A. Smith
Premise of the Study— The Caryophyllales contains ~12,500 species and is known for its cosmopolitan distribution, convergence of trait evolution, and extreme adaptations. Some relationships within the Caryophyllales, like those of many large plant clades, remain unclear and phylogenetic studies often recover alternative hypotheses. We explore the utility of broad and dense transcriptome sampling across the order for resolving evolutionary relationships in Caryophyllales. Methods— We generated 84 transcriptomes and combined these with 224 publicly available...

Data from: A new species of horned lizard (genus Phrynosoma) from Guerrero, México, with an updated multilocus phylogeny

Adrián Nieto-Montes De Oca, Diego Arenas-Moreno, Elizabeth Beltrán-Sánchez & Adam D. Leaché
We describe a new species of Phrynosoma from central northeastern Guerrero, México; perform a phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data to estimate its phylogenetic relationships; and investigate the monophyly of Phrynosoma asio, P. braconnieri, and P. taurus. The new species can be distinguished from all of its congeners by the possession of a unique combination of morphological characteristics. The molecular genetic data include three fragments of the mitochondrial genome and six nuclear genes...

Data from: Limitations of climate data for inferring species boundaries: insights from speckled rattlesnakes

Jesse M. Meik, Jeffrey W. Streicher, A. Michelle Lawing, Oscar Flores-Villela & Matthew K. Fujita
Phenotypes, DNA, and measures of ecological differences are widely used in species delimitation. Although rarely defined in such studies, ecological divergence is almost always approximated using multivariate climatic data associated with sets of specimens (i.e., the “climatic niche”); the justification for this approach is that species-specific climatic envelopes act as surrogates for physiological tolerances. Using identical statistical procedures, we evaluated the usefulness and validity of the climate-as-proxy assumption by comparing performance of genetic (nDNA SNPs...

Data from: Untangling the evolutionary history of a highly polymorphic species: introgressive hybridization and high genetic structure in the desert cichlid fish Herichthys minckleyi

Isabel S. Magalhaes, Claudia Patricia Ornelas-García, Mariana Leal-Cardin, Tania Ramírez & Marta Barluenga
Understanding the origin of biodiversity requires knowledge on the evolutionary processes that drive divergence and speciation, as well as on the processes constraining it. Intraspecific polymorphisms can provide insight into the mechanisms that generate and maintain phenotypic, behavioural and life history diversification, and can help us understand not only the processes that lead to speciation but also the processes that prevent local fixation of morphs. The ‘desert cichlid’ Herichtys minckleyi is a highly polymorphic species...

Data from: Molecular proxies for climate maladaptation in a long-lived tree (Pinus pinaster Aiton, Pinaceae)

Juan Pablo Jaramilo-Correa, Isabel Rodríguez-Quilón, Delphine Grivet, Camille Lepoittevin, Federico Sebastiani, Myriam Heuertz, Pauline H. Garnier-Géré, Ricardo Alía, Christophe Plomion, Giovanni G. Vendramin, Santiago C. González-Martínez, J.-P. Jaramillo-Correa, S. C. Gonzalez-Martinez & P. H. Garnier-Gere
Understanding adaptive genetic responses to climate change is a main challenge for preserving biological diversity. Successful predictive models for climate-driven range shifts of species depend on the integration of information on adaptation, including that derived from genomic studies. Long-lived forest trees can experience substantial environmental change across generations, which results in a much more prominent adaptation lag than in annual species. Here, we show that candidate-gene SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) can be used as predictors...

Data from: The evolution of bat nucleic acid sensing Toll-like receptors

Marina Escalera-Zamudio, Lisandra M. Zepeda-Mendoza, Elizabeth Loza-Rubio, Edith Rojas-Anaya, Maria L. Méndez-Ojeda, Carlos F. Arias & Alex D. Greenwood
We characterized the nucleic acid sensing Toll-like receptors (TLR) of a New World bat species, the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), and through a comparative molecular evolutionary approach searched for general adaptation patterns among the nucleic acid sensing TLRs of eight different bats species belonging to three families (Pteropodidae, Vespertilionidae and Phyllostomidae). We found that the bat TLRs are evolving slowly and mostly under purifying selection and that the divergence pattern of such receptors is...

Data from: UV photoreceptors and UV-yellow wing pigments in Heliconius butterflies allow a color signal to serve both mimicry and intraspecific communication

Seth M. Bybee, Furong Yuan, Monica D. Ramstetter, Jorge Llorente-Bousquets, Robert D. Reed, Daniel Osorio & Adriana D. Briscoe
Mimetic wing coloration evolves in butterflies in the context of predator confusion. Unless butterfly eyes have adaptations for discriminating mimetic color variation, mimicry also carries a risk of confusion for the butterflies themselves. Heliconius butterfly eyes, which express recently duplicated UV opsins, have such an adaptation. To examine bird and butterfly color vision as sources of selection on butterfly coloration we studied yellow wing pigmentation in the tribe Heliconiini. We confirmed using reflectance and mass...

Data from: Do freshwater ecoregions and continental shelf width predict patterns of historical gene flow in the freshwater fish Poecilia butleri?

J. Jaime Zúñiga-Vega, Spencer J. Ingley, Peter J. Unmack & Jerald B. Johnson
We examined historical patterns of gene flow in the freshwater fish Poecilia butleri in western Mexico. We tested the hypothesis that the boundaries between four freshwater ecological communities (ecoregions) might have limited the movement of P. butleri because changes in species compositions might restrict establishment between adjacent ecoregions, even in situations where a physical barrier is absent. Hence, we predicted that boundaries between ecoregions should correspond to phylogeographical breaks in P. butleri. We also tested...

Elucidating gene expression adaptation of phylogenetically divergent coral holobionts under heat stress

Viridiana Avila-Magaña, Bishoy Kamel, Michael DeSalvo, Kelly Gómez-Campo, Susana Enríquez, Hiroaki Kitano, Rori Rohlfs, Roberto Iglesias-Prieto & Mónica Medina
As coral reefs struggle to survive under climate change, it is crucial to know whether they have the capacity to withstand changing conditions, particularly increasing seawater temperatures. Thermal tolerance requires the integrative response of the different components of the coral holobiont (coral host, algal photosymbiont, and associated microbiome). Here, using a controlled thermal stress experiment across three divergent Caribbean coral species, we attempt to dissect holobiont member metatranscriptome responses from coral taxa with different sensitivities...

Colorful traits in female birds relate to individual condition, reproductive performance, and male mate preferences: A meta-analytic approach dataset

America Hernandez, Rene Beamonte-Barrientos, Margarita Martinez-Gomez & Bibiana Montoya
Colorful traits in females are suggested to have evolved and be maintained by sexual selection. Although several studies have evaluated this idea, support is still equivocal. Evidence has been compiled in reviews, and a handful of quantitative synthesis have explored evidence of the link between condition and specific color traits in males and females. However, understanding the potential function of females’ colorful traits in sexual communication has not been the primary focus of any of...

Data from: Tree recruitment failure in old-growth forest patches across human-modified rainforests

Ricard Arasa-Gisbert, Víctor Arroyo-Rodríguez, Carmen Galán-Acedo, Jorge A. Meave & Miguel Martínez-Ramos
1. Land-use change threatens biodiversity in tropical landscapes, but its impact on forest regeneration remains poorly known. In fact, the landscape-scale patterns driving the diversity of regenerating plants within forest fragments have been rarely explored, and we are uncertain whether such drivers vary across regions with different land-use change patterns. 2. We assessed the effect of landscape composition (forest cover and matrix openness) and configuration (forest patch density) on species diversity of sapling assemblages (trees...

Good alimentation can overcome the negative effects of climate change on growth in reptiles

Pilar Rueda-Zozaya, Melissa Plasman & Victor Hugo Reynoso
Climate change may lead to higher nest temperatures, which may increase embryo development rate, but reduce hatchling size and growth. Larger body size permits better performance, making growth an important fitness trait. In ectotherms, growth is affected by temperature and food quality. To segregate the effects of incubation temperature vs. alimentation on the growth of the Mexican black spiny tailed iguana Ctenosaura pectinata, we incubated eggs at 29 and 32ºC, and hatchlings were kept at...

Non-adaptive evolutionary processes governed the diversification of a temperate conifer lineage after its migration into the tropics

Jorge Cruz Nicolás, Alfredo Villarruel-Arroyo, David S. Gernandt, Rosa M. Fonseca, Erika Aguirre-Planter, Luis E. Eguiarte & Juan Pablo Jaramillo-Correa
Constructing phylogenetic relationships among closely related species is a recurrent challenge in evolutionary biology, particularly for long-lived taxa with large effective population sizes and uncomplete reproductive isolation, like conifers. Conifers further have slow evolutionary rates, which raises the question of whether adaptive or non/adaptive processes were predominantly involved when they rapidly diversified after migrating from temperate regions into the tropical mountains. Indeed, fine-scale phylogenetic relationships within several conifer genus remain under debate. Here, we studied...

Data from: Low-copy nuclear genes reveal new evidence of incongruence in relationships within Malvaceae s.l.

Rebeca Hernández-Gutiérrez, Carolina Granados Mendoza & Susana Magallón
The family Malvaceae s. l. is a clade that comprises nine subfamilies. Phylogenetic relationships among them are not completely resolved and are inconsistent among studies, probably due to low phylogenetic informativeness of conventional molecular markers. In the present study, we provide new phylogenetic information for Malvaceae s.l. derived from newly-designed group-specific nuclear markers. By mining transcriptome data from the One Thousand Plant Project (1KP) and publicly available genome information from cotton, cacao, and Arabidopsis, we...

Cumulative germination of seeds ingested by black howler monkeys

Julieta Benitez Malvido & Ana Maria González-Di Pierro
Premise of the Study: Primates are important seed dispersers, especially for large-seeded (> 1 cm length) tropical species in continuous and fragmented rainforests. Methods: In three forest fragments within the Montes Azules Biosphere Reserve, southern Mexico, we investigated the effect of howler monkeys´ (Alouatta pigra) gut passage on the germination rate and maximum germination (%) of native large-seeded species. One group of howler monkeys, per fragment, was followed and fresh feces collected. Large seeds were...

Volcanism and paleoclimate change drive diversification of world’s largest whip spider (Amblypygi)

Frederic Dominique Schramm, Alejandro Valdez-Mondragón & Lorenzo Prendini
The tropics contain many of the most biodiverse regions on Earth but the processes responsible for generating this diversity remain poorly understood. This study investigated the drivers of diversification in arthropods with stenotopic ecological requirements and limited dispersal capability using as model the monotypic whip spider (Amblypygi) genus Acanthophrynus, widespread in the tropical deciduous forests of Mexico. We hypothesized that for these organisms, the tropical deciduous forests serve as a conduit for dispersal, with their...

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