28 Works

Data from: Differences in nitrogen cycling between tropical dry forests with contrasting precipitation revealed by stable isotopes of nitrogen in plants and soils

Anaitzi Rivero-Villar, Pamela H. Templer, Víctor Parra-Tabla, Julio Campo. & Julio Campo
Despite the known links between climate and biogeochemical cycling of N in tropical forests, fundamental knowledge of N cycling is still far from complete. Our objective was to ascertain differences in the N cycle of two tropical dry forests under contrasting precipitation regime (1240 or 642 mm of mean annual rainfall). To do so, we examined a short-term metric of N cycling (N concentration) and a more integrated metric of N cycling (natural abundance 15N)...

Data from: Contemporaneous radiations of fungi and plants linked to symbiosis

François Lutzoni, Michael D. Nowak, Michael E. Alfaro, Valérie Reeb, Jolanta Miadlikowska, Michael Krug, A. Elizabeth Arnold, Louise A. Lewis, David L. Swofford, David Hibbett, Khidir Hilu, Timothy Y. James, Dietmar Quandt & Susana Magallón
Interactions between fungi and plants, including parasitism, mutualism, and saprotrophy, have been invoked as key to their respective macroevolutionary success. Here we evaluate the origins of plant-fungal symbioses and saprotrophy using a time-calibrated phylogenetic framework that reveals linked and drastic shifts in diversification rates of each kingdom. Fungal colonization of land was associated with at least two origins of terrestrial green algae and preceded embryophytes (as evidenced by losses of fungal flagellum, ca. 720 Ma),...

Data from: Drivers of the spatial scale that best predict primate responses to landscape structure

Carmen Galán-Acedo, Victor Arroyo-Rodriguez, Alejandro Estrada & Gabriel Ramos-Fernández
Understanding the effect of landscape structure on biodiversity is critically needed to improve management strategies. To accurately evaluate such effect, landscape metrics need to be assessed at the correct scale, i.e. considering the spatial extent at which species‐landscape relationship is strongest (scale of effect, SE). Although SE is highly variable, its drivers are poorly known, but of key relevance to understand the way species use the landscape. In this study, we evaluate whether and how...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    28

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    28

Affiliations

  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    28
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • University of California System
    2
  • Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
    2
  • University of Hawaii at Manoa
    2
  • University of Connecticut
    2
  • University of Arizona
    2
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    2
  • Instituto Politécnico Nacional
    2