124 Works

Data from: Chimpanzee communities differ in their inter- and intrasexual social relationships

Edwin J. C. Van Leeuwen, Bruce Rawlings & Marina Davila-Ross
Male and female human social bonding strategies are both culturally and genetically shaped. Chimpanzees, our phylogenetically joint closest living relatives, exhibit complex social structures and show impressive cultural diversity. Whether chimpanzee male and female bonding patterns are culturally shaped remains unclear. Studies of wild chimpanzees bonding across sex show that in some communities males show strong bonds with other males, whereas in others females form particularly strong intra-sex bonds. This suggests that there may be...

Simulated past and future ice geometry of Cook Glacier, East Antarctica

James Jordan, Chris Stokes, G. Hilmar Gudmundsson, Adrian Jenkins, Bertie Miles & Stewart Jamieson
Input and results files for the ice dynamics model Ua simulating potential past and future ice geometry of Cook Glacier, East Antarctica. Results seek to explain potential causes of recent observed acceleration and speculate on future causes of acceleration. This work was funded by NERC grant NE/R000719/1.

Dissolved rhenium and other dissolved ions in Alpine catchments of the Erlenbach and Vogelbach (Switzerland) and the East River (Colorado, USA)

Robert G Hilton & Mathieu Dellinger
The measurements and data contained here were obtained to study the chemical weathering of sedimentary rocks, and more specifically the oxidation of rock organic carbon and the associated release of CO2. The primary aim was to better understand the production and mobility of the trace element rhenium during weathering, because this element has been proposed as a proxy for rock organic carbon oxidation. The study focused on three Alpine catchments that drain sedimentary rocks, which...

Data from: Phenotypic and genetic divergence among harbour porpoise populations associated with habitat regions in the North Sea and adjacent seas.

Carlos De Luna Lopez, Simon J. Goodman, Oliver Thatcher, Paul D. Jepson, Liselotte Andersen, Krystal Tolley & Alan R. Hoelzel
Determining the mechanisms that generate population structure is essential to the understanding of speciation and the evolution of biodiversity. Here, we investigate a geographic range that transects two habitat gradients, the North Sea to North Atlantic transition, and the temperate to sub-polar regions. We studied the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), a small odontocete inhabiting both sub-polar and temperate waters. To assess differentiation among putative populations we measured morphological variation at cranial traits (N=462 individuals) and...

Data from: Geographical variation in species' population responses to changes in temperature and precipitation

James W. Pearce-Higgins, Nancy Ockendon, David J. Baker, Jamie Carr, Elizabeth C. White, Rosamunde E. A. Almond, Tatsuya Amano, Esther Bertram, Richard B. Bradbury, Cassie Bradley, Stuart H. M. Butchart, Nathalie Doswald, Wendy Foden, David J. C. Gill, Rhys E. Green, William J. Sutherland & Edmund V. J. Tanner
Despite increasing concerns about the vulnerability of species’ populations to climate change, there has been little overall synthesis of how individual population responses to variation in climate differ between taxa, with trophic level or geographically. To address this, we extracted data from 132 long-term (≥20 years) studies of population responses to temperature and precipitation covering 236 animal and plant species across terrestrial and freshwater habitats. Temperature tended to have a greater overall impact on populations...

Data from: Non-linear effects of phylogenetic distance on early-stage establishment of experimentally introduced plants in grassland communities

Eva Maria Malecore, Wayne Dawson, Anne Kempel, Gregor Müller & Mark Van Kleunen
1. The phylogenetic distance of an introduced plant species to a resident native community may play a role in determining its establishment success. While Darwin’s naturalization hypothesis predicts a positive relationship, the preadaptation hypothesis predicts a negative relationship. Rigorous tests of this now so-called Darwin’s naturalization conundrum require not only information on establishment successes but also of failures, which is frequently not available. Such essential information, however, can be provided by experimental introductions. 2. Here,...

Data from: Rapid and dynamic alternative splicing impacts the Arabidopsis cold response transcriptome

Cristiane P. G. Calixto, Wenbin Guo, Allan B. James, Nikoleta A. Tzioutziou, Juan C. Entizne, Paige E. Panter, Heather Knight, Hugh Nimmo, Runxuan Zhang & John W. S. Brown
Plants have adapted to tolerate and survive constantly changing environmental conditions by re-programming gene expression. The dynamics of the contribution of alternative splicing (AS) to stress responses are unknown. RNA-sequencing of a time-series of Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to cold determines the timing of significant AS changes. This shows a massive and rapid AS response with coincident waves of transcriptional and AS activity occurring in the first few hours of temperature reduction, and further AS...

Data from: Flexibility, variability and constraint in energy management strategies across vertebrate taxa revealed by long-term heart rate measurements

Lewis G. Halsey, Jonathan A. Green, Sean D. Twiss, Walter Arnold, Sarah J. Burthe, Patrick J. Butler, Steve J. Cooke, David Gremillet, Thomas Ruf, Olivia Hicks, Katarzyna J. Minta, Tanya S. Prystay, Claudia A.F. Wascher, Vincent Careau, Steven J Cooke, Tania S Prystay & Claudia AF Wascher
1) Animals are expected to be judicious in the use of the energy they gain due to the costs and limits associated with its intake. The management of energy expenditure (EE) exhibited by animals has previously been considered in terms of three patterns: the constrained, independent and performance patterns of energy management. These patterns can be interpreted by regressing daily EE against maintenance EE measured over extended periods. From the multiple studies on this topic,...

Data from: Continent‐scale phenotype mapping using citizen scientists’ photographs

Jonathan P. Drury, Morgan Barnes, Ann E. Finneran, Maddie Harris & Gregory F. Grether
Field investigations of phenotypic variation in free‐living organisms are often limited in scope owing to time and funding constraints. By collaborating with online communities of amateur naturalists, investigators can greatly increase the amount and diversity of phenotypic data in their analyses while simultaneously engaging with a public audience. Here, we present a method for quantifying phenotypes of individual organisms in citizen scientists’ photographs. We then show that our protocol for measuring wing phenotypes from photographs...

Data from: Visual and non-visual navigation in blind patients with a retinal prosthesis

Sara Garcia, Karin Petrini, Gary S. Rubin, Lyndon Da Cruz & Marko Nardini
Human adults with normal vision can combine visual landmark and non-visual self-motion cues to improve their navigational precision. Here we asked whether blind individuals treated with a retinal prosthesis could also benefit from using the resultant new visual signal together with non-visual information when navigating. Four patients (blind for 15-52 years) implanted with the Argus II retinal prosthesis (Second Sight Medical Products Inc. Sylmar, CA), and five age-matched and six younger controls, participated. Participants completed...

Data from: Alien and native plant establishment in grassland communities is more strongly affected by disturbance than above- and below-ground enemies

Gregor Müller, Lena Horstmeyer, Tilman Rönneburg, Mark Van Kleunen & Wayne Dawson
Understanding the factors that drive commonness and rarity of plant species and whether these factors differ for alien and native species are key questions in ecology. If a species is to become common in a community, incoming propagules must first be able to establish. The latter could be determined by competition with resident plants, the impacts of herbivores and soil biota, or a combination of these factors. We aimed to tease apart the roles that...

Data from: The contemporary distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans, alternative hosts and vectors

Annie J. Browne, Carlos A. Guerra, Renato Vieira Alves, Veruska Maia Da Costa, Anne L. Wilson, David M. Pigott, Simon I. Hay, Steve W. Lindsay, Nick Golding & Catherine L. Moyes
Chagas is a potentially fatal chronic disease affecting large numbers of people across the Americas and exported throughout the world through human population movement. It is caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi parasite, which is transmitted by triatomine vectors to humans and a wide range of alternative host species. The database described here was compiled to allow the risk of vectorial transmission to humans to be mapped using geospatial models. The database collates all available records,...

Data from: Freezer on, lights off! Environmental effects on activity rhythms of fish in the Arctic

Kate L. Hawley, Carolyn M. Rosten, Thrond O. Haugen, Guttorm Christensen & Martyn C. Lucas
Polar regions are characterized by acute seasonal changes in the environment, with organisms inhabiting these regions lacking diel photoperiodic information for parts of the year. We present, to our knowledge, the first high-resolution analysis of diel and seasonal activity of free-living fishes in polar waters (74°N), subject to extreme variation in photoperiod, temperature and food availability. Using biotelemetry, we tracked two sympatric ecomorphs of lake-dwelling Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus n = 23) over an annual...

Permian–Triassic phylogenetic and morphologic evolution of rhynchonellide brachiopods

Zhen Guo, Zhong-Qiang Chen, A. T. Harper David & Yuangeng Huang
The Rhynchonellida is a major group of brachiopods that survived the “big five” mass extinctions and flourished after the Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) crisis. However, phylogenetic and character evolution in the Rhynchonellida across the P-Tr transition is poorly understood. In view of the widespread homoplasy across this order, we employ a tip-dated Bayesian analysis to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships for Late Permian–Triassic rhynchonellides. The same data were also analyzed using three other methods: undated Bayesian, equal-weighting, and implied-weighting...

Global maps of current (1979-2013) and future (2061-2080) habitat suitability probability for 1,485 European endemic plant species

Robin Pouteau, Idoia Biurrun, Caroline Brunel, Milan Chytrý, Wayne Dawson, Franz Essl, Trevor Fristoe, Rense Haveman, Carsten Hobohm, Florian Jansen, Holger Kreft, Jonathan Lenoir, Bernd Lenzner, Carsten Meyer, Jesper Erenskjold Moeslund, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, Jens-Christian Svenning, Wilfried Thuiller, Patrick Weigelt, Thomas Wohlgemuth, Qiang Yang & Mark Van Kleunen
Aims: The rapid increase in the number of species that have naturalized beyond their native range is among the most apparent features of the Anthropocene. How alien species will respond to other processes of future global changes is an emerging concern and remains largely misunderstood. We therefore ask whether naturalized species will respond to climate and land-use change differently than those species not yet naturalized anywhere in the world. Location: Global Methods: We investigated future...

RNA-seq of Arabidopsis root growth responses to mechanical impedance

Keith Lindsey, Amy Jacobsen, Jian Xu, Jennifer Topping & George Jervis
1. The growth and development of root systems, essential for plant performance, is influenced by mechanical properties of the substrate in which the plants grow. Mechanical impedance, such as by compacted soil, can reduce root elongation and limit crop productivity. 2. To understand better the mechanisms involved in plant root responses to mechanical impedance stress, we investigated changes in the root transcriptome and hormone signalling responses of Arabidopsis to artificial root barrier systems in vitro....

Energetic limits: Defining the bounds and trade-offs of successful energy management in a capital breeder

Courtney Shuert, Lewis Halsey, Patrick Pomeroy & Sean Twiss
1. Judicious management of energy can be invaluable for animal survival and reproductive success. Capital breeding mammals typically transfer energy to their young at extremely high rates while undergoing prolonged fasting, making lactation a tremendously energy demanding period. Effective management of the competing demands of the mother’s energy needs and those of her offspring is presumably fundamental to maximising lifetime reproductive success. 2. How does the mother maximise her chances of successfully rearing her pup,...

Data from: Global vegetation patterns of the past 140,000 years

Judy Allen, Matthew Forrest, Thomas Hickler, Joy Singarayer, Paul Valdes & Brian Huntley
Aim Insight into global biome responses to climatic and other environmental changes is essential to address key questions about past and future impacts of such changes. By simulating global biome patterns 140 ka to present we aimed to address important questions about biome changes during this interval. Location Global. Taxon Plantae. Methods Using the LPJ-GUESS dynamic global vegetation model, we made 89 simulations driven using ice-core atmospheric CO2 concentrations, Earth’s obliquity, and outputs from a...

Research data supporting the publication \"Halogenation of Li7La3Zr2O12 Solid Electrolytes: A Combined Solid-State NMR, Computational and Electrochemical Study\"

Bo Dong, Abby Haworth, Stephen Yeandel, Mark Stockham, Matthew James, Jingwei Xiu, Dawei Wang, Pooja Goddard, Karen Johnston & Peter Slater

DOC nutrient addition experiments

Catherine Moody & Fred Worrall
Peatlands are typically rich in labile dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM) but poor in nutrients; as these peatland waters flow through a catchment they mix with more nutrient-rich but organic matter (OM) poor waters. These new sources of nutrients may lead to increased OM degradation, driving further release of CO2 to the atmosphere. The aim of this study was to discover if the addition of nutrients changed the rates of peat-derived dissolved...

Supporting data and software for: Low-temperature open-air synthesis of PVP-coated NaYF4:Yb,Er,Mn upconversion nanoparticles with strong red emission

Lewis MacKenzie, Diana Àlvarez Ruiz & Robert Pal
Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have unique photonic properties that make them ideally suited for many applications. They are excited by low-energy near-infrared photons and emit at higher energy (typically visible) wavebands. However, synthesis of UCNPs requires either high pressure reaction chambers or inert atmospheres. Combined with the requirements for high-temperatures (200 to 400 °C) and long reaction times (e.g. up to 24 hours), these place barriers to entry for UCNP research, in terms of both financial...

Data and R-code from 'Mode of death and mortality risk factors in Amazon trees'. Nature communications. 2020

Adriane Esquivel Muelbert, Oliver L. Phillips, Roel J. W. Brienen, Sophie Fauset, Martin J. P. Sullivan, Timothy R. Baker, Kuo-Jung Chao, Ted R. Feldpausch, Emanuel Gloor, Niro Higuchi, Jeanne Houwing-Duistermaat, Jon Lloyd, Haiyan Liu, Yadvinder Malhi, Beatriz Marimon, Ben Hur Marimon Junior, Abel Monteagudo-Mendoza, Lourens Poorter, Marcos Silveira, Emilio Vilanova Torre, Esteban Alvarez Dávila, Jhon del Aguila Pasquel, Everton Almeida, Patricia Alvarez Loayza & Ana Andrade

Supplementary information for Paleoceanographic changes in the late Pliocene promoted rapid diversification in pelagic seabirds

Joan Ferrer Obiol, Helen F. James, R. Terry Chesser, Vincent Bretagnolle, Jacob González-Solís, Julio Rozas, Andreanna J. Welch & Marta Riutort
Aim: Paleoceanographic changes can act as drivers of diversification and speciation, even in highly mobile marine organisms. Shearwaters are a group of globally distributed and highly mobile pelagic seabirds. Despite a recent well resolved phylogeny, shearwaters have controversial species limits, and show periods of both slow and rapid diversification. Here, we explore the role of paleoceanographic changes on the diversification and speciation in these highly mobile pelagic seabirds. We investigate shearwater biogeography and the evolution...

Numerical model output data on the interaction of flow with a permeable bed and biofilms

G. H. Sambrook Smith, R. J. Hardy & S. Sinha
The data contains numerical model simulations designed to assess the influence of a) a permeable bed on flow structures above and within the pore spaces of a bed and b) a biofilm streamer on the free flow structure. For the former the data relates to a novel Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that is able to simulate flow both in the boundary layer flow and Brinkman layer. This allows simultaneous predictions of surface and subsurface...

Soil map of the Moor House National Nature Reserve

G.A.L. Johnson
This is a digital soil map of the Moor House - Upper Teesdale National Nature Reserve. Mapped polygons represent a range of soil types. The site lies in the North Pennine uplands of England and has an area of 74 km2. It is England's highest and largest terrestrial National Nature Reserve (NNR), a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and a European Special Protection Area. Habitats include exposed summits, extensive blanket peatlands, upland grasslands, pastures, hay meadows and...

Registration Year

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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Durham University
    124
  • University of Konstanz
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  • University of Vienna
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