14 Works

Data from: Non-linear effects of phylogenetic distance on early-stage establishment of experimentally introduced plants in grassland communities

Eva Maria Malecore, Wayne Dawson, Anne Kempel, Gregor Müller & Mark Van Kleunen
1. The phylogenetic distance of an introduced plant species to a resident native community may play a role in determining its establishment success. While Darwin’s naturalization hypothesis predicts a positive relationship, the preadaptation hypothesis predicts a negative relationship. Rigorous tests of this now so-called Darwin’s naturalization conundrum require not only information on establishment successes but also of failures, which is frequently not available. Such essential information, however, can be provided by experimental introductions. 2. Here,...

Data from: Flexibility, variability and constraint in energy management strategies across vertebrate taxa revealed by long-term heart rate measurements

Lewis G. Halsey, Jonathan A. Green, Sean D. Twiss, Walter Arnold, Sarah J. Burthe, Patrick J. Butler, Steve J. Cooke, David Gremillet, Thomas Ruf, Olivia Hicks, Katarzyna J. Minta, Tanya S. Prystay, Claudia A.F. Wascher, Vincent Careau, Steven J Cooke, Tania S Prystay & Claudia AF Wascher
1) Animals are expected to be judicious in the use of the energy they gain due to the costs and limits associated with its intake. The management of energy expenditure (EE) exhibited by animals has previously been considered in terms of three patterns: the constrained, independent and performance patterns of energy management. These patterns can be interpreted by regressing daily EE against maintenance EE measured over extended periods. From the multiple studies on this topic,...

Data from: Rapid and dynamic alternative splicing impacts the Arabidopsis cold response transcriptome

Cristiane P. G. Calixto, Wenbin Guo, Allan B. James, Nikoleta A. Tzioutziou, Juan C. Entizne, Paige E. Panter, Heather Knight, Hugh Nimmo, Runxuan Zhang & John W. S. Brown
Plants have adapted to tolerate and survive constantly changing environmental conditions by re-programming gene expression. The dynamics of the contribution of alternative splicing (AS) to stress responses are unknown. RNA-sequencing of a time-series of Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to cold determines the timing of significant AS changes. This shows a massive and rapid AS response with coincident waves of transcriptional and AS activity occurring in the first few hours of temperature reduction, and further AS...

Data from: Spatio-temporal variation in fitness responses to contrasting environments in Arabidopsis thaliana

Moises Exposito-Alonso, Adrian C. Brennan, Carlos Alonso-Blanco & F. Xavier Pico
The evolutionary response of organisms to global climate change is expected to be strongly conditioned by pre-existing standing genetic variation. In addition, natural selection imposed by global climate change on fitness-related traits can be heterogeneous over time. We estimated selection of life-history traits of an entire genetic lineage of the plant A. thaliana occurring in north-western Iberian Peninsula that were transplanted over multiple years into two environmentally contrasting field sites in southern Spain, as southern...

Data from: Epidermal expression of a sterol biosynthesis gene regulates root growth by a non-cell autonomous mechanism in Arabidopsis

Eleri Short, Margaret Leighton, Gul Imriz, Dongbin Liu, Naomi Cope-Selby, Flora Hetherington, Andrei Smertenko, Patrick J. Hussey, Jennifer F. Topping & Keith Lindsey
The epidermis is hypothesized to play a signalling role during plant development. One class of mutants showing defects in signal transduction and radial patterning are those in sterol biosynthesis. The expectation is that living cells require sterols, but it is not clear that all cell types express sterol biosynthesis genes. The HYDRA1 (HYD1) gene of Arabidopsis encodes sterol ∆8-∆7 isomerase, and although hyd1 seedlings are defective in radial patterning across several tissues, we show that...

Data from: Autofertility and self-compatibility moderately benefit island colonization of plants

Mialy Razanajatovo, Mark Van Kleunen, Holger Kreft, Wayne Dawson, Franz Essl, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, Marten Winter & Patrick Weigelt
Aim: The current geographical distribution of species largely reflects colonization success after natural long‐distance dispersal or introduction by humans. Plants with selfing ability should have an advantage when establishing on islands where mates and pollinators are limited (Baker's law). However, high percentages of dioecious and self‐incompatible species have been reported for some islands, possibly resulting from post‐colonization evolution. Given that such evolution is less likely to apply to alien species recently introduced to islands by...

Data from: Synchronous diversification of Sulawesi's iconic artiodactyls driven by recent geological events

Laurent A. F. Frantz, Anna Rudzinski, Abang Mansyursyah Surya Nugraha, Allowen Evin, James Burton, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Anna Linderholm, Ross Barnett, Rodrigo Vega, Evan K. Irving-Pease, James Haile, Richard Allen, Kristin Leus, Jill Shephard, Mia Hillyer, Sarah Gillemot, Jeroen Van Den Hurk, Sharron Ogle, Cristina Atofanei, Mark G. Thomas, Friederike Johansson, Abdul Haris Mustari, John Williams, Kusdiantoro Mohamad, Chandramaya Siska Damayanti … & Greger Larson
The high degree of endemism on Sulawesi has previously been suggested to have vicariant origins, dating back 40 Myr ago. Recent studies, however, suggest that much of Sulawesi’s fauna assembled over the last 15 Myr. Here, we test the hypothesis that more recent uplift of previously submerged portions of land on Sulawesi promoted diversification, and that much of its faunal assemblage is much younger than the island itself. To do so, we combined palaeogeographical reconstructions...

Data from: Introduced garden plants are strong competitors of native and alien residents under simulated climate change

Emily Haeuser, Wayne Dawson & Mark Van Kleunen
1) Most invasive plants have been originally introduced for horticultural purposes. Still, most alien garden plants have not naturalized yet, probably due in part to inadequate climatic conditions. Climate change may alter this, but few experimental studies have addressed this for non-naturalized alien garden plants, and those that have, addressed only singular aspects of climate change. 2) In a greenhouse experiment, we examined the performance of nine non-naturalized alien herbaceous garden plants of varying climatic...

Data from: Completing the hybridization triangle: the inheritance of genetic incompatibilities during homoploid hybrid speciation in ragworts (Senecio).

Adrian C. Brennan, Simon J. Hiscock & Richard J. Abbott
A new homoploid hybrid lineage needs to establish a degree of reproductive isolation from its parent species if it is to persist as an independent entity, but the role hybridization plays in this process is known in only a handful of cases. The homoploid hybrid ragwort species, Senecio squalidus, (Oxford ragwort) originated following the introduction of hybrid plants to the UK approximately 320 years ago. The source of the hybrid plants was from a naturally...

Data from: The evolutionary history of dogs in the Americas

Máire Ní Leathlobhair, Angela R. Perri, Evan K. Irving-Pease, Kelsey E. Witt, Anna Linderholm, James Haile, Ophelie Lebrasseur, Carly Ameen, Jeffrey Blick, Adam R. Boyko, Selina Brace, Yahaira Nunes Cortes, Susan J. Crockford, Alison Devault, Evangelos A. Dimopoulos, Morley Eldridge, Jacob Enk, Shyam Gopalakrishnan, Kevin Gori, Vaughan Grimes, Eric Guiry, Anders J. Hansen, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, John Johnson, Andrew Kitchen … & Laurent A. F. Frantz
Dogs were present in the Americas prior to the arrival of European colonists, but the origin and fate of these pre-contact dogs are largely unknown. We sequenced 71 mitochondrial and seven nuclear genomes from ancient North American and Siberian dogs spanning ~9,000 years. Our analysis indicates that American dogs were not domesticated from North American wolves. Instead, American dogs form a monophyletic lineage that likely originated in Siberia and dispersed into the Americas alongside people....

Data from: European ornamental garden flora as an invasion debt under climate change

Emily Haeuser, Wayne Dawson, Wilfried Thuiller, Stefan Dullinger, Svenja Block, Oliver Bossdorf, Marta Carboni, Luisa Conti, Iwona Dullinger, Franz Essl, Günther Klonner, Dietmar Moser, Tamara Muenkemueller, Madalin Parepa, Matthew V. Talluto, Holger Kreft, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, Patrick Weigelt, Marten Winter, Martin Hermy, Sebastiaan Van Der Veken, Cristina Roquet & Mark Van Kleunen
1.Most naturalized and invasive alien plant species were originally introduced to regions for horticultural purposes. However, many regions now face an invasion debt from ornamental alien species, which have not yet naturalized. In this regard, climate change represents a threat as it may lower the barriers to naturalization for some ornamental alien species. Identifying those species is extremely important for anticipating impending invasions. 2.To identify predictors of naturalization, we modelled the effects of climate, nursery...

Data from: Carotenoid-based skin ornaments reflect foraging propensity in a seabird, Sula leucogaster

Nathan P. Michael, Roxana Torres, Andreanna J. Welch, Josh Adams, Mario Erandi Bonillas-Monge, Jonathan Felis, Laura Lopez-Marquez, Alejandro Martínez-Flores & Anne E. Wiley
Carotenoid-based ornaments are common signaling features in animals. It has long been proposed that such ornaments communicate information about foraging abilities to potential mates. However, evidence linking foraging with ornamentation is largely missing from unmanipulated, free-ranging populations. To investigate this relationship, we studied the brown booby (Sula leucogaster brewsteri), a seabird with a carotenoid-based gular skin ornament. 13C values from both feathers and blood plasma were negatively correlated with male gular color, indicating birds that...

Enchytraeid worm abundance and delta 13C cholesterol data from Sourhope field experiment site, Scotland, 2000 [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

H.I.J. Black, S.B. Piertney, C. Macdonald, V. Standen, I.D. Bull, R.P. Evershed, J.S. Chaplow & A.M. Thompson
This dataset comprises enchytraeid worm abundance and Delta 13C values from enchytraeid cholesterol. The data were collected as a component of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme, consisting of a one year study of the diversity and activity of Enchytraeid worms, small relatives of the earthworm. These worms are very common in upland soils and often outweigh all other fauna, including sheep. The project focused on investigating the importance of Enchytraeid species, or group diversity, in...

Data from: Group and kin recognition via olfactory cues in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

Stefanie Henkel & Joanna M. Setchell
Primates were traditionally thought to have a reduced sense of smell. Although there is now evidence that olfaction plays a greater role in primate social life than previously assumed, research on the sense of smell in non-human apes is scarce. Chimpanzees sniff the ground and vegetation on boundary patrols, but the function of this behaviour is unclear. Since chimpanzees are highly territorial and can kill individuals that do not belong to their own community, sniffing...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • Durham University
    14
  • University of Vienna
    3
  • Taizhou University
    3
  • University of Konstanz
    3
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2
  • University of Göttingen
    2
  • Charles University
    2
  • San Diego State University
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2