9 Works

Data from: Shifts and disruptions in resource-use trait syndromes during the evolution of herbaceous crops

Rubén Milla, Javier Morente-López, Jose Miguel Alonso-Rodrigo, Nieves Martín-Robles, , F. Stuart Chapin, N. Martin-Robles & J. Morente-Lopez
Trait-based ecology predicts that evolution in high-resource agricultural environments should select for suites of traits that enable fast resource acquisition and rapid canopy closure. However, crop breeding targets specific agronomic attributes rather than broad trait syndromes. Breeding for specific traits, together with evolution in high-resource environments, might lead to reduced phenotypic integration, according to predictions from the ecological literature. We provide the first comprehensive test of these hypotheses, based on a trait-screening programme of 30...

Data from: Differences in thallus chemistry are related to species-specific effects of biocrust-forming lichens on soil nutrients and microbial communities

Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, Antonio Gallardo, Felisa Covelo, Ana Prado-Comesaña, Victoria Ochoa & Fernando T. Maestre
1. It is well-known that vascular plants have species-specific effects on soil properties. However, little is known on how individual species forming biocrusts, communities dominated by lichens, mosses and cyanobacteria that are prevalent in many ecosystems world-wide, affect microbial communities and soil variables related to nutrient cycling. 2. We evaluated the relationship of six biocrust-forming lichens (Buellia epipolia, Diploschistes diacapsis, Fulgensia subbracteata, Psora decipiens, Squamarina cartilaginea and Squamarina lentigera) with microbial abundance and multiple variables...

Data from: Lichen traits responding to aridity

Paula Matos, Pedro Pinho, Gregorio Aragón, Isabel Martinez, Alice Nunes, Amadeu M. V. M. Soares & Cristina Branquinho
1. Climate change is expected to cause several impacts at the global scale and drylands will be among the most affected areas. Thus, investigating how these changes will affect the composition, structure and functioning of dryland ecosystems has become a priority. From an ecological indicator point of view, several works have shown that functional diversity is better than species richness to understand ecosystem functioning or response to environmental factors. However most of these works focus...

Data from: Untangling human and environmental effects on geographical gradients of mammal species richness: a global and regional evaluation

Erik Joaquin Torres-Romero & Miguel-Á Olalla-Tárraga
Different hypotheses (geographic, ecological, evolutionary or a combination of them) have been suggested to account for the spatial variation in species richness. However, the relative importance of environment and human impacts in explaining these patterns, either globally or at the biogeographic region level, remains largely unexplored. Here we jointly evaluate how current environmental conditions and human impacts shape global and regional gradients of species richness in terrestrial mammals. We processed IUCN global distributional data for...

Data from: Direct and indirect impacts of climate change on microbial and biocrust communities alter the resistance of the N cycle in a semiarid grassland

Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, Fernando T. Maestre, Cristina Escolar, Antonio Gallardo, Victoria Ochoa, Beatriz Gozalo & Ana Prado-Comesaña
1. Climate change will raise temperatures and modify precipitation patterns in drylands worldwide, affecting their structure and functioning. Despite the recognized importance of soil communities dominated by mosses, lichens and cyanobacteria (biocrusts) as a driver of nutrient cycling in drylands, little is known on how biocrusts will modulate the resistance (i.e., the amount of change caused by a disturbance) of the N cycle in response to climate change. 2. Here, we evaluate how warming (ambient...

Data from: Climate change will increase savannas at the expense of forests and treeless vegetation in tropical and subtropical Americas

José D. Anadon, Osvaldo E. Sala & Fernando T. Maestre
1. Transition areas between biomes are particularly sensitive to environmental changes. Our understanding of the impacts of ongoing climate change on terrestrial ecosystems has significantly increased during the last years. However, it is largely unknown how climatic change will affect transitions among major vegetation types. 2. We modelled the distribution of three alternative states (forest, savanna and treeless areas) in the tropical and subtropical Americas by means of climate-niche modelling. We studied how such distribution...

Data from: Diverse guilds provide complementary dispersal services in a woodland expansion process after land abandonment

Gema Escribano-Avila, María Calviño-Cancela, Beatriz Pías, Emilio Virgós, Fernando Valladares & Adrián Escudero
1. Land abandonment due to increasing depopulation of rural areas is an ongoing trend in developed countries worldwide. Abandoned lands represent an opportunity for ecosystem recovery, an urgent need for biodiversity conservation. Seed dispersal services provided by animals are a key feature for this process. Different dispersers may differentially contribute to plant recruitment under different ecological conditions, leading to complementary dispersal services. 2. We studied the dispersal services, quantified as the contribution to plant recruitment,...

Data from: Plant species richness and shrub cover attenuate drought effects on ecosystem functioning across Patagonian rangelands

Juan J. Gaitán, Donaldo Bran, Gabriel Oliva, Fernando T. Maestre, Martín R. Aguiar, Esteban Jobbágy, Gustavo Buono, Daniela Ferrante, Viviana Nakamatsu, Georgina Ciari, Jorge Salomone, Virginia Massara & E. Jobbagy
Drought is an increasingly common phenomenon in drylands as a consequence of climate change. We used 311 sites across a broad range of environmental conditions in Patagonian rangelands to evaluate how drought severity and temperature (abiotic factors) and vegetation structure (biotic factors) modulate the impact of a drought event on the annual integral of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI-I), our surrogate of ecosystem functioning. We found that NDVI-I decreases were larger with both increasing drought...

Data from: Environmental heterogeneity leads to higher plasticity in dry-edge populations of a semiarid Chilean shrub: insights into climate change responses

Ana Lázaro-Nogal, Silvia Matesanz, Alice Godoy, Fernanda Pérez-Trautman, Ernesto Gianoli & Fernando Valladares
1.Interannual variability in climatic conditions should be taken into account in climate change studies in semiarid ecosystems. It may determine differentiation in phenotypic plasticity among populations, with populations experiencing higher environmental heterogeneity showing higher levels of plasticity. 2.The ability of populations to evolve key functional traits and plasticity may determine the survival of plant populations under the drier and more variable climate expected for semiarid ecosystems. 3.Working with populations of the semiarid Chilean shrub Senna...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • King Juan Carlos University
    9
  • Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales
    2
  • Pablo de Olavide University
    2
  • Western Sydney University
    2
  • City University of New York
    1
  • Agricultural Plant Physiology and Ecology Research Institute
    1
  • National University of San Luis
    1
  • University of Lisbon
    1
  • University of La Serena
    1
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks
    1