6 Works

Data from: Secondary contact and local adaptation contribute to genome-wide patterns of clinal variation in Drosophila melanogaster

Alan O. Bergland, Ray Tobler, Josefa Gonzalez, Paul Schmidt, Dimitri A. Petrov & Dmitri Petrov
Populations arrayed along broad latitudinal gradients often show patterns of clinal variation in phenotype and genotype. Such population differentiation can be generated and maintained by both historical demographic events and local adaptation. These evolutionary forces are not mutually exclusive and can in some cases produce nearly identical patterns of genetic differentiation among populations. Here, we investigate the evolutionary forces that generated and maintain clinal variation genome-wide among populations of Drosophila melanogaster sampled in North America...

Data from: The impact of library preparation protocols on the accuracy of allele frequency estimates in Pool-Seq data

Robert Kofler, Viola Nolte & Christian Schlötterer
Sequencing pools of individuals (Pool-Seq) is a cost-effective method to determine genome-wide allele frequency estimates. Given the importance of meta-analyses combining data sets, we determined the influence of different genomic library preparation protocols on the consistency of allele frequency estimates. We found that typically no more than 1% of the variation in allele frequency estimates could be attributed to differences in library preparation. Also read length had only a minor effect on the consistency of...

Data from: Evolutionary factors affecting the cross-species utility of newly developed microsatellite markers in seabirds

Yoshan Moodley, Juan F. Masello, Gopi K. Munimanda, Theresa L. Cole, Marco R. Thali, Rachael Alderman, Richard J. Cuthbert, Manuel Marin, Melanie Massaro, Joan Navarro, Richard A. Phillips, Peter G. Ryan, Cristián G. Suazo, Yves Cherel, Henri Weimerskirch, Petra Quillfeldt & Luciano Calderon
Microsatellite loci are ideal for testing hypotheses relating to genetic segregation at fine spatio-temporal scales. They are also conserved among closely related species, making them potentially useful for clarifying interspecific relationships between recently diverged taxa. However, mutations at primer binding sites may lead to increased nonamplification, or disruptions that may result in decreased polymorphism in nontarget species. Furthermore, high mutation rates and constraints on allele size may also with evolutionary time, promote an increase in...

Data from: Seeking signatures of reinforcement at the genetic level: a hitchhiking mapping and candidate gene approach in the house mouse

Carole M. Smadja, Etienne Loire, Pierre Caminade, Marios Thoma, Yasmin Latour, Camille Roux, Michaela Thoss, Dustin J. Penn, Gulia Ganem & Pierre Boursot
Reinforcement is the process by which prezygotic isolation is strengthened as a response to selection against hybridization. Most empirical support for reinforcement comes from the observation of its possible phenotypic signature: an accentuated degree of prezygotic isolation in the hybrid zone as compared to allopatry. Here, we implemented a novel approach to this question by seeking for the signature of reinforcement at the genetic level. In the house mouse, selection against hybrids and enhanced olfactory-based...

Data from: The de novo genome assembly and annotation of a female domestic dromedary of North African origin

Robert R. Fitak, Elmira Mohandesan, Jukka Corander & Pamela A. Burger
The single-humped dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) is the most numerous and widespread of domestic camel species and is a significant source of meat, milk, wool, transportation and sport for millions of people. Dromedaries are particularly well adapted to hot, desert conditions and harbour a variety of biological and physiological characteristics with evolutionary, economic and medical importance. To understand the genetic basis of these traits, an extensive resource of genomic variation is required. In this study, we...

Data from: Spatially varying selection shapes life history clines among populations of Drosophila melanogaster from sub-Saharan Africa

Daniel K. Fabian, Justin B. Lack, Vinayak Mathur, Christian Schlötterer, Paul S. Schmidt, John E. Pool & Thomas Flatt
Clines in life history traits, presumably driven by spatially varying selection, are widespread. Major latitudinal clines have been observed, for example, in Drosophila melanogaster, an ancestrally tropical insect from Africa that has colonized temperate habitats on multiple continents. Yet, how geographic factors other than latitude, such as altitude or longitude, affect life history in this species remains poorly understood. Moreover, most previous work has been performed on derived European, American and Australian populations, but whether...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna
    6
  • University of Pennsylvania
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Stanford University
    1
  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    1
  • Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    1
  • Charles Sturt University
    1
  • Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
    1
  • University of Lausanne
    1
  • British Antarctic Survey
    1