3 Works

Data from: Divergence before the host shift? Prezygotic reproductive isolation among three varieties of a specialist fly on a single host plant

Alaine C. Hippee, Maren E. Elnes, Jarod S. Armenta, Marty A. Condon & Andrew A. Forbes
1. Although divergence via host-plant shifting is a common theme in the speciation of some phytophagous insects, it is not clear whether host shifts are typically initiators of speciation or if they instead contribute to divergence events already in progress. While host shifts appear to be generally associated with speciation events for flies in the genus Strauzia, three sympatric varieties of the sunflower fly [Strauzia longipennis (Wiedemann)] co-occur on the same host plant in the...

Data from: Genetic differentiation associated with host plants and geography among six widespread species of South American Blepharoneura fruit flies (Tephritidae)

Kristina Ottens, Isaac S. Winkler, Matthew L. Lewis, Sonja J. Scheffer, Gessica A. Gomes-Costa, Marty A. Condon & Andrew A. Forbes
Tropical herbivorous insects are astonishingly diverse and many are highly host-specific. Much evidence suggests that herbivorous insect diversity is a function of host-plant diversity; yet, the diversity of some lineages exceeds the diversity of plants. Although most species of herbivorous fruit flies in the Neotropical genus Blepharoneura are strongly host-specific (they deposit their eggs in a single host plant species and flower sex), some species are collected from multiple hosts or flowers and these may...

Data from: Anatomy of a neotropical insect radiation

Isaac Scott Winkler, Sonja J. Scheffer, Matthew L. Lewis, Kristina J. Ottens, Andrew P. Rasmussen, G├ęssica A. Gomes-Costa, Luz Maria Huerto Santillan, Marty A. Condon & Andrew A. Forbes
Background: Much evolutionary theory predicts that diversity arises via both adaptive radiation (diversification driven by selection against niche-overlap within communities) and divergence of geographically isolated populations. We focus on tropical fruit flies (Blepharoneura, Tephritidae) that reveal unexpected patterns of niche-overlap within local communities. Throughout the Neotropics, multiple sympatric non-interbreeding populations often share the same highly specialized patterns of host use (e.g., flies are specialists on flowers of a single gender of a single species of...

Registration Year

  • 2018
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Affiliations

  • Cornell College
    3
  • University of Iowa
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  • United States Department of Agriculture
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  • Federal University of Pernambuco
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  • National University of San Marcos
    1