37 Works

Data from: Does warming by open-top chambers induce change in the root-associated fungal community of the arctic dwarf shrub Cassiope tetragona (Ericaceae)?

Kelsey Erin Lorberau, Synnøve Smebye Botnen, Sunil Mundra, Anders Bjørnsgaard Aas, Jelte Rozema, Pernille Bronken Eidesen & Håvard Kauserud
Climate change may alter mycorrhizal communities, which impact ecosystem characteristics such as carbon sequestration processes. These impacts occur at a greater magnitude in Arctic ecosystems, where the climate is warming faster than in lower latitudes. Cassiope tetragona (L.) D. Don is an Arctic plant species in the Ericaceae family with a circumpolar range. C. tetragona has been reported to form ericoid mycorrhizal (ErM) as well as ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbioses. In this study, the fungal taxa...

Data from: Rapid polygenic response to secondary contact in a hybrid species

Glenn-Peter Sætre, Angelica Cuevas, Jo S. Hermansen, Tore O. Elgvin, Laura Piñeiro Fernández, Stein A. Sæther, Camilla Lo Cascio Sætre & Fabrice Eroukhmanoff
Secondary contact between closely related species can have genetic consequences. Competition for essential resources may lead to divergence in heritable traits that reduces interspecific competition, thus leading to increased genetic divergence. Conversely, hybridization and backcrossing can lead to genetic convergence. Here we study a population of a hybrid species, the Italian sparrow (Passer italiae), before and after it came into secondary contact with one of its parent species, the Spanish sparrow (P. hispaniolensis), in 2013....

Data from: Wood-inhabiting insects can function as targeted vectors for decomposer fungi

Rannveig Margrete Jacobsen, Håvard Kauserud, Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson, Marit Markussen Bjorbækmo & Tone Birkemoe
Most wood-inhabiting fungi are assumed to be dispersed primarily by wind, with the exception of a few species involved in mutualistic relationships with insects. In this study we tested whether several species of wood-inhabiting insects can function as dispersal vectors for non-mutualistic fungi, which would indicate that wood-inhabiting fungi can benefit from targeted animal-mediated dispersal. We sampled wood-inhabiting beetles (Coleoptera) from freshly felled wood experimentally added to forests and used DNA metabarcoding to investigate the...

Data from: Trait-dependent distributional shifts in fruiting of common British fungi

Alan C. Gange, Einar Heegaard, Lynne Boddy, Carrie Andrew, Paul Kirk, Rune Halvorsen, Thomas W. Kuyper, Claus Bässler, Jeffrey Diez, Jacob Heilman-Clausen, Klaus Høiland, Ulf Büntgen & Håvard Kauserud
Despite the dramatic phenological responses of fungal fruiting to recent climate warming, it is unknown whether spatial distributions of fungi have changed and to what extent such changes are influenced by fungal traits, such as ectomycorrhizal (ECM) or saprotrophic lifestyles, spore characteristics, or fruit body size. Our overall aim was to understand how climate and fungal traits determine whether and how species-specific fungal fruit body abundances have shifted across latitudes over time, using the UK...

Data from: Salinity-induced phenotypic plasticity in threespine stickleback sperm activation

Annette Taugbøl, Anna B. Mazzarella, Emily R.A. Cramer, Terje Laskemoen & Emily R. A. Cramer
Phenotypic expression may be and often is influenced by an organism’s developmental environment, referred to as phenotypic plasticity. The sperm cells of teleosts have been found to be inactive in the seminal plasma and are activated by osmotic shock for most fish species, through release in either hypertonic (for marine fish) or hypotonic (for freshwater fish) water. If this is the case, the regulatory system of sperm mobility should be reversed in salt and freshwater...

Data from: Range contraction and increasing isolation of a polar bear subpopulation in an era of sea-ice loss

Kristin L. Laidre, Erik W. Born, Stephen N. Atkinson, Øystein Wiig, Liselotte W. Andersen, Nicholas J. Lunn, Markus Dyck, Eric V. Regehr, Richard McGovern & Patrick Heagerty
Climate change is expected to result in range shifts and habitat fragmentation for many species. In the Arctic, loss of sea ice will reduce barriers to dispersal or eliminate movement corridors, resulting in increased connectivity or geographic isolation with sweeping implications for conservation. We used satellite telemetry, data from individually marked animals (research and harvest), and microsatellite genetic data to examine changes in geographic range, emigration, and interpopulation connectivity of the Baffin Bay (BB) polar...

Data from: Immigrant reproductive dysfunction facilitates ecological speciation

Ola Svensson, Johanna Gräns, Malin C. Celander, Jonathan Havenhand, Erica H. Leder, Kai Lindström, Sofie Schöld, Cock Van Oosterhout & Charlotta Kvarnemo
The distributions of species are not only determined by where they can survive – they must also be able to reproduce. Although immigrant inviability is a well-established concept, the fact that immigrants also need to be able to effectively reproduce in foreign environments has not been fully appreciated in the study of adaptive divergence and speciation. Fertilization and reproduction are sensitive life history stages that could be detrimentally affected for immigrants in non-native habitats. We...

Data from: Ancient DNA reveals the Arctic origin of Viking Age cod from Haithabu, Germany

Bastiaan Star, Sanne Boessenkool, Agata T. Gondek, Elena A. Nikulina, Anne Karin Hufthammer, Christophe Pampoelie, Halvor Knutsen, Carl Andre, Heidi M. Nistelberger, Jan Dierking, Christoph Petereit, Dirk Heinrich, Kjetill S. Jakobsen, Nils Chr. Stenseth, Sissel Jentoft & James H. Barrett
Knowledge of the range and chronology of historic trade and long-distance transport of natural resources is essential for determining the impacts of past human activities on marine environments. However, the specific biological sources of imported fauna are often difficult to identify, in particular if species have a wide spatial distribution and lack clear osteological or isotopic differentiation between populations. Here, we report that ancient fish-bone remains, despite being porous, brittle, and light, provide an excellent...

Data from: A structured training program for health workers in intravenous treatment with fluids and antibiotics in nursing homes: a modified stepped-wedge cluster-randomised trial to reduce hospital admissions

Maria Romøren, Svein Gjelstad & Morten Lindbæk
Objectives: Hospitalization is potentially detrimental to nursing home patients and resource demanding for the specialist health care. This study assessed if a brief training program in administrating intravenous fluids and antibiotics in nursing homes could reduce hospital transfers and ensure high quality care locally. Design: A pragmatic and modified cluster randomized stepped-wedge trial with randomization on nursing home level. Participants: 330 cases in 296 nursing home residents from 30 nursing homes were included. Cases were...

Data from: Novel adverse outcome pathways revealed by chemical genetics in a developing marine fish

Elin Sørhus, John P. Incardona, Tomasz Furmanek, Giles W. Goetz, Nathaniel L. Scholz, Sonnich Meier, Rolf B. Edvardsen & Sissel Jentoft
Crude oil spills are a worldwide ocean conservation threat. Fish are particularly vulnerable to the oiling of spawning habitats, and crude oil causes severe abnormalities in embryos and larvae. However, the underlying mechanisms for these developmental defects are not well understood. Here, we explore the transcriptional basis for four discrete crude oil injury phenotypes in the early life stages of the commercially important Atlantic haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus). These include defects in (1) cardiac form and...

Data from: On the missing link in ecology: improving communication between modellers and experimentalists

Jan Heuschele, Mikael T. Ekvall, Patrizio Mariani & Christian Lindemann
Collaboration between modellers and experimentalists is essential in ecological research, however, different obstacles linking both camps often hinder scientific progress. In this commentary, we discuss several issues of the current state of affairs in this research loop. Backed by an online survey amongst fellow ecologists, modellers and experimentalists alike, we identify two major areas that need to be mended. Firstly, differences in language and jargon lead to a lack of exchange of ideas and to...

Data from: Is telomere length associated with mate choice in a songbird with a high rate of extra-pair paternity?

Arild Johnsen, Angela Pauliny, Jan T. Lifjeld & Donald Blomqvist
Telomere length is related to aging in many eukaryotes and the rate of telomere attrition has been suggested to reflect individual genetic quality. Telomere length could thus have implications for mate choice. We investigated telomere length variation in bluethroat Luscinia svecica families with mixed paternity, including social parents, extra-pair fathers and nestlings, testing whether telomere length is associated with social and/or extra-pair mate choice through assortative mating or selection of mates with relatively long telomeres....

Data from: Millions of years behind: slow adaptation of ruminants to grasslands

Olja Toljagić, Kjetil L. Voje, Michael Matschiner, Lee H. Liow & Thomas F. Hansen
The Late-Cretaceous appearance of grasses, followed by the Cenozoic advancement of grasslands as dominant biomes, has contributed to the evolution of a range of specialized herbivores adapted to new diets, as well as to increasingly open and arid habitats. Many mammals including ruminants, the most diversified ungulate suborder, evolved high–crowned (hypsodont) teeth as an adaptation to tooth–wearing diets and habitats. The impact of different causes of tooth wear is still a matter of debate, and...

Data from: A giant spurrey on a tiny island: on the phylogenetic position of Sanctambrosia manicata (Caryophyllaceae) and the generic circumscriptions of Spergula, Spergularia and Rhodalsine

Anneleen Kool & Mats Thulin
The only member of the generally herbaceous family Caryophyllaceae that may grow to a small tree is Sanctambrosia manicata, endemic to remote San Ambrosio Island, off the coast of Chile. The monospecific Sanctambrosia has been suggested to be closely related to Spergula and Spergularia (spurreys) on the basis of morphology, despite its treelike habit and gynodioecy. A plastid DNA dataset (ndhF, rps16, trnL-F) is used to investigate the relationships of Sanctambrosia and other members of...

Data from: Comparative authentication of Hypericum perforatum herbal products using DNA metabarcoding, TLC and HPLC-MS

Ancuta Cristina Raclariu, Ramona Paltinean, Laurian Vlase, Aurelie Labarre, Vincent Manzanilla, Mihael Cristin Ichim, Gianina Crisan, Anne Krag Brysting & Hugo De Boer
Many herbal products have a long history of use, but there are increasing concerns over product efficacy, safety and quality in the wake of recent cases exposing discrepancies between labeling and constituents. When it comes to St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) herbal products, there is limited oversight, frequent off-label use and insufficient monitoring of adverse drug reactions. In this study, we use amplicon metabarcoding (AMB) to authenticate 78 H. perforatum herbal products and evaluate...

Data from: Pushing the limits of photoreception in twilight conditions: The rod-like cone retina of the deep-sea pearlsides

Fanny De Busserolles, Fabio Cortesi, Jon Vidar Helvik, Wayne I. L. Davies, Rachel M. Templin, Robert K. P. Sullivan, Craig T. Michell, Jessica K. Mountford, Shaun P. Collin, Xabier Irigoien, Stein Kaartvedt & Justin Marshall
Most vertebrates have a duplex retina comprising two photoreceptor types, rods for dim-light (scotopic) vision and cones for bright-light (photopic) and color vision. However, deep-sea fishes are only active in dim-light conditions; hence, most species have lost their cones in favor of a simplex retina composed exclusively of rods. Although the pearlsides, Maurolicus spp., have such a pure rod retina, their behavior is at odds with this simplex visual system. Contrary to other deep-sea fishes,...

Data from: Fungal communities in Scandinavian lakes along a longitudinal gradient

Maryia Khomich, Marie L. Davey, Håvard Kauserud, Serena Rasconi & Tom Andersen
This study investigates the diversity and distribution of fungal communities in 77 oligotrophic lakes in southern Norway and Sweden using 454-sequencing with fungal-specific primers targeting ITS2 region of the rRNA gene. A total of 232 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to four recognized phyla were detected. A large proportion (70.69%) of the detected OTUs were Dikarya (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota), while Chytridiomycota dominated quantitatively (63.37% reads). The most abundant aquatic fungi were taxonomically assigned to Chytridiomycota,...

Data from: Mapping and analysis of the connectome of sympathetic premotor neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of the rat using a volumetric brain atlas

Bowen Dempsey, Sheng Le, Anita Turner, Phill Bokiniec, Radhika Ramadas, Jan G. Bjaalie, Clement Menuet, Rachael Neve, Andrew Allen, Ann Goodchild, Simon McMullan, Phil Bokiniec, Ann K. Goodchild & Andrew M. Allen
Spinally projecting neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a critical role in the generation of vasomotor sympathetic tone and are thought to receive convergent input from neurons at every level of the neuraxis; the factors that determine their ongoing activity remain unresolved. In this study we use a genetically restricted viral tracing strategy to definitively map their spatially diffuse connectome. We infected bulbospinal RVLM neurons with recombinant rabies variant that drives reporter expression...

Data from: Mutation predicts 40 million years of fly wing evolution

David Houle, Geir H. Bolstad, Kim Van Der Linde & Thomas F. Hansen
Mutation enables evolution, but the idea that adaptation is also shaped by mutational variation is controversial. Simple evolutionary hypotheses predict such a relationship if the supply of mutations constrains evolution, but it is not clear that constraints exist, and, even if they do, they may be overcome by long-term natural selection. Quantification of the relationship between mutation and phenotypic divergence among species will help to resolve these issues. Here we use precise data on over...

Data from: Genome architecture enables local adaptation of Atlantic cod despite high connectivity

Julia M. I. Barth, Paul R. Berg, Per R. Jonsson, Sara Bonanomi, Hanna Corell, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen, Kjetill S. Jakobsen, Kerstin Johannesson, Per Erik Jorde, Halvor Knutsen, Per-Olav Moksnes, Bastiaan Star, Nils Chr. Stenseth, Henrik Svedäng, Sissel Jentoft & Carl André
Adaptation to local conditions is a fundamental process in evolution; however, mechanisms maintaining local adaptation despite high gene flow are still poorly understood. Marine ecosystems provide a wide array of diverse habitats that frequently promote ecological adaptation even in species characterized by strong levels of gene flow. As one example, populations of the marine fish Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are highly connected due to immense dispersal capabilities but nevertheless show local adaptation in several key...

Data from: Spatial mismatch between management units and movement ecology of a partially migratory ungulate

Erling L. Meisingset, Leif Egil Loe, Øystein Brekkum, Richard Bischof, Inger Maren Rivrud, Unni Støbet Lande, Barbara Zimmermann, Vebjørn Veiberg & Atle Mysterud
1. Population-level management is difficult to achieve if wildlife routinely crosses administrative boundaries, as is particularly frequent for migratory populations. However, the degree of mismatch between management units and scales at which ecological processes operate has rarely been quantified. Such insight is vital for delimiting functional population units of partially migratory species common in northern forest ecosystems. 2. We combined an extensive dataset of 412 GPS-marked red deer (Cervus elaphus) across Norway with information on...

Data from: The fungus that came in from the cold: dry rot’s pre-adapted ability to invade buildings

Sudhagard V. Balasundaram, Jaqueline Hess, Michael B. Durling, S. C. Moody, Lisbeth Thorbek, Cinzia Progida, Kurt LaButti, Andrea Aerts, Kerrie Barry, Igor V. Grigoriev, Lynne Boddy, Nils Högberg, Håvard Kauserud, Daniel C. Eastwood & Inger Skrede
Many organisms benefit from being pre-adapted to niches shaped by human activity, and have successfully invaded man-made habitats. One such species is the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans, which has a wide distribution in buildings in temperate and boreal regions, where it decomposes coniferous construction wood. Comparative genomic analyses and growth experiments using this species and its wild relatives revealed that S. lacrymans evolved a very effective brown rot decay compared to its wild relatives,...

Data from: Genetic effects on life-history traits in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

Anne Duplouy, Swee Chong Wong, Jukka Corander, Rainer Lehtonen & Ilkka Hanski
Background: Adaptation to local habitat conditions may lead to the natural divergence of populations in life-history traits such as body size, time of reproduction, mate signaling or dispersal capacity. Given enough time and strong enough selection pressures, populations may experience local genetic differentiation. The genetic basis of many life-history traits, and their evolution according to different environmental conditions remain however poorly understood. Methods: We conducted an association study on the Glanville fritillary butterfly, using material...

Data from: Fungal communities influence decomposition rates of plant litter from two dominant trees species

Johan Asplund, Håvard Kauserud, Stef Bokhorst, Marit H. Lie, Mikael Ohlson & Line Nybakken
The home-field advantage hypothesis (HFA) predicts that plant litter decomposes faster than expected underneath the plant from which it originates. We tested this hypothesis in a decomposition experiment where litters were incubated reciprocally in neighbouring European beech and Norway spruce forests. We analysed fungal communities in the litter through DNA metabarcoding and evaluated the effect of mesofauna (mites and springtails) on litter mass loss by using different litter-bag mesh sizes. Accounting for general differences in...

Data from: Migration in geographic and ecological space by a large herbivore

Wibke Peters, Mark Hebblewhite, Atle Mysterud, Derek Spitz, Stefano Focardi, Ferdinando Urbano, Nicolas Morellet, Marco Heurich, Petter Kjellander, John D.C. Linnell, Francesca Cagnacci & John D. C. Linnell
Partial migration, when only part of the population migrates seasonally while the other part remains resident on the shared range, is the most common form of migration in ungulates. Migration is often defined by spatial separation of seasonal ranges and consequently, classification of individuals as migrants or residents is usually only based on geographic criteria. However, the underlying mechanism for migration is hypothesized to be movement in response to spatiotemporal resource variability and thus, migrants...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    37

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    37

Affiliations

  • University of Oslo
    37
  • University of Gothenburg
    5
  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    4
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    4
  • University of Agder
    3
  • University of Bergen
    3
  • Uppsala University
    3
  • Norwegian Institute of Marine Research
    3
  • VU University Amsterdam
    2
  • Duke University
    2