4,795 Works

Data from: Hybridization, species collapse, and species reemergence after disturbance to premating mechanisms of reproductive isolation

Robert Tucker Gilman & Jocelyn Elyssa Behm
There are now a number of well-studied cases in which hybridization between closely related sympatric species has increased, sometimes resulting in the replacement of species pairs by hybrid swarms. Many of these cases have been linked to anthropogenic environmental change, but the mechanisms leading from environmental change to species collapse, and the long-term effects of hybridization on species pairs, remain poorly understood. We used an individual-based stochastic simulation model to explore the conditions under which...

Data from: Identification of X-linked quantitative trait loci affecting cold tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster and fine-mapping by selective sweep analysis

Nicolas Svetec, Annegret Werzner, Ricardo Wilches, Pavlos Pavlidis, José M. Álvarez-Castro, Karl W. Broman, Dirk Metzler & Wolfgang Stephan
Drosophila melanogaster is a cosmopolitan species that colonizes a great variety of environments. One trait that shows abundant evidence for naturally segregating genetic variance in different populations of D. melanogaster is cold tolerance. Previous work has found quantitative trait loci (QTL) exclusively on the second and the third chromosomes. To gain insight into the genetic architecture of cold tolerance on the X chromosome and to compare the results with our analyses of selective sweeps, a...

Data from: Pumping ions: rapid parallel evolution of ionic regulation following habitat invasions

Carol Eunmi Lee, Michael Kiergaard, Gregory William Gelembiuk, Brian Donovan Eads & Marijan Posavi
Marine to freshwater colonizations constitute among the most dramatic evolutionary transitions in the history of life. This study examined evolution of ionic regulation following saline-to-freshwater transitions in an invasive species. In recent years, the copepod Eurytemora affinis has invaded freshwater habitats multiple times independently. We found parallel evolutionary shifts in ion-motive enzyme activity (V-type H+ ATPase, Na+/K+-ATPase) across independent invasions and in replicate laboratory selection experiments. Freshwater populations exhibited increased V-type H+ ATPase activity in...

Data from: Behavior and nutritional condition buffer a large-bodied endotherm against direct and indirect effects of climate

Ryan A. Long, R. Terry Bowyer, Warren P. Porter, Paul Mathewson, Kevin Lee Monteith & John G. Kie
Temporal changes in net energy balance of animals strongly influence fitness; consequently, natural selection should favor behaviors that increase net energy balance by buffering individuals against negative effects of environmental variation. The relative importance of behavioral responses to climate-induced variation in costs versus supplies of energy, however, is uncertain, as is the degree to which such responses are mediated by current stores of energy. We evaluated relationships among behavior, nutritional condition (i.e., energetic state), and...

Data from: Characterization of 42 polymorphic microsatellite loci in Mimulus ringens (Phrymaceae) using Illumina sequencing

Schyler O. Nunziata, Jeffrey D. Karron, Randall J. Mitchell, Stacey L. Lance, Kenneth L. Jones & Dorset W. Trapnell
Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were isolated and characterized in Mimulus ringens (Phrymaceae), a herbaceous wetland perennial, to facilitate studies of mating patterns and population genetic structure. Methods and Results: A total of 42 polymorphic loci were identified from a sample of 24 individuals from a single popula- tion in Ohio, USA. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to nine, and median observed heterozygosity was 0.435. Conclusions: This large number of...

Data from: Daily foraging patterns in free-living birds: exploring the predation-starvation trade-off

David N. Bonter, Benjamin Zuckerberg, Carolyn W. Sedgwick & Wesley M. Hochachka
Daily patterns in the foraging behaviour of birds are assumed to balance the counteracting risks of predation and starvation. Predation risks are a function of the influence of weight on flight performance and foraging behaviours that may expose individuals to predators. Although recent research sheds light on daily patterns in weight gain, little data exist on daily foraging routines in free-living birds. In order to test the predictions of various hypotheses about daily patterns of...

Data from: The estimation of tree posterior probabilities using conditional clade probability distributions

Bret Larget
In this paper I introduce the idea of conditional independence of separated subtrees as a principle by which to estimate the posterior probability of trees using conditional clade probability distributions rather than simple sample relative frequencies. I describe an algorithm for these calculations and software which implements these ideas. I show that these alternative calculations are very similar to simple sample relative frequencies for high probability trees, but are substantially more accurate for relatively low...

Data from: Identification of X-linked quantitative trait loci affecting cold tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster and fine-mapping by selective sweep analysis

Nicolas Svetec, Annegret Werzner, Ricardo Wilches, Pavlos Pavlidis, José M. Álvarez-Castro, Karl W. Broman, Dirk Metzler & Wolfgang Stephan
Drosophila melanogaster is a cosmopolitan species that colonizes a great variety of environments. One trait that shows abundant evidence for naturally segregating genetic variance in different populations of D. melanogaster is cold tolerance. Previous work has found quantitative trait loci (QTL) exclusively on the second and the third chromosomes. To gain insight into the genetic architecture of cold tolerance on the X chromosome and to compare the results with our analyses of selective sweeps, a...

Data from: A Palaeozoic stem-group to mite harvestmen revealed through integration of phylogenetics and development

Russell J. Garwood, Prashant P. Sharma, Jason A. Dunlop & Gonzalo Giribet
Successfully placing fossils in phylogenies is integral to understanding the tree of life. Crown-group Paleozoic members of the arachnid order Opiliones are indicative of ancient origins and one of the earliest arthropod terrestrialization events. Opiliones epitomize morphological stasis, and all known fossils have been placed within the four extant suborders. Here we report a Carboniferous harvestman species, Hastocularis argusgen. nov., sp. nov., reconstructed with microtomography (microCT). Phylogenetic analysis recovers this species, and the Devonian Eophalangium...

Data from: Species richness of wild bees, but not the use of managed honey bees, increases fruit set of a pollinator-dependent crop

Rachel E. Mallinger & Claudio Gratton
1. Native, wild bees are important pollinators for both crop and wild plants. With concerns over the availability and cost of managed honey bees, attention has turned to native, wild bees as crop pollinators. However, the ability of native, wild bees to provide sufficient pollination may depend on their populations at local scales. 2. Therefore, at the farm scale, we examined the pollination contribution of both native, wild bees and managed honey bees to apples,...

Data from: Convergence of soil nitrogen isotopes across global climate gradients

Joseph M. Craine, Andrew J. Elmore, Lixin Wang, Laurent Augusto, W. Troy Baisden, E. N. J. Brookshire, Michael D. Cramer, Niles J. Hasselquist, Erik A. Hobbie, Ansgar Kahmen, Keisuke Koba, J. Marty Kranabetter, Michelle C. Mack, Erika Marin-Spiotta, Jordan R. Mayor, Kendra K. McLauchlan, Anders Michelsen, Gabriela B. Nardoto, Rafael S. Oliveira, Steven S. Perakis, Pablo L. Peri, Carlos A. Quesada, Andreas Richter, Louis A. Schipper, Bryan A. Stevenson … & Bernd Zeller
Quantifying global patterns of terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycling is central to predicting future patterns of primary productivity, carbon sequestration, nutrient fluxes to aquatic systems, and climate forcing. With limited direct measures of soil N cycling at the global scale, syntheses of the 15N:14N ratio of soil organic matter across climate gradients provide key insights into understanding global patterns of N cycling. In synthesizing data from over 6000 soil samples, we show strong global relationships among...

Data from: Fire may mediate effects of landscape connectivity on plant community richness in prairie remnants

Amy O. Alstad & Ellen I. Damschen
Following the predictions of island biogeography and metapopulation theory, efforts to understand and maintain plant communities have focused on spatial attributes such as patch size and connectivity. However, despite a large body of literature, the effects of these spatial attributes remain uncertain, and accumulating evidence suggests that they may interact with local patch characteristics. Here, we assess the role of spatial attributes (patch size and connectivity at two time periods) and of patch quality (indicated...

Data from: Selection of Pairings Reaching Evenly Across the Data (SPREAD): a simple algorithm to design maximally informative fully crossed mating experiments

Kolea Zimmerman, Daniel Levitis, Ethan Addicott & Anne Pringle
We present a novel algorithm for the design of crossing experiments. The algorithm identifies a set of individuals (a "crossing-set") from a larger pool of potential crossing-sets by maximizing the diversity of traits of interest, for example, maximizing the range of genetic and geographic distances between individuals included in the crossing-set. To calculate diversity, we use the mean nearest neighbor distance of crosses plotted in trait space. We implement our algorithm on a real dataset...

Data from: Habitat, predators, and hosts regulate disease in Daphnia through direct and indirect pathways

Alexander T. Strauss, Marta S. Shocket, David J. Civitello, Jessica L. Hite, Rachel M. Penczykowski, Meghan A. Duffy, Carla E. Cáceres & Spencer R. Hall
Community ecology can link habitat to disease via interactions among habitat, focal hosts, other hosts, their parasites, and predators. However, complicated food web interactions (i.e., trophic interactions among predators, and their impacts on host density and diversity) often obscure the important pathways regulating disease. Here, we disentangle community drivers in a case study of planktonic disease, using a two-step approach. In step one, we tested univariate field patterns linking community interactions to two disease metrics....

Data from: Ontogenetic responses of four plant species to additive and interactive effects of land-use history, canopy structure and herbivory

Philip G. Hahn & John L. Orrock
The strength of interactions among species is often highly variable in space and time, and a major challenge in understanding context-dependent effects of herbivores lies in disentangling habitat-mediated from herbivore-mediated effects on plant performance. We conducted a landscape-scale experiment that manipulated light availability in woodlands with either a history of agricultural use or no history of agricultural use and coupled this with performance measurements of three life stages on four perennial herbaceous species exposed to...

Data from: The role of cis regulatory evolution in maize domestication

Zachary H. Lemmon, Robert Bukowski, Qi Sun & John F. Doebley
Gene expression differences between divergent lineages caused by modification of cis regulatory elements are thought to be important in evolution. We assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, using deep RNA sequencing in F1 hybrid and parent inbred lines for three tissue types (ear, leaf and stem). Pervasive regulatory variation was observed with approximately 70% of ~17,000 genes showing evidence of regulatory divergence between maize and teosinte. However,...

Data from: Female discrimination thresholds frequently exceed local male display variation: implications for mate choice dynamics and sexual selection

Gerlinde Höbel
Among the factors that can influence female mate choice decisions is the degree to which females differentiate among similar displays: as differences decrease, females are expected to eventually stop discriminating. This discrimination threshold, in conjunction with the magnitude of male trait variation females regularly encounter while making mate choice decisions, may have important consequences for sexual selection. If local display variation is above the discrimination threshold, female preferences should translate into higher mating success for...

Data from: Phylogenomics and historical biogeography of the monocot order Liliales: out of Australia and through Antarctica

Thomas J. Givnish, Alejandro Zuluaga, Isabel Marques, Vivienne K. Y. Lam, Marybel Soto Gomez, William J. D. Iles, Mercedes Ames, Daniel Spalink, Jackson R. Moeller, Barbara G. Briggs, Stephanie P. Lyon, Dennis W. Stevenson, Wendy Zomlefer & Sean W. Graham
We present the first phylogenomic analysis of relationships among all ten families of Liliales, based on 75 plastid genes from 35 species in 29 genera, and 97 additional plastomes stratified across angiosperm lineages. We used a supermatrix approach to extend our analysis to 58 of 64 genera of Liliales, and calibrated the resulting phylogeny against 17 fossil dates to produce a new timeline for monocot evolution. Liliales diverged from other monocots 124 Mya and began...

Data from: Nematode-bacteria nutualism: selection within the mutualism supersedes selection outside of the mutualism

Levi T. Morran, McKenna J. Penley, Victoria S. Byrd, Andrew J. Meyer, Timothy S. O'Sullivan, Farrah Bashey-Visser, Heidi Goodrich-Blair, Curtis M. Lively & Farrah Bashey
The coevolution of interacting species can lead to codependent mutualists. Little is known about the effect of selection on partners within verses apart from the association. Here, we determined the effect of selection on bacteria (Xenorhabdus nematophila) both within and apart from its mutualistic partner (a nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae). In nature, the two species cooperatively infect and kill arthropods. We passaged the bacteria either together with (M+), or isolated from (M−), nematodes under two different...

Data from: Blood does not buy goodwill: allowing culling increases poaching of a large carnivore

Guillaume Chapron & Adrian Treves
Quantifying environmental crime and the effectiveness of policy interventions is difficult because perpetrators typically conceal evidence. To prevent illegal uses of natural resources, such as poaching endangered species, governments have advocated granting policy flexibility to local authorities by liberalizing culling or hunting of large carnivores. We present the first quantitative evaluation of the hypothesis that liberalizing culling will reduce poaching and improve population status of an endangered carnivore. We show that allowing wolf (Canis lupus)...

Data from: Statistical evidence for common ancestry: application to primates

David A. Baum, Cécile Ané, Bret Larget, Claudia Solís-Lemus, Lam Si Tung Ho, Peggy Boone, Chloe Drummond, Martin Bontrager, Steven Hunter, Bill Saucier, Chloe P. Drummond, Steven J. Hunter & William Saucier
Since Darwin, biologists have come to recognize that the theory of descent from common ancestry is very well supported by diverse lines of evidence. However, while the qualitative evidence is overwhelming, we also need formal methods for quantifying the evidential support for common ancestry (CA) over the alternative hypothesis of separate ancestry (SA). In this paper we explore a diversity of statistical methods, using data from the primates. We focus on two alternatives to CA,...

Data from: Whole genome duplication in coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) and its implications for explaining the rarity of polyploidy in conifers

Alison Dawn Scott, Noah W. M. Stenz, Pär K. Ingvarsson & David A. Baum
Polyploidy is common and an important evolutionary factor in most land plant lineages, but it is rare in gymnosperms. Coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) is one of just two polyploid conifer species and the only hexaploid. Evidence from fossil guard cell size suggests that polyploidy in Sequoia dates to the Eocene. Numerous hypotheses about the mechanism of polyploidy and parental genome donors have been proposed, based primarily on morphological and cytological data, but it remains unclear...

Data from: Phytochemical traits underlie genotypic variation in susceptibility of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) to browsing by a keystone forest ungulate

Liza Holeski, Sean McKenzie, Eric Kruger, John J. Couture, Kennedy Rubert-Nason, Richard L. Lindroth, Liza M. Holeski, Sean C. McKenzie & Eric L. Kruger
1.Overbrowsing by ungulates is a major cause of poor aspen stand regeneration across North America and Eurasia. In general, factors driving ungulate browser preferences include concentrations of plant secondary compounds and the nutritional composition (non-structural carbohydrates, protein, and minerals) of foliage. While each of these phytochemical factors has been shown to independently influence ungulate preference, the relative impact of each factor is unknown, as no study to date has examined them simultaneously. 2.Plant fitness depends...

Data from: Fire severity unaffected by spruce beetle outbreak in spruce-fir forests in southwestern Colorado

Robert A. Andrus, Thomas T. Veblen, Brian J. Harvey & Sarah J. Hart
Recent large and severe outbreaks of native bark beetles have raised concern among the general public and land managers about potential for amplified fire activity in western North America. To date, the majority of studies examining bark beetle outbreaks and subsequent fire severity in the U.S. Rocky Mountains have focused on outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae) in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests, but few studies, particularly field studies, have addressed the effects...

Data from: Exploring tree-like and non-tree-like patterns using genome sequences: an example using the inbreeding plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

Noah Stenz, Bret Larget, David A. Baum & Cécile Ané
Genome sequence data contain abundant information about genealogical history, but methods for extracting and interpreting this information are not yet fully developed. We analyzed genome sequences for multiple accessions of the selfing plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, with the goal of better understanding its genealogical history. As expected from accessions of the same species, we found much discordance between nuclear gene trees. Nonetheless, we inferred the optimal population tree under the assumption that all discordance is due...

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