3 Works

Data from: Structure-function covariation with nonfeeding ecological variables influences evolution of feeding specialization in Carnivora

Jack Tseng & John J. Flynn
Skull shape convergence is pervasive among vertebrates. Although this is frequently inferred to indicate similar functional underpinnings, neither the specific structure-function linkages nor the selective environments in which the supposed functional adaptations arose are commonly identified and tested. We demonstrate that nonfeeding factors relating to sexual maturity and precipitation-related arboreality also can generate structure-function relationships in the skulls of carnivorans (dogs, cats, seals, and relatives) through covariation with masticatory performance. We estimated measures of masticatory...

Data from: Whole-genome analysis of Mustela erminea finds that pulsed hybridization impacts evolution at high-latitudes

Jocelyn P Colella, Tian-Ying Lan, Stephan C Schuster, Sandra L Talbot, Joseph A Cook & Charlotte Lindqvist
At high-latitude, climatic shifts hypothetically drove episodes of divergence during isolation in glacial refugia, or ice-free pockets of land that enabled terrestrial species persistence. Upon glacial recession, populations can expand and often come into contact, resulting in admixture between previously isolated groups. To understand how recurrent periods of isolation and contact have impacted evolution at high latitudes, we investigated introgression in the stoat (Mustela erminea), a Holarctic mammalian carnivore, using whole-genome sequences. We identify two...

Data from: Acquisition of obligate mutualist symbionts during the larval stage is not beneficial for a coral host

Aaron Hartmann, Kristen Marhaver, Anke Klueter, Michael Lovci, Collin Closek, Erika Diaz Almeyda, Valerie Chamberland, Frederick Archer, Dimitri Deheyn, Mark Vermeij & Monica Medina
Theory suggests that the direct transmission of endosymbionts from parents to offspring (vertical transmission) in animal hosts is advantageous and evolutionarily stable, yet many host species instead acquire their symbionts from the environment (horizontal acquisition). An outstanding question in marine biology is why some scleractinian corals do not provision their eggs and larvae with the endosymbiotic dinoflagellates that are necessary for a juvenile’s ultimate survival. We tested whether the acquisition of photosynthetic endosymbionts (family Symbiodiniaceae)...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • University at Buffalo, State University of New York
    3
  • University of California, San Diego
    1
  • Caribbean Research and Management of Biodiversity Foundation
    1
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    1
  • United States Geological Survey
    1
  • American Museum of Natural History
    1
  • Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering
    1
  • Pennsylvania State University
    1
  • Scripps Institution of Oceanography
    1