37 Works

Mycorrhizal phosphorus efficiencies and microbial competition drive root P uptake

Simon Clausing & Andrea Polle
Phosphorus (P) availability shows large differences among different soil types, affecting P nutrition of forest trees. Chemical binding of P to soil moieties affects partitioning of P between soil particles and solution, affecting soluble P concentrations upon which plants, their associated mycorrhizal symbionts, and microbes feed. The goal of this study was to characterize root P uptake by mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal root tips in competition with microbes in situ in the organic and mineral layer...

Data from: Bird diversity and endemism along a land-use gradient in Madagascar: the conservation value of vanilla agroforests

Dominic Andreas Martin, Rouvah Andriafanomezantsoa, Saskia Dröge, Kristina Osen, Eric Rakotomalala, Annemarie Wurz, Aristide Andrianarimisa & Holger Kreft
Land-use change is the most important driver of biodiversity loss worldwide and particularly so in the tropics, where natural habitats are transformed into large-scale monocultures or heterogeneous landscape mosaics of largely unknown conservation value. Using birds as an indicator taxon, we evaluated the conservation value of a landscape mosaic in north-eastern Madagascar, a biodiversity hotspot and the center of global vanilla production. We assessed bird species richness and composition by conducting point counts across seven...

In the shadows of snow leopards and the Himalayas: density and habitat selection of blue sheep in Manang, Nepal

Marc Filla, Rinzin Phunjok Lama, Tashi Rapte Ghale, Johannes Signer, Tim Filla, Raja Ram Aryal, Marco Heurich, Matthias Waltert, Niko Balkenhol & Igor Khorozyan
There is a growing agreement that conservation needs to be proactive and pay increased attention to common species and to the threats they face. The blue sheep (Pseudois nayaur) plays a key ecological role in sensitive high-altitude ecosystems of Central Asia and is among the main prey species for the globally vulnerable snow leopard (Panthera uncia). As the blue sheep has been increasingly exposed to human pressures, it is vital to estimate its population dynamics,...

Magnetotelluric data for the Halloween 2003 magnetic storm in the vicinity of Uppsala and Eskdalemuir geomagnetic observatories (synthesized using geomagnetic observatory data from INTERMAGNET)

Fiona Simpson & Karsten Bahr
Magnetotelluric data for the Halloween 2003 magnetic storm in the vicinity of Uppsala (UPS), Sweden and Eskdalemuir (ESK), Scotland geomagnetic observatories synthesized from geomagnetic observatory data from INTERMAGNET. The data were generated to facilitate comparison of the ground effects of the Halloween 2003 magnetic storm in Sweden and Scotland. The data demonstrate the greater risk of hazardous storm-time electric fields being generated in southern Sweden compared to central Scotland and are further described in the...

Data from: Land-use intensification increases richness of native and exotic herbaceous plants, but not endemics, in Malagasy vanilla landscapes

Estelle Raveloaritiana, Annemarie Wurz, Ingo Grass, Kristina Osen, Marie Rolande Soazafy, Dominic A. Martin, Lucien Faliniaina, Nantenaina H. Rakotomalala, Maria S. Vorontsova, Teja Tscharntke & Bakolimalala Rakouth
Aim: North‐eastern Madagascar is a hotspot of plant diversity, but vanilla and rice farming are driving land‐use change, including slash‐and‐burn management. It still remains unknown how land‐use change and land‐use history affect richness and composition of endemic, native and exotic herbaceous plant species. Location: North‐eastern Madagascar. Methods: We assessed herbaceous plants along a land‐use intensification gradient ranging from unburned land‐use types (i.e. old‐growth forest, forest fragment and forest‐derived vanilla agroforest) to burned land‐use types (i.e....

Post-fire vegetation succession in the Siberian subarctic tundra over 45 years

Ramona Julia Heim, Anna Bucharova, Leya Brodt, Johannes Kamp, Daniel Rieker, Andrey Soromotin, Andrey Yurtaev & Norbert Hölzel
Wildfires are relatively rare in subarctic tundra ecosystems, but they can strongly change ecosystem properties. Short-term fire effects on subarctic tundra vegetation are well documented, but long-term vegetation recovery has been studied less. The frequency of tundra fires will increase with climate warming. Understanding the long-term effects of fire is necessary to predict future ecosystem changes. We used a space-for-time approach to assess vegetation recovery after fire over more than four decades. We studied soil...

Challenging the concept that eumelanin is the polymorphic brown banded pigment in Cepaea nemoralis

Daniel Jackson, Susanne Affenzeller, Klaus Wolkenstein & Holm Frauendorf
The common grove snail Cepaea nemoralis displays a stable pigmentation polymorphism in its shell that has held the attention of scientists for decades. While the details of the molecular mechanisms that generate and maintain this diversity remain elusive, it has long been employed as a model system to address questions related to ecology, population genetics and evolution. In order to contribute to the ongoing efforts to identify the genes that generate this polymorphism we have...

Isotope analyses of amino acids in fungi and fungal feeding Diptera larvae allow differentiating ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi-based food chains

Melanie Mira Pollierer, Stefan Scheu & Alexei V. Tiunov
1- Both ectomycorrhizal (ECM) and saprotrophic fungi are fundamental to carbon and nutrient dynamics in forest ecosystems; however, the relative importance of these different fungal functional groups for higher trophic levels of the soil food web is virtually unknown. 2- To explore differences between fungal functional groups and their importance for higher trophic levels, we analysed isotopic composition of nitrogen and carbon in amino acids (AAs) and bulk tissue of leaf litter, fungi, and fungal-feeding...

Source pools and disharmony of the world’s island floras

Christian König, Patrick Weigelt, Amanda Taylor, Anke Stein, Wayne Dawson, Franz Essl, Jan Pergl, Petr Pysek, Mark Van Kleunen, Marten Winter, Cyrille Chatelain, Jan Wieringa, Pavel Krestov & Holger Kreft
Island disharmony refers to the biased representation of higher taxa on islands compared to their mainland source regions and represents a central concept in island biology. Here, we develop a generalizable framework for approximating these source regions and conduct the first global assessment of island disharmony and its underlying drivers. We compiled vascular plant species lists for 178 oceanic islands and 735 mainland regions. Using mainland data only, we modelled species turnover as a function...

Data from: Decreasing predation rates and shifting predator compositions along a land-use gradient in Madagascar’s vanilla landscapes

Dominik Schwab, Annemarie Wurz, Ingo Grass, Anjaharnony A.N.A. Rakotomalala, Kristina Osen, Marie Rolande Soazafy, Dominic A. Martin & Teja Tscharntke
1. Land-use change is the main driver of deforestation and land degradation resulting in the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in north-eastern Madagascar. Vanilla, the region’s main cash crop, is grown in agroforestry systems and may provide an opportunity for the conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. 2. We used dummy caterpillars to assess predation rates and predator communities along a land-use gradient including unburned old-growth and forest fragments, herbaceous and woody fallows after...

Carbohydrate depletion in roots impedes phosphorus nutrition of forest trees

Simon Clausing, Rodica Pena, Bin Song, Karolin Müller, Paula Mayer-Gruner, Sven Marhan, Martin Grafe, Stefanie Schulz, Jaane Krüger, Friederike Lang, Michael Schloter, Ellen Kandeler & Andrea Polle
The aim of the study was to determine the effect of belowground plant-derived carbohydrates on P uptake, P concentrations and enzymes activities related to P mobilization in roots, ectomycorrhizas and soil and on the abundances of P-related genes in soil bacteria. We report data from a girdling experiment in two temperate beech forest with contrasting soil phosphorus concentrations. We used soil cores and the fractions of the organic layer and mineral topsoil separately one and...

Impact of nitrogen and phosphorus addition on resident soil and root mycobiomes in beech forests

Simon Clausing, Likulunga Emmanuel Likulunga, Dennis Janz, Huanying Feng, Dominik Schneider, Rolf Daniel, Jaane Krüger, Friederike Lang & Andrea Polle
The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of fertilizers on root-associated and soil residing fungi in beech forests. We report data from a fertilization experiment in three temperate beech forest with contrasting soil phosphorus concentrations. We used soil cores and the fractions of the organic layer and mineral topsoil separately of spring and fall 2018. We collected bulk soil and roots. We provide data on soil for pH, mineral elements, ammonium, nitrate,...

Environmental heterogeneity predicts global species richness patterns better than area

Kristy Udy, Matthias Fritsch, Katrin Meyer, Ingo Grass, Sebastian Hanß, Florian Hartig, Thomas Kneib, Hoger Kreft, Collins Kukuna, Guy Pe'er, Hannah Reininghaus, Britta Tietjen, Clara-Sophie Van Waveren, Kerstin Wiegand & Teja Tscharntke
Aim: It is widely accepted that biodiversity can be determined by niche-relate processes and by pure area effects from local to global scales. Their relative importance, however, is still disputed, and empirical tests are still surprisingly scarce at the global scale. We compare the explanatory power of area and environmental heterogeneity as a proxy for niche-related processes as drivers of native mammal species richnessworldwide and with biogeographical regions. Location: Global Time Period: Data was collated...

Breeding system of diploid sexuals within the Ranunculus auricomus complex and its role in a geographical parthenogenesis scenario

Kevin Karbstein, Elisabeth Rahmsdorf, Salvatore Tomasello, Ladislav Hodač & Elvira Hörandl
The larger distribution area of asexuals compared to their sexual relatives in geographical parthenogenesis (GP) scenarios has been widely attributed to the advantages of uniparental reproduction and polyploidy. However, potential disadvantages of sexuals due to their breeding system have received little attention so far. Here, we study the breeding system of five narrowly distributed sexual lineages of Ranunculus notabilis s.l. (R. auricomus complex) and its effects on outcrossing, inbreeding, female fitness, and heterozygosity. We performed...

Water level response in wells to dynamic shaking in confining unconsolidated sediments: a laboratory study

Hongbiao Gu, Shuang-Shuang Lan, Huang Zhang, Mingyuan Wang, Baoming Chi & Martin Sauter
This article focuses on laboratory experiments designed to investigate the influence of dynamic shaking on water level fluctuation in wells of unconsolidated sediments. A large flume filled with natural sandy sediments was subjected to horizontal dynamic loading at different frequencies (0.5-15Hz) and accelerations (0.1g, 0.15g, 0.25g and 0.5g), generated by a shaking table. Thus, the change in characteristics of the water and saturated sediments were investigated, including how water level and hydraulic properties changed over...

Data from: Decomposition of leaf litter mixtures across biomes: The role of litter identity, diversity and soil fauna

Shixing Zhou, Olaf Butenschoen, Sandra Barantal, I. Tanya Handa, Marika Makkonen, Veronique Vos, Rien Aerts, Matty P. Berg, Brendan McKie, Jasper Van Ruijven, Stephan Hättenschwiler & Stefan Scheu
1. At broad spatial scales, the factors regulating litter decomposition remain ambiguous, with the understanding of these factors largely based on studies investigating site-specific single litter species, whereas studies using multi litter species mixtures across sites are rare. 2. We exposed in microcosms containing single species and all possible mixtures of four leaf litter species differing widely in initial chemical and physical characteristics from a temperate forest to the climatic conditions of four different forests...

Validation of the AD dementia conversion-related pattern as an ATN biomarker of neurodegeneration: Supplemental material

Ganna Blazhenets, Lars Frings, Yilong Ma, Arnd Sörensen, David Eidelberg, Jens Wiltfang & Philipp T. Meyer
Objective: To determine whether the Alzheimer’s disease dementia conversion-related pattern (ADCRP) on [18F]FDG PET can serve as a valid predictor for the development of Alzheimer’s disease dementia, the individual expression of the ADCRP (subject score) and its prognostic value were examined in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and biologically defined Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: 269 subjects with available [18F]FDG PET, [18F]AV-45 PET, phosphorylated and total tau in CSF, and neurofilament light chain in plasma were included....

Data from: Environmental heterogeneity dynamics drive plant diversity on oceanic islands

Martha Paola Barajas Barbosa, Patrick Weigelt, Michael Borregaard, Gunnar Keppel & Holger Kreft
Aim: The General Dynamic Model (GDM) links island biogeographical processes to island geological history. A key premise of the GDM implies that environmental factors shaping the ecology and evolution of insular biota follow a hump-shaped trend over the island’s life span and drive dynamics in carrying capacity, species diversity and endemism. An important component of the GDM is environmental heterogeneity (EH), but its effects on insular diversity remain poorly understood. Here, we first quantified EH,...

Data from: RADseq resolves the Hawaiian Island radiation of Myrsine L. (Primulaceae) and provides evidence for hybridization

Marc Appelhans, Claudia Paetzold, Kenneth Wood & Warren Wagner
The Hawaiian radiation of Myrsine (primrose family, Primulaceae) is the only one of the ten most species Hawaiian plant lineages that has never been included in a phylogenetic analysis. Our study is based on a RADseq dataset of nearly all Hawaiian Myrsine species and a Sanger sequencing dataset based on a worldwide sampling of Myrsine and related genera. Myrsine as a whole might be paraphyletic with respect to the monotypic Macaronesian genera Heberdenia and Pleiomeris,...

Functional groups of wild bees respond differently to faba bean (Vicia faba L.) cultivation at landscape scale

Nicole Beyer, Doreen Gabriel, Felix Kirsch, Katharina Schulz-Kesting, Jens Dauber & Catrin Westphal
1. Concerns about insect declines are growing and the provisioning of ecosystem services like pollination may be threatened. To safeguard biodiversity, greening measures were introduced within the reform of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy. One measure commonly applied by farmers is the cultivation of nitrogen fixing crops. Although underlying studies are largely missing, this measure is criticized as providing no significant biodiversity benefit. 2. Using a landscape-scale approach, we selected 30 paired study landscapes (1km...

Data from: Variation and conservation implications of the effectiveness of anti-bear interventions

Igor Khorozyan & Matthias Waltert
Human-bear conflicts triggered by nuisance behaviour in public places and damage to livestock, crops, beehives and trees are among the main threats to bear populations globally. The effectiveness of interventions used to minimize bear-caused damage is insufficiently known and comparative reviews are lacking. We conducted a meta-analysis of 77 cases from 48 publications and used the relative risk of damage to compare the effectiveness of non-invasive interventions, invasive management (translocations) and lethal control (shooting) against...

Agricultural intensification reduces plant taxonomic and functional diversity across European arable systems.

Carlos P Carmona, Irene Guerrero, Begoña Peco, Manuel B. Morales, Juan J Onate, Tomas Pärt, Teja Tscharntke, Jaan Liira, Tsipe Aavik, Mark Emmerson, Frank Berendse, Piotr Ceryngier, Vincent Bretagnolle, Wolfgang Weisser & Jan Bengtsson
1. Agricultural intensification is one of the main drivers of species loss worldwide, but there is still a lack of information about its effect on functional diversity of arable weeds communities. 2. Using a large scale pan European study including 786 fields within 261 farms from eight countries, we analysed differences in the taxonomic and functional diversity of arable weeds assemblages across different levels of agricultural intensification in. We estimated weed species frequency in each...

Identifying drivers of forest resilience in long-term records from the Neotropics

Carole Adolf, Carolina Tovar, Nicola Kühn, Hermann Behling, Juan Carlos Berrío, Gabriela Dominguez-Vázquez, Blanca Figueroa-Rangel, Zaire Gonzalez-Carranza, Gerald Alexander Islebe, Henry Hooghiemstra, Hector Neff, Miguel Olvera-Vargas, Bronwen Whitney, Matthew J. Wooller & Kathy J. Willis
Here we use 30 long-term, high-resolution palaeoecological records from Mexico, Central and South America to address two hypotheses regarding possible drivers of resilience in tropical forests as measured in terms of recovery rates from previous disturbances. First, we hypothesise that faster recovery rates are associated with regions of higher biodiversity, as suggested by the insurance hypothesis. And second, that resilience is due to intrinsic abiotic factors that are location specific, thus regions presently displaying resilience...

Plant intraspecific functional trait variation is related to within-habitat heterogeneity and genetic diversity in Trifolium montanum L.

Kevin Karbstein, Kathleen Prinz, Frank Hellwig & Christine Römermann
Intraspecific trait variation (ITV), based on available genetic diversity, is one of the major means plant populations can respond to environmental variability. The study of functional trait variation and diversity has become popular in ecological research, e.g. as a proxy for plant performance influencing fitness. Up to now, it is unclear which aspects of intraspecific functional trait variation (iFDCV) can be attributed to the environment or genetics under natural conditions. Here, we examined 260 individuals...

Data from: Trophic level and basal resource use of soil animals are hardly affected by local plant associations in abandoned arable land

Jörg-Alfred Salamon, Janet Wissuwa, Stefan Scheu, Anton Potapov & Thomas Frank
Stable isotope composition of plants and soil animals in abandoned arable land Dataset provides raw data on stable isotope composition of C and N of plants and soil meso- and macrofauna. Dominating animal groups were collected in arable fallow systems 3 and 14-16 years after abandonment. Animals were sampled from the rhizosphere of three plant species of different functional groups: a legume (Medicaco sativa), a non-legume herb (Taraxacum officinale) and a grass (Bromus sterilis). More...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    37

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    37

Affiliations

  • University of Göttingen
    37
  • University of Hohenheim
    5
  • University of Freiburg
    4
  • University of Antananarivo
    3
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    2
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2
  • University of Southampton
    2
  • Julius Kühn-Institut
    2
  • German Primate Center
    2
  • University of Copenhagen
    2