15 Works

Data from: Post‐independence mortality of juveniles is driven by anthropogenic hazards for two passerines in an urban landscape

Solny A. Adalsteinsson, Jeffrey J. Buler, Jacob L. Bowman, Vincent D'Amico, Zachary S. Ladin & W. Gregory Shriver
Urban environments impose novel selection pressures with varying impacts across species and life history stages. The post‐fledging stage for migratory passerines, defined as the period of time from when hatch‐year birds fledge until their first migration, is a poorly understood component of annual productivity that potentially limits population growth. We studied two migratory passerines with positive and negative population responses to urbanization, respectively: Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) and Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina). Our goals were...

Data from: Mapping movement, mood, motivation, and mentation in the subthalamic nucleus

Amritha Gourisankar, Sarah A. Eisenstein, Nicholas T. Trapp, Jonathan M. Koller, Meghan C. Campbell, Mwiza Ushe, Joel S. Perlmutter, Tamara Hershey & Kevin J. Black
The anatomical connections of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) have driven hypotheses about its functional anatomy, including the hypothesis that the precise anatomical location of STN deep brain stimulation (DBS) contributes to the variability of motor and non-motor responses across Parkinson disease (PD) patients. We previously tested that hypothesis using a three-dimensional (3D) statistical method to interpret the acute effects of unilateral DBS at each patient’s clinically optimized DBS settings and active contact. Here we report...

Data from: Evidence that metallic proxies are unsuitable for assessing the mechanics of microwear formation and a new theory of the meaning of microwear

Adam Van Casteren, Peter W. Lucas, David S. Strait, Shaji Michael, Nick Bierwisch, Norbert Schwarzer, Khaled Al-Fadhalah, Abdulwahab Almusallam, Lidia Arockia Thai, Sreeja Saji, Ali Shekeban, Michael V. Swain, Khaled J. Al-Fadhalah & Abdulwahab S. Almusallam
Mammalian tooth wear research reveals contrasting patterns seemingly linked to diet: irregularly-pitted enamel surfaces, possibly from consuming hard seeds, vs. roughly-aligned linearly-grooved surfaces, associated with eating tough leaves. These patterns are important for assigning diet to fossils, including hominins. However, experiments establishing conditions necessary for such damage challenge this paradigm. Lucas et al. (2013) slid natural objects against enamel, concluding anything less hard than enamel would rub, not abrade, its surface (producing no immediate wear)....

Data from: Adaptive radiation along a deeply conserved genetic line of least resistance in Anolis lizards

Joel W. McGlothlin, Megan E. Kobiela, Helen V. Wright, D. Luke Mahler, Jason J. Kolbe, Jonathan B. Losos, & Edmund D. Brodie
On microevolutionary timescales, adaptive evolution depends upon both natural selection and the underlying genetic architecture of traits under selection, which may constrain evolutionary outcomes. Whether such genetic constraints shape phenotypic diversity over macroevolutionary timescales is more controversial, however. One key prediction is that genetic constraints should bias the early stages of species divergence along “genetic lines of least resistance” defined by the genetic (co)variance matrix, G. This bias is expected to erode over time as...

Data from: Measuring NDC80 binding reveals the molecular basis of tension-dependent kinetochore-microtubule attachments

Tae Yeon Yoo, Jeong-Mo Choi, William Conway, Che-Hang Yu, Rohit V. Pappu & Daniel J. Needleman
Proper kinetochore-microtubule attachments, mediated by the NDC80 complex, are required for error-free chromosome segregation. Erroneous attachments are corrected by the tension dependence of kinetochore-microtubule interactions. Here, we present a method, based on fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer, to quantitatively measure the fraction of NDC80 complexes bound to microtubules at individual kinetochores in living human cells. We found that NDC80 binding is modulated in a chromosome autonomous fashion over prometaphase and metaphase,...

Data from: The specificity of Burkholderia symbionts in the social amoeba farming symbiosis: prevalence, species, genetic and phenotypic diversity

Tamara S. Haselkorn, Susanne DiSalvo, Jacob W. Miller, Usman Bashir, Debra A. Brock, David C. Queller & Joan E. Strassmann
The establishment of symbioses between eukaryotic hosts and bacterial symbionts in nature is a dynamic process. The formation of such relationships depends on the life history of both partners. Bacterial symbionts of amoebae may have unique evolutionary trajectories to the symbiont lifestyle, because bacteria are typically ingested as prey. To persist after being eaten, bacteria must survive phagocytosis. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, certain strains of Burkholderia bacteria are able to resist amoebal digestion...

Data from: The global geography of human subsistence

Michael C. Gavin, Patrick H. Kavanagh, Hannah J. Haynie, Claire Bowern, Carol R. Ember, Russell D. Gray, Fiona M. Jordan, Kathryn R. Kirby, Geoff Kushnick, Bobbi S. Low, Bruno Vilela & Carlos A. Botero
How humans obtain food has dramatically reshaped ecosystems and altered both the trajectory of human history and the characteristics of human societies. Our species’ subsistence varies widely, from predominantly foraging strategies, to plant-based agriculture and animal husbandry. The extent to which environmental, social, and historical factors have driven such variation is currently unclear. Prior attempts to resolve long-standing debates on this topic have been hampered by an over-reliance on narrative arguments, small and geographically-narrow samples,...

Data from: Hurricane-induced selection on the morphology of an island lizard

Colin M. Donihue, Anthony Herrel, Anne-Claire Fabre, Ambika Kamath, Anthony J. Geneva, Thomas W. Schoener, Jason J. Kolbe & Jonathan B. Losos
Hurricanes are catastrophically destructive. Beyond their toll on human life and livelihoods, hurricanes have massive and often long-lasting effects on ecological systems. Despite many examples of mass mortality events following hurricanes, hurricane-induced natural selection has never been demonstrated. Immediately after we finished a survey of Anolis scriptus, a common, small-bodied lizard found throughout the Turks and Caicos archipelago, our study populations were battered by Hurricanes Irma and Maria. Shortly thereafter, we revisited the populations to...

Data from: Simplified models of the symmetric single-pass parallel-plate counterflow heat exchanger: a tutorial

William Pickard, Barbara Abraham-Shrauner & William F. Pickard
The heat exchanger is important in practical thermal processes, especially those of (i) the molten-salt storage schemes, (ii) compressed air energy storage schemes, and (iii) other load-shifting thermal storage presumed to undergird a Smart Grid. Such devices, although central to the utilization of energy from sustainable (but intermittent) renewable sources, will be unfamiliar to many scientists, who nevertheless need a working knowledge of them. This tutorial paper provides a largely self-contained conceptual introduction for such...

Data from: The ephemerality of secondary forests in southern Costa Rica

J. Leighton Reid, Matthew E. Fagan, James Lucas, Joshua Slaughter & Rakan A. Zahawi
Secondary forests are increasingly recognized for conserving biodiversity and mitigating global climate change, but these and other desired outcomes can only be achieved after decades of regeneration, and secondary forests are frequently recleared before they recover to predisturbance conditions. We used a time series of aerial photographs (1947-2014) to evaluate multidecadal persistence of secondary forests across a 320 sq. km landscape in southern Costa Rica. Secondary forests had relatively short lifespans, with 50% recleared within...

Data from: CHIIMP: an automated high-throughput microsatellite genotyping approach reveals greater allelic diversity in wild chimpanzees

Hannah J. Barbian, Andrew Jesse Connell, Alexa N. Avitto, Ronnie M. Russell, Andrew G. Smith, Madhurima S. Gundlapally, Alexander L. Shazad, Yingying Li, Frederic Bibollet-Ruche, Emily E. Wroblewski, Deus Mjungu, Elizabeth V. Lonsdorf, Fiona A. Stewart, Alexander K. Piel, Anne E. Pusey, Paul M. Sharp & Beatrice H. Hahn
Short tandem repeats (STRs), also known as microsatellites, are commonly used to non-invasively genotype wild-living endangered species, including African apes. Until recently, capillary electrophoresis has been the method of choice to determine the length of polymorphic STR loci. However, this technique is labor intensive, difficult to compare across platforms, and notoriously imprecise. Here we developed a MiSeq-based approach and tested its performance using previously genotyped fecal samples from long-term studied chimpanzees in Gombe National Park,...

Data from: Bio-inspired imager improves sensitivity in near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery

Missael Garcia, Christopher Edmiston, Timothy York, Radoslav Marinov, Suman Mondal, Nan Zhu, Gail P. Sudlow, Walter J. Akers, Julie Margenthaler, Samuel Achilefu, Rongguang Liang, Mohamed A. Zayed, Marta Y. Pepino & Viktor Gruev
Image-guided surgery can enhance cancer treatment by decreasing, and ideally eliminating, positive tumor margins and iatrogenic damage to healthy tissue. Current state-of-the-art near-infrared fluorescence imaging systems are bulky and costly, lack sensitivity under surgical illumination, and lack co-registration accuracy between multimodal images. As a result, an overwhelming majority of physicians still rely on their unaided eyes and palpation as the primary sensing modalities for distinguishing cancerous from healthy tissue. Here we introduce an innovative design,...

Data from: Genetic signatures of microbial altruism and cheating in social amoebas in the wild

Suegene Noh, Katherine S. Geist, Xiangjun Tian, Joan E. Strassmann & David C. Queller
Many microbes engage in social interactions. Some of these have come to play an important role in the study of cooperation and conflict, largely because, unlike most animals, they can be genetically manipulated and experimentally evolved. However, whereas animal social behavior can be observed and assessed in natural environments, microbes usually cannot, so we know little about microbial social adaptations in nature. This has led to some difficult-to-resolve controversies about social adaptation even for well-studied...

Data from: Detecting past and ongoing natural selection among ethnically Tibetan women at high altitude in Nepal

Choongwon Jeong, David B. Witonsky, Buddha Basnyat, Maniraj Neupane, Cynthia M. Beall, Geoff Childs, Sienna R. Craig, John Novembre & Anna Di Rienzo
Adaptive evolution in humans has rarely been characterized for its whole set of components, i.e. selective pressure, adaptive phenotype, beneficial alleles and realized fitness differential. We combined approaches for detecting selective sweeps and polygenic adaptations and for mapping the genetic bases of physiological and fertility phenotypes in approximately 1000 indigenous ethnically Tibetan women from Nepal, adapted to high altitude. We performed genome-wide association analysis and tests for polygenic adaptations which showed evidence of positive selection...

Data from: Predictors of alcohol responsiveness in dystonia

Johanna Junker, Valerie Brandt, Brian D. Berman, Marie Vidailhet, Emmanuel Roze, Anne Weissbach, Cynthia Comella, Irene A. Malaty, Joseph Jankovic, Mark S. LeDoux, Alfredo Berardelli, Richard Barbano, Stephen G. Reich, Joel S. Perlmutter, Hyder A. Jinnah & Norbert Brüggemann
Objective: To determine predictors of alcohol responsiveness in a large cohort of dystonia patients. Methods: 2159 participants with dystonia were prospectively enrolled in the cross-sectional Dystonia Coalition multicenter study. Patients with secondary, combined or confirmed genetic dystonia (total n=164) or unknown alcohol responsiveness (n= 737) were excluded. Patients answered a standardized questionnaire and were clinically examined using a standardized video protocol and the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale. Alcohol responsiveness was determined by patients’ self-report. Results:...

Registration Year

  • 2018
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Washington University in St. Louis
    15
  • University of Rhode Island
    2
  • Baylor College of Medicine
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  • University of Toronto
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  • Harvard University
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  • Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
    2
  • Computing Research Association
    1
  • University of Pennsylvania
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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  • Assistance Publique -Hopitaux De Paris
    1