109 Works

Data from: Viral tagging reveals discrete populations in Synechococcus viral genome sequence space

Li Deng, J. Cesar Ignacio-Espinoza, Ann C. Gregory, Bonnie T. Poulos, Joshua S. Weitz, Philip Hugenholtz & Matthew B. Sullivan
Microbes and their viruses drive myriad processes across ecosystems ranging from oceans and soils to bioreactors and humans. Despite this importance, microbial diversity is only now being mapped at scales relevant to nature, while the viral diversity associated with any particular host remains little researched. Here we quantify host-associated viral diversity using viral-tagged metagenomics, which links viruses to specific host cells for high-throughput screening and sequencing. In a single experiment, we screened 107 Pacific Ocean...

Data from: Poor resource quality lowers transmission potential by changing foraging behaviour

Rachel M. Penczykowski, Brian C. P. Lemanski, Robert Drew Sieg, Spencer R. Hall, Jessica Housley Ochs, Julia Kubanek & Meghan A. Duffy
Resource quality can have conflicting effects on the spread of disease. High quality resources could hinder disease spread by promoting host immune function. Alternatively, high quality food might enhance the spread of disease through other traits of hosts or parasites. Thus, to assess how resource quality shapes epidemics, we need to delineate mechanisms by which food quality affects key epidemiological traits. Here, we disentangle effects of food quality on ‘transmission potential’ – a key component...

Data from: Predator identity influences metacommunity assembly

Nicole K. Johnston, Zhichao Pu & Lin Jiang
1.Predation is among the most important biotic factors influencing natural communities, yet we have a rather rudimentary understanding of its role in modulating metacommunity assembly. 2.We experimentally examined the effects of two different predators (a generalist and a specialist) on metacommunity assembly, using protist microcosm metacommunities that varied in predator identity, dispersal among local communities, and the history of species colonization into local communities. 3.Generalist predation resulted in reduced α diversity and increased β diversity...

Data from: Environmental changes drive the temporal stability of semi-arid natural grasslands through altering species asynchrony

Zhuwen Xu, Haiyan Ren, Mai-He Li, Jasper Van Ruijven, Xingguo Han, Shiqiang Wan, Hui Li, Qiang Yu, Yong Jiang & Lin Jiang
Stability is an important property of ecological systems, many of which are experiencing increasing levels of anthropogenic environmental changes. However, how these environmental changes influence ecosystem stability remains poorly understood. We conducted an 8-year field experiment in a semi-arid natural grassland to explore the effects of two common environmental changes, precipitation and nitrogen enrichment, on the temporal stability of plant above-ground biomass. A split-plot design, with precipitation as the main plot factor and nitrogen as...

Data from: Species ecological similarity modulates the importance of colonization history for adaptive radiation

Jiaqi Tan, Xian Yang & Lin Jiang
Adaptive radiation is an important evolutionary process, through which a single ancestral lineage rapidly gives rise to multiple newly formed lineages that specialize in different niches. In the first-arrival hypothesis, David Lack emphasized the importance of species colonization history for adaptive radiation, suggesting that the earlier arrival of a diversifying species would allow it to radiate to a greater extent. Here, we report on the first rigorous experimental test of this hypothesis, using the rapidly...

Data from: Mechanical evidence that flamingos can support their body on one leg with little active muscular force

Young-Hui Chang & Lena H. Ting
Flamingos (Phoenicopteridae) often stand and sleep on one leg for long periods, but it is unknown how much active muscle contractile force they use for the mechanical demands of standing on one leg: body weight support and maintaining balance. First, we demonstrated that flamingo cadavers could passively support body weight on one leg without any muscle activity while adopting a stable, unchanging, joint posture resembling that seen in live flamingos. By contrast, the cadaveric flamingo...

Dimensional analysis of spring-wing systems reveals performance metrics for resonant flapping-wing flight

Nicholas Gravish, James Lynch, Jeff Gau & Simon Sponberg
Flapping-wing insects, birds, and robots are thought to offset the high power cost of oscillatory wing motion by using elastic elements for energy storage and return. Insects possess highly resilient elastic regions in their flight anatomy that may enable high dynamic efficiency. However, recent experiments highlight losses due to damping in the insect thorax that could reduce the benefit of those elastic elements. We performed experiments on, and simulations of a dynamically-scaled robophysical flapping model...

Microtus californicus toothrow and molar .tps files

Jenny McGuire & Daniel Lauer
Aim. This study examines how climate shaped Microtus californicus (Rodentia: Arvicolinae) ecomorphology throughout the Quaternary. It tests three hypotheses: (1) climate corresponds with consistent shape variation in M. californicus dentition; (2) Quaternary warming and drying trends caused M. californicus morphotypes to predictably shift in range through time; (3) Quaternary warming and drying led to predictable changes in tooth morphological variation. Finally, we discuss how shifts in climate-linked morphological variation may affect the potential of M....

Effects of future climate on coral-coral competition

Nicole Johnston, Mark Hay, Valerie Paul & Justin Campbell
As carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) levels increase, coral reefs and other marine systems will be affected by the joint stressors of ocean acidification (OA) and warming. The effects of these two stressors on coral physiology are relatively well studied, but their impact on biotic interactions between corals are poorly understood. While coral-coral interactions are less common on modern reefs, it is important to document the nature of these interactions to better inform restoration strategies...

Data from: Nanotransfection-based vasculogenic cell reprogramming drives functional recovery in a mouse model of ischemic stroke

Luke Lemmerman, Maria Balch, Jordan Moore, Diego Alzate-Correa, Maria Rincon-Benavides, Ana Salazar-Puerta, Surya Gnyawali, Hallie Harris, William Lawrence, Lilibeth Ortega-Pineda, Lauren Wilch, Ian Risser, Aidan Maxwell, Silvia Duarte-Sanmiguel, Daniel Dodd, Gina Guio-Vega, Dana McTigue, William Arnold, Shahid Nimjee, Chandan Sen, Savita Khanna, Cameron Rink, Natalia Higuita-Castro & Daniel Gallego-Perez
Ischemic stroke causes vascular and neuronal tissue deficiencies that could lead to significant functional impairment and/or death. Although progenitor-based vasculogenic cell therapies have shown promise as a potential rescue strategy following ischemic stroke, current approaches face major hurdles. Here we used fibroblasts nanotransfected with Etv2, Foxc2, and Fli1 (EFF), to drive reprogramming-based vasculogenesis, intracranially, as a potential therapy for ischemic stroke. Perfusion analyses suggest that intracranial delivery of EFF-nanotransfected fibroblasts led to a dose-dependent increase...

Environmental stress gradients regulate the relative importance of predator density- and trait-mediated indirect effects in oyster reef communities

Jessica Pruett & Marc Weissburg
Predators affect community structure by influencing prey density and traits, but the importance of these effects often is difficult to predict. We measured the strength of blue crab predator effects on mud crab prey consumption of juvenile oysters across a flow gradient that inflicts both physical and sensory stress to determine how the relative importance of top predator density-mediated indirect effects (DMIEs) and trait-mediated indirect effects (TMIEs) change within systems. Overall, TMIEs dominated in relatively...

Data from: Virulent disease epidemics can increase host density by depressing foraging of hosts

Rachel Penczykowski, Marta Shocket, Jessica Housley Ochs, Brian Lemanski, Hema Sundar, Meghan Duffy & Spencer Hall
All else equal, parasites that harm host fitness should depress densities of their hosts. However, parasites that alter host traits may increase host density via indirect ecological interactions. Here, we show how depression of foraging rate of infected hosts can produce such a hydra effect. Using a foraging assay, we quantified reduced foraging rates of a zooplankton host infected with a virulent fungal parasite. We then parameterized a dynamical model of hosts, parasites, and resources...

De Novo Design of Peptides that Co-assemble into β-sheet Based Nanofibrils Dataset

Kong M. Wong, Xingqing Xiao, Yiming Wang, Dillon T. Seroski, Renjie Liu, Anant K. Paravastu, Gregory A. Hudalla & Carol K. Hall

Sensitivity analysis of the maximum entropy production method to model evaporation in boreal and temperate forests

Audrey Maheu, Pierre-Erik Isabelle, Laure Viens, Daniel F. Nadeau, François Anctil & Jingfeng Wang
The maximum entropy production (MEP) approach has been little used to simulate evaporation in forests and its sensitivity to input variables has yet to be systematically evaluated. This study addresses these shortcomings. First, we show that the MEP model performed well in simulating evaporation during the snow-free period at six sites in temperate and boreal forests (0.68 ≤ NSE ≤ 0.82). Second, we computed a sensitivity coefficient S representing the proportion of change in the...

Supporting data for: Gene-rich UV sex chromosomes harbor conserved regulators of sexual development (Carey et al., 2021)

Sarah Carey, Shenqiang Shu, John Lovell, Avinash Shenqiang, Florian Maumus, George Tiley, Noe Fernandez-Pozo, Kerrie Barry, Cindy Chen, Mei Wang, Anna Lipzen, Chris Daum, Christopher Saski, Adam Payton, Jordan McBreen, Roth Conrad, Leslie Kollar, Sanna Olsson, Sanna Huttunen, Jacob Landis, Norman Wickett, Matthew Johnson, Stefan Rensing, Jane Grimwood, Jeremy Schmutz … & Adam Healey
Non-recombining sex chromosomes, like the mammalian Y, often lose genes and accumulate transposable elements, a process termed degeneration. The correlation between suppressed recombination and degeneration is clear in animal XY systems, but the absence of recombination is confounded with other asymmetries between the X and Y. In contrast, UV sex chromosomes, like those found in bryophytes, experience symmetrical population genetic conditions. Here we generate and use nearly gapless female and male chromosome-scale reference genomes of...

Machine learning to extract muscle fascicle length changes from dynamic ultrasound images in real-time

Luis Rosa
B-mode ultrasound has become one-off, if not the main way of measuring muscle fascicle fiber lengths non-invasively. Yet, the gold standard for tracking these is still time-intensive hand-tracking, and even with semi-automated approaches, the process takes time and has to be done post hoc. Hence, towards greatly improving current processing capabilities by tracking these muscle fasicle lengths in real-time, we trained and optimized machine learning models with collected B-mode ultrasound data. We focused on soleus...

The evolution of two distinct strategies of moth flight

Brett Aiello
Across insects, wing shape and size have undergone dramatic divergence even in closely related sister groups. However, we do not know how morphology changes in tandem with kinematics to support body weight within available power and how the specific force production patterns are linked to differences in behavior. Hawkmoths and wild silkmoths are diverse sister families with divergent wing morphology. Using 3d kinematics and quasi-steady aerodynamic modeling, we compare the aerodynamics and the contributions of...

Dataset: Procedure to categorize wheelchair cushion performance using compliant buttock models

Stephen Springle & Yogesh Deshpande

Data from: Variation in costs of parasite resistance among natural host populations

Stuart K. J. R. Auld, Rachel M. Penczykowski, Jessica Housley Ochs, Dylan C. Grippi, Spencer R. Hall & Meghan A. Duffy
Organisms that can resist parasitic infection often have lower fitness in the absence of parasites. These costs of resistance can mediate host evolution during parasite epidemics. For example, large epidemics will select for increased host resistance. In contrast, small epidemics (or no disease) can select for increased host susceptibility when costly resistance allows more susceptible hosts to outcompete their resistant counterparts. Despite their importance for evolution in host populations, costs of resistance (which are also...

Data from: Interactive effects of disturbance and dispersal on community assembly

Miriam N. Ojima & Lin Jiang
The traditional debate on alternative community states has been over whether or not they exist. Studies of community assembly have examined the role of assembly history in driving community divergence, but the context in which assembly history becomes important is a continued topic of interest. In this study, we created communities of bacterivorous ciliated protists in laboratory microcosms and manipulated assembly history, disturbance frequency, and the presence of dispersal among local communities to investigate the...

Data from: Manipulating virulence factor availability can have complex consequences for infections

Michael Weigert, Adin Ross-Gillespie, Anne Leinweber, Gabriella Pessi, Sam P. Brown & Rolf Kuemmerli
Given the rise of bacterial resistance against antibiotics, we urgently need alternative strategies to fight infections. Some propose we should disarm rather than kill bacteria, through targeted disruption of their virulence factors. It is assumed that this approach (i) induces weak selection for resistance because it should only minimally impact bacterial fitness, and (ii) is specific, only interfering with the virulence factor in question. Given that pathogenicity emerges from complex interactions between pathogens, hosts, and...

Data from: Geographic differences in vertical connectivity in the Caribbean coral Montastraea cavernosa despite high levels of horizontal connectivity at shallow depths

Xaymara Serrano, Iliana B. Baums, Katherine O'Reilly, Tyler B. Smith, Ross J. Jones, Tonya L. Shearer, Flavia L. D. Nunes & Andrew C. Baker
The Deep Reef Refugia Hypothesis proposes that deep reefs can act as local recruitment sources for shallow reefs following disturbance. To test this hypothesis, nine polymorphic DNA microsatellite loci were developed and used to assess vertical connectivity in 583 coral colonies of the Caribbean depth-generalist coral Montastraea cavernosa. Samples were collected from three depth zones (≤10 m, 15-20 m and ≥25 m) at sites in Florida Upper Keys, Lower Keys and Dry Tortugas), Bermuda, and...

Data from: Rapid evolution of sex frequency and dormancy as hydroperiod adaptations

Hilary A. Smith & Terry W. Snell
Dormancy can serve as an adaptation to persist in variable habitats, and often is coupled with sex. In cyclically parthenogenetic rotifers an asexual phase enables rapid population growth, whereas sex results in diapausing embryos capable of tolerating desiccation. Few studies have experimentally tested whether sex-dormancy associations in temporary waters reflect evolution in response to the short hydroperiod selecting for diapause ability. Here we demonstrate evolution of higher propensity for sex and dormancy in ephemeral rotifer...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    16
  • 2021
    25
  • 2020
    19
  • 2019
    8
  • 2018
    6
  • 2017
    13
  • 2016
    8
  • 2015
    2
  • 2014
    6
  • 2013
    2

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    109

Affiliations

  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    109
  • East China Normal University
    6
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    5
  • Emory University
    5
  • Henan University
    4
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • Indiana University Bloomington
    3
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    3
  • University of Arizona
    3
  • Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research
    3