104 Works

Data from: Phylogenetic context determines the role of competition in adaptive radiation

Jiaqi Tan, Matthew R. Slattery, Xian Yang & Lin Jiang
Understanding ecological mechanisms regulating the evolution of biodiversity is of much interest to ecologists and evolutionary biologists. Adaptive radiation constitutes an important evolutionary process that generates biodiversity. Competition has long been thought to influence adaptive radiation, but the directionality of its effect and associated mechanisms remain ambiguous. Here, we report a rigorous experimental test of the role of competition on adaptive radiation using the rapidly evolving bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 interacting with multiple bacterial species...

Data from: Long-term antagonistic effect of increased precipitation and nitrogen addition on soil respiration in a semiarid steppe

Hongyan Han, Yue Du, Dafeng Hui, Lin Jiang, Mingxing Zhong & Shiqiang Wan
Changes in water and nitrogen (N) availability due to climate change and atmospheric N deposition could have significant effects on soil respiration, a major pathway of carbon (C) loss from terrestrial ecosystems. A manipulative experiment simulating increased precipitation and atmospheric N deposition has been conducted for 9 years (2005–2013) in a semiarid grassland in Mongolian Plateau, China. Increased precipitation and N addition interactively affect soil respiration through the 9 years. The interactions demonstrated that N...

Data from: De novo origins of multicellularity in response to predation

Matthew D. Herron, Joshua M. Borin, Jacob C. Boswell, Jillian Walker, I-Chen Kimberly Chen, Charles A. Knox, Margrethe Boyd, Frank Rosenzweig & William C. Ratcliff
The transition from unicellular to multicellular life was one of a few major events in the history of life that created new opportunities for more complex biological systems to evolve. Predation is hypothesized as one selective pressure that may have driven the evolution of multicellularity. Here we show that de novo origins of simple multicellularity can evolve in response to predation. We subjected outcrossed populations of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to selection by...

Effect of wheels, casters and forks on vibration attenuation and propulsion cost of manual wheelchairs - dataset

Jacob Misch, Yuanning Liu & Stephen Sprigle

Anatomy of a Selectively Coassembled Beta-sheet Peptide Nanofiber Dataset

Kong M. Wong, Qing Shao, Dillon T. Seroski, Yiming Wang, Renjie Liu, Anant K. Paravastu, Gregory A. Hudalla & Carol K. Hall

Large interannual variability in supraglacial lakes around East Antarctica (2014-2020)

Jennifer Arthur, Chris Stokes, Stewart Jamieson, Rachel Carr, Amber Leeson & Vincent Verjans
This dataset provides supraglacial lake extents and depths as included in the paper by Arthur et al. (in review, Nature Comms.) entitled " Large interannual variability in supraglacial lakes around East Antarctica". Please cite this paper if using this data. This dataset consists of (1) shapefiles of supraglacial lake extents around the East Antarctic Ice Sheet derived from Landsat-8 imagery acquired between January 2014 and 2020 and (2) rasters of supraglacial lake depths derived from...

Can You Hear My Heartbeat?: Hearing an Expressive Biosignal Elicits Empathy - Supplementary Data

R. Michael Winters, Grace Leslie & Bruce Walker

Incorporating New Technologies in EEIO Models - Case Study Input Data

Cindy Azuero Pedraza, Valerie Thomas & Wesley Ingwersen

Data from: Repeatability and contingency in the evolution of a key innovation in phage lambda

Justin R. Meyer, Devin T. Dobias, Joshua S. Weitz, Jeffrey E. Barrick, Ryan T. Quick & Richard E. Lenski
The processes responsible for the evolution of key innovations, whereby lineages acquire qualitatively new functions that expand their ecological opportunities, remain poorly understood. We examined how a virus, bacteriophage λ, evolved to infect its host, Escherichia coli, through a novel pathway. Natural selection promoted the fixation of mutations in the virus’s host-recognition protein, J, that improved fitness on the original receptor, LamB, and set the stage for other mutations that allowed infection through a new...

Data from: The multivariate association between genomewide DNA methylation and climate across the range of Arabidopsis thaliana

Thomas E. Keller, Jesse R. Lasky & Soojin V. Yi
Epigenetic changes can occur due to extracellular environmental conditions. Consequently, epigenetic mechanisms can play an intermediate role to translate environmental signals to intracellular changes. Such a role might be particularly important in plants, which often show strong local adaptation and have the potential for heritable epigenetic states. However, little is currently known about the role of epigenetic variation in the ecological mechanisms of adaptation. Here, we used multivariate redundancy analyses to examine genomewide associations between...

Data from: The route of infection determines Wolbachia antibacterial protection in Drosophila

Vanika Gupta, Radhakrishnan B. Vasanthakrishnan, Jonathon Siva-Jothy, Katy M. Monteith, Sam P. Brown & Pedro F. Vale
Bacterial symbionts are widespread among metazoans and provide a range of beneficial functions. Wolbachia-mediated protection against viral infection has been extensively demonstrated in Drosophila. In mosquitoes that are artificially transinfected with Drosophila melanogaster Wolbachia (wMel), protection from both viral and bacterial infections has been demonstrated. However, no evidence for Wolbachia-mediated antibacterial protection has been demonstrated in Drosophila to date. Here, we show that the route of infection is key for Wolbachia-mediated antibacterial protection. Drosophila melanogaster...

Data from: Multi-scale model of CRISPR-induced coevolutionary dynamics: diversification at the interface of Lamarck and Darwin

Lauren Maressa Childs, Nicole L. Held, Mark J. Young, Rachel J. Whitaker & Joshua S. Weitz
The CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) system is a recently discovered type of adaptive immune defense in bacteria and archaea that functions via directed incorporation of viral and plasmid DNA into host genomes. Here, we introduce a multi-scale model of dynamic coevolution between hosts and viruses in an ecological context that incorporates CRISPR immunity principles. We analyze the model to test whether and how CRISPR immunity induces host and viral diversification and the...

Data from: Courting disaster: how diversification rate affects fitness under risk

William C. Ratcliff, Peter Hawthorne & Eric Libby
Life is full of risk. To deal with this uncertainty, many organisms have evolved bet-hedging strategies that spread risk through phenotypic diversification. These rates of diversification can vary by orders of magnitude in different species. Here we examine how key characteristics of risk and organismal ecology affect the fitness consequences of variation in diversification rate. We find that rapid diversification is strongly favored when the risk faced has a wide spatial extent, with a single...

Data from: Genetics of a de novo origin of undifferentiated multicellularity

Matthew D. Herron, William C. Ratcliff, Jacob Boswell & Frank Rosenzweig
The evolution of multicellularity was a major transition in evolution and set the stage for unprecedented increases in complexity, especially in land plants and animals. Here we explore the genetics underlying a de novo origin of multicellularity in a microbial evolution experiment carried out on the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that large-scale changes in gene expression underlie the transition to a multicellular life cycle. Among these, changes to genes involved in cell cycle...

Data from: Resources, key traits, and the size of fungal epidemics in Daphnia populations

David J. Civitello, Rachel M. Penczykowski, Aimee N. Smith, Marta S. Shocket, Meghan A. Duffy & Spencer R. Hall
1. Parasites can profoundly affect host populations and ecological communities. Thus, it remains critical to identify mechanisms that drive variation in epidemics. Resource availability can drive epidemics via traits of hosts and parasites that govern disease spread. 2. Here, we map resource–trait–epidemic connections to explain variation in fungal outbreaks (Metschnikowia bicuspidata) in a zooplankton host (Daphnia dentifera) among lakes. We predicted epidemics would grow larger in lakes with more phytoplankton via three energetic mechanisms. First,...

Data from: Gene duplication and the evolution of phenotypic diversity in insect societies

Linh M. Chau & Michael A. D. Goodisman
Gene duplication is an important evolutionary process thought to facilitate the evolution of phenotypic diversity. We investigated if gene duplication was associated with the evolution of phenotypic differences in a highly social insect, the honeybee Apis mellifera. We hypothesized that the genetic redundancy provided by gene duplication could promote the evolution of social and sexual phenotypes associated with advanced societies. We found a positive correlation between sociality and rate of gene duplications across the Apoidea,...

Data from: Force and torque on spherical particles in micro-channel flows using computational fluid dynamics

Jin Suo, Erin E. Edwards, Ananyaveena Anilkumar, Todd Sulchek, Don P. Giddens & Susan N. Thomas
To delineate the influence of hemodynamic force on cell adhesion processes, model in vitro fluidic assays that mimic physiological conditions are commonly employed. Herein, we offer a framework for solution of the three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to estimate the forces resulting from fluid flow near a plane acting on a sphere that is either stationary or in free flow, and we compare these results to a widely used theoretical model that...

Data from: Niche and fitness differences determine invasion success and impact in laboratory bacterial communities

Shao-Peng Li, Jiaqi Tan, Xian Yang, Chao Ma & Lin Jiang
There is increasing awareness of invasion in microbial communities worldwide, but the mechanisms behind microbial invasions remain poorly understood. Specifically, we know little about how the evolutionary and ecological differences between invaders and natives regulate invasion success and impact. Darwin’s naturalization hypothesis suggests that the phylogenetic distance between invaders and natives could be a useful predictor of invasion, and modern coexistence theory proposes that invader-native niche and fitness differences combine to determine invasion outcome. However,...

Data from: Repeated evolution and reversibility of self-fertilization in the volvocine green algae

Erik R. Hanschen, Matthew D. Herron, John J. Wiens, Hisayoshi Nozaki & Richard E. Michod
Outcrossing and self-fertilization are fundamental strategies of sexual reproduction, each with different evolutionary costs and benefits. Self-fertilization is thought to be an evolutionary “dead-end” strategy, beneficial in the short term but costly in the long term, resulting in self-fertilizing species that occupy only the tips of phylogenetic trees. Here, we use volvocine green algae to investigate the evolution of self-fertilization. We use ancestral-state reconstructions to show that self-fertilization has repeatedly evolved from outcrossing ancestors and...

Data from: Assessing the in situ fertilization status of two marine copepod species, Temora longicornis and Eurytemora herdmani; how common are unfertilized eggs in nature?

Rachel S. Lasley-Rasher, Andrew M. Kramer, Victoria Burdett-Coutts & Jeannette Yen
We utilized an egg staining technique to measure the in situ fertilization success of two marine copepod species, Temora longicornis and Eurytemora herdmani from May to October 2008 in coastal Maine and correlated fertilization success with environmental conditions in their habitat. T. longicornis is a free spawning species that releases eggs into the ambient seawater after mating. In contrast, E. herdmani carries eggs in an egg sac until they hatch. The proportion of fertilized eggs...

Data from: Nanometer-scale structure differences in the myofilament lattice spacing of two cockroach leg muscles correspond to their different functions

Travis Carver Tune, Weikang Ma, Thomas Irving & Simon Sponberg
Muscle is highly organized across multiple length scales. Consequently, small changes in the arrangement of myofilaments can influence macroscopic mechanical function. Two leg muscles of a cockroach, have identical innervation, mass, twitch responses, length-tension curves, and force-velocity relationships. However, during running, one muscle is dissipative (a "brake"), while the other dissipates and produces significant positive mechanical work (bifunctional). Using time resolved x-ray diffraction in intact, contracting muscle, we simultaneously measured the myofilament lattice spacing, packing...

Data from: Avoided heat-related mortality through climate adaptation in three US cities

, Jason Vargo, Peng Liu, Dana Habeeb, Anthony DeLucia, Marcus Trail, Yongtao Hu, Armistead Russell & Brian Stone
Heat-related mortality in US cities is expected to more than double by the mid-to-late 21st century. Rising heat exposure in cities is projected to result from: 1) climate forcings from changing global atmospheric composition; and 2) local land surface characteristics responsible for the urban heat island effect. The extent to which heat management strategies designed to lessen the urban heat island effect could offset future heat-related mortality remains unexplored in the literature. Using coupled global...

Knifefish turning performance during forward swimming

Olivia Hawkins, Victor Ortega-Jimenez & Christopher Sanford
Rapid turning and swimming contribute to ecologically important behaviors in fishes such as predator avoidance, prey capture, mating, and the navigation of complex environments. For riverine species, such as knifefishes, that are commonly challenged by turbulent flows, turning control may be effective for counteracting adverse locomotive perturbations. Most research on fish maneuvering focuses on fish with traditional fin and body morphologies, which primarily use body bending and the pectoral fins during turning. However, it is...

The evolution of virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic wound infection

Jelly Vanderwoude, Derek Fleming, Sheyda Azimi, Urvish Trivedi, Kendra Rumbaugh & Stephen Diggle
Opportunistic pathogens are associated with a number of chronic human infections, yet the evolution of virulence in these organisms during chronic infection remains poorly understood. Here, we tested the evolution of virulence in the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a murine chronic wound model using a two-part serial passage and sepsis experiment, and found that virulence evolved in different directions in each line of evolution. We also assessed P. aeruginosa adaptation to a chronic...

Caught in a bottleneck: Habitat loss for woolly mammoths in central North America and the ice-free corridor during the last deglaciation

Yue Wang, Chris Widga, Russell Graham, Jenny McGuire, Warren Porter, David Wårlind & John Williams
The dataset is to describe the habitat structure and bioenergetic characteristics of woolly mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius) in North America during the last deglaciation between 15 and 10 ka. The habitat structure includes fractional woody cover (FWC) and net primary productivity (NPP) for 20 plant functional types (PFTs). NPP is based on the dynamic vegetation model LPJ-GUESS (LPJG). FWC is based on LPJ-GUESS and fossil pollen records in the Neotoma Paleoecology Database. The bioenergetic characteristics of...

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