4 Works

Data from: Rapid evolution of sex frequency and dormancy as hydroperiod adaptations

Hilary A. Smith & Terry W. Snell
Dormancy can serve as an adaptation to persist in variable habitats, and often is coupled with sex. In cyclically parthenogenetic rotifers an asexual phase enables rapid population growth, whereas sex results in diapausing embryos capable of tolerating desiccation. Few studies have experimentally tested whether sex-dormancy associations in temporary waters reflect evolution in response to the short hydroperiod selecting for diapause ability. Here we demonstrate evolution of higher propensity for sex and dormancy in ephemeral rotifer...

Data from: Fluc­tu­a­tion domains in adap­tive evo­lu­tion

Carl Boettiger, Jonathan Dushoff & Joshua S. Weitz
We derive an expression for the variation between parallel trajectories in phenotypic evolution, extending the well known result that predicts the mean evolutionary path in adaptive dynamics or quantitative genetics. We show how this expression gives rise to the notion of fluctuation domains–parts of the fitness landscape where the rate of evolution is very predictable (due to fluctuation dissipation) and parts where it is highly variable (due to fluctuation enhancement). These fluctuation domains are determined...

Data from: Repeatability and contingency in the evolution of a key innovation in phage lambda

Justin R. Meyer, Devin T. Dobias, Joshua S. Weitz, Jeffrey E. Barrick, Ryan T. Quick & Richard E. Lenski
The processes responsible for the evolution of key innovations, whereby lineages acquire qualitatively new functions that expand their ecological opportunities, remain poorly understood. We examined how a virus, bacteriophage λ, evolved to infect its host, Escherichia coli, through a novel pathway. Natural selection promoted the fixation of mutations in the virus’s host-recognition protein, J, that improved fitness on the original receptor, LamB, and set the stage for other mutations that allowed infection through a new...

Data from: Multi-scale model of CRISPR-induced coevolutionary dynamics: diversification at the interface of Lamarck and Darwin

Lauren Maressa Childs, Nicole L. Held, Mark J. Young, Rachel J. Whitaker & Joshua S. Weitz
The CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) system is a recently discovered type of adaptive immune defense in bacteria and archaea that functions via directed incorporation of viral and plasmid DNA into host genomes. Here, we introduce a multi-scale model of dynamic coevolution between hosts and viruses in an ecological context that incorporates CRISPR immunity principles. We analyze the model to test whether and how CRISPR immunity induces host and viral diversification and the...

Registration Year

  • 2012
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Affiliations

  • Georgia Institute of Technology
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  • University of Notre Dame
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  • University of California System
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  • Washington University in St. Louis
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  • Montana State University
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  • University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
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