170 Works

Data from: Human impacted landscapes facilitate hybridization between a native and an introduced tree

Sean M. Hoban, Tim S. McCleary, Scott E. Schlarbaum, Sandra L. Anagnostakis & Jeanne Romero-Severson
Spatial and temporal dynamics of hybridization, in particular the influence of local environmental conditions, are well studied for sympatric species but less is known for native-introduced systems, especially for long-lived species. We used microsatellite and chloroplast DNA markers to characterize the influence of anthropogenic landscapes on the extent, direction, and spatial distribution of hybridization between a native North American tree Juglans cinerea (butternut) and an introduced tree Juglans ailantifolia (Japanese walnut) for 1363 trees at...

Data from: Combining GWAS and RNA-seq approaches for detection of the causal mutation for hereditary junctional epidermolysis bullosa in sheep

Aroa Suárez-Vega, Beatriz Gutiérrez-Gil, Julio Benavides, Valentín Perez, Gwenola Tosser-Klopp, Christophe Klopp, Stephen J. Keennel & Juan José Arranz
In this study, we demonstrate the use of a genome-wide association mapping together with RNA-seq in a reduced number of samples, as an efficient approach to detect the causal mutation for a Mendelian disease. Junctional epidermolysis bullosa is a recessive genodermatosis that manifests with neonatal mechanical fragility of the skin, blistering confined to the lamina lucida of the basement membrane and severe alteration of the hemidesmosomal junctions. In Spanish Churra sheep, junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB)...

Data from: Interactions among roots, mycorrhizae and free-living microbial communities differentially impact soil carbon processes

Jessica A. M. Moore, Jiang Jiang, Courtney M. Patterson, Gangsheng Wang, Melanie A. Mayes & Aimée T. Classen
Plant roots, their associated microbial community and free-living soil microbes interact to regulate the movement of carbon from the soil to the atmosphere, one of the most important and least understood fluxes of terrestrial carbon. Our inadequate understanding of how plant–microbial interactions alter soil carbon decomposition may lead to poor model predictions of terrestrial carbon feedbacks to the atmosphere. Roots, mycorrhizal fungi and free-living soil microbes can alter soil carbon decomposition through exudation of carbon...

Data from: Early post-metamorphic, Carboniferous blastoid reveals the evolution and development of the digestive system in early echinoderms

Imran A. Rahman, Johnny A. Waters, Colin D. Sumrall & Alberto Astolfo
Inferring the development of the earliest echinoderms is critical to uncovering the evolutionary assembly of the phylum-level body plan but has long proven problematic because early ontogenetic stages are rarely preserved as fossils. Here, we use synchrotron tomography to describe a new early post-metamorphic blastoid echinoderm from the Carboniferous (approx. 323 Ma) of China. The resulting three-dimensional reconstruction reveals a U-shaped tubular structure in the fossil interior, which is interpreted as the digestive tract. Comparisons...

Data from: Genome-wide selection components analysis in a fish with male pregnancy

Sarah P. Flanagan & Adam G. Jones
A major goal of evolutionary biology is to identify the genome-level targets of natural and sexual selection. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, whole-genome selection components analysis provides a promising avenue in the search for loci affected by selection in nature. Here, we implement a genome-wide selection components analysis in the sex-role-reversed Gulf pipefish, Syngnathus scovelli. Our approach involves a double-digest restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD-seq) technique, applied to adult females, non-pregnant males, pregnant males...

Data from: Hydrospire morphology and implications for blastoid phylogeny

Jennifer E. Bauer, Colin D. Sumrall & Johnny A. Waters
The external expression of hydrospires in blastoids has provided a basis for major and minor group classification in the clade for over a century. Unfortunately, the complete anatomy of the hydrospires has never been comprehensively studied. This study examined and described the internal hydrospires of six spiraculate species by digitally extracting hydrospire data from a legacy data set of serial acetate peels. Although only six models have been currently generated, hydrospire morphology is variable both...

Academic Libraries and Research Data Services dataset

Carol Tenopir, Ben Birch & Suzie Allard
This is the data set for the Academic Libraries and Research Data Services study.

Data from: Global biogeography of mating system variation in seed plants

David A. Moeller, Ryan D. Briscoe Runquist, Annika M. Moe, Monica A. Geber, Carol Goodwillie, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou, Christopher G. Eckert, Elizabeth Elle, Mark O. Johnston, Susan Kalisz, Richard H. Ree, Risa D. Sargent, Mario Vallejo-Marin & Alice A. Winn
Latitudinal gradients in biotic interactions have been suggested as causes of global patterns of biodiversity and phenotypic variation. Plant biologists have long speculated that outcrossing mating systems are more common at low than high latitudes owing to a greater predictability of plant–pollinator interactions in the tropics; however, these ideas have not previously been tested. Here, we present the first global biogeographic analysis of plant mating systems based on 624 published studies from 492 taxa. We...

Data from: Comparative evaluation of potential indicators and temporal sampling protocols for monitoring genetic erosion

Sean Hoban, Jan A. Arntzen, Michael W. Bruford, José A. Godoy, A. Rus Hoelzel, Gernot Segelbacher, Carles Vilà & Giorgio Bertorelle
Genetic biodiversity contributes to individual fitness, species' evolutionary potential, and ecosystem stability. Temporal monitoring of the genetic status and trends of wild populations' genetic diversity can provide vital data to inform policy decisions and management actions. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding which genetic metrics, temporal sampling protocols, and genetic markers are sufficiently sensitive and robust, on conservation-relevant timescales. Here, we tested six genetic metrics and various sampling protocols (number and arrangement of...

Data from: Greater host breadth still not associated with increased diversification rate in the Nymphalidae – a response to Janz et al

Christopher Alan Hamm & James Andrew Fordyce
In their technical comment, Janz et al. take issue with our recent study examining the association between host breadth and diversification rates in the brush footed butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) (Hamm and Fordyce 2015). Specifically, they are concerned that we misrepresent their “oscillation hypothesis” (OH) (Janz et al. 2016; Janz and Nylin 2008) and that one of our models was inadequate to test hypotheses regarding host breadth and diversification rate. Given our mutual interests in the...

Data from: Sequence data for Clostridium autoethanogenum using three generations of sequencing technologies

Sagar M. Utturkar, Dawn M. Klingeman, José M. Bruno-Barcena, Mari S. Chinn, Amy M. Grunden, Michael Köpke & Steven D. Brown
During the past decade, DNA sequencing output has been mostly dominated by the second generation sequencing platforms which are characterized by low cost, high throughput and shorter read lengths for example, Illumina. The emergence and development of so called third generation sequencing platforms such as PacBio has permitted exceptionally long reads (over 20 kb) to be generated. Due to read length increases, algorithm improvements and hybrid assembly approaches, the concept of one chromosome, one contig...

Data from: The ecological importance of intraspecific variation

Simone Des Roches, David M. Post, Nash E. Turley, Joseph K. Bailey, Andrew P. Hendry, Michael T. Kinnison, Jennifer A. Schweitzer & Eric P. Palkovacs
Human activity is causing wild populations to experience rapid trait change and local extirpation. The resulting effects on intraspecific variation could have substantial consequences for ecological processes and ecosystem services. Although researchers have long acknowledged that variation among species influences the surrounding environment, only recently has evidence accumulated for the ecological importance of variation within species. We conducted a meta-analysis comparing the ecological effects of variation within a species (intraspecific effects) with the effects of...

Data from: Plant-soil feedbacks mediate shrub expansion in declining forests, but only in the right light

Alix A. Pfennigwerth, Michael E. Van Nuland, Joseph K. Bailey & Jennifer A. Schweitzer
1. Contemporary global change, including the widespread mortality of foundation tree species, is altering ecosystems and plant communities at unprecedented rates. Plant-soil interactions drive myriad community dynamics, and we hypothesized such interactions may be an important driver of succession following the loss of foundation tree species. 2. We examined whether plant-soil biota interactions, in the context of a putatively important light gradient associated with foundation tree decline, mediate the expansion of Rhododendron maximum in southeastern...

Data from: Divergent plant–soil feedbacks could alter future elevation ranges and ecosystem dynamics

Michael E. Van Nuland, Joseph K. Bailey & Jennifer A. Schweitzer
Plant–soil feedbacks (PSF) are important interactions that may influence range dynamics in a changing world. What remains largely unknown is the generality of plant–soil biotic interactions across populations and the potential role of specific soil biota, both of which are key for understanding how PSF might change future communities and ecosystems. We combined landscape-level field observations and experimental soil treatments to test whether a dominant tree alters soil environments to impact its own performance and...

Data from: Can we build it? Yes we can, but should we use it? Assessing the quality and value of a very large phylogeny of campanulid angiosperms

Jeremy M. Beaulieu & Brian C. O'Meara
The study of very large and very old clades holds the promise of greater insights into evolution across the tree of life. However, there has been a fair amount of criticism regarding the interpretations and quality of studies to date, with some suggesting that detailed studies carried out on smaller, tractable scales should be preferred over the increasingly grand syntheses of these data. Methods - We provided in detail our trials and tribulations of compiling...

Data from: Spatial analysis of anthropogenic landscape disturbance and Buruli ulcer disease in Benin

Lindsay P. Campbell, Andrew O. Finley, Mark Eric Benbow, Jenni Gronseth, Pamela Small, Roch Christian Johnson, Ghislain E. Sopoh, Richard M. Merritt, Heather Williamson & Jiaguo Qi
Background: Land use and land cover (LULC) change is one anthropogenic disturbance linked to infectious disease emergence. Current research has focused largely on wildlife and vector-borne zoonotic diseases, neglecting to investigate landscape disturbance and environmental bacterial infections. One example is Buruli ulcer (BU) disease, a necrotizing skin disease caused by the environmental pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU). Empirical and anecdotal observations have linked BU incidence to landscape disturbance, but potential relationships have not been quantified as...

Extreme developmental instability is associated with the pea aphid wing plasticity

Rachel Hammelman, Carrie Heusinkveld, Emily Hung, Alydia Meinecke, Benjamin Parker & Jennifer Brisson
A key focus of evolutionary developmental biology is on how phenotypic diversity is generated. In particular, both plasticity and developmental instability can contribute to phenotypic variation among genetically identical individuals, but the interactions between the two phenomena and their general fitness impacts are unclear. We discovered a striking example of asymmetry in pea aphids: the presence of wings on one side and the complete or partial absence of wings on the opposite side. We used...

Pathogenic Leptospira isolated from rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana USA, and associated site information

Anna Peterson, Michael Blum, Bruno Ghersi, Claudia Riegel, Elsio Wunder & James Childs
Land use change can elevate disease risk by creating conditions beneficial to species that carry zoonotic pathogens. Observations of concordant global trends in pathogen prevalence and disease incidence have engendered concerns that urbanization could increase transmission risk of some pathogens. Yet host-pathogen relationships underlying transmission risk have not been well characterized within cities, even where contact between humans and species capable of transmitting pathogens of concern occur. We addressed this deficit by testing the hypothesis...

Data from: Inbreeding shapes the evolution of marine invertebrates

Kevin Olsen, Will Ryan, Alice Winn, Ellen Kosman, Jose Moscoso, Stacy Krueger-Hadfield, Scott Burgess, David Carlon, Richard Grosberg, Susan Kalisz & Don Levitan
Inbreeding is a potent evolutionary force shaping the distribution of genetic variation within and among populations of plants and animals. Yet, our understanding of the forces shaping the expression and evolution of non-random mating in general, and inbreeding in particular, remains remarkably incomplete. Most research on plant mating systems focuses on self-fertilization and its consequences for automatic selection, inbreeding depression, purging, and reproductive assurance, whereas studies of animal mating systems have often assumed that inbreeding...

Data from: Pervasive cropland in protected areas highlight trade-offs between conservation and food security

Varsha Vijay & Paul Armsworth
Global cropland expansion over the last century caused widespread habitat loss and degradation. Establishment of protected areas aims to counteract the loss of habitats and to slow species extinctions. However, many protected areas also include high levels of habitat disturbance and conversion for uses such as cropland. Understanding where and why this occurs may realign conservation priorities and inform protected area policy in light of competing priorities such as food security. Here we use a...

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