6 Works

Data from: Two-phase increase in the maximum size of life over 3.5 billion years reflects biological innovation and environmental opportunity

Jonathan L. Payne, Alison G. Boyer, James H. Brown, Seth Finnegan, Michal Kowaleski, , S. Kathleen Lyons, Craig R. McClain, Daniel W. McShea, Phillip M. Novack-Gottshall, Felisa A. Smith, Jennifer A. Stempien, Steve C. Wang, M. Kowalewski & R. A. Krause
NOTE: See also http://bodysize.nescent.org. ABSTRACT: The maximum size of organisms has increased enormously since the initial appearance of life >3.5 billion years ago (Gya), but the pattern and timing of this size increase is poorly known. Consequently, controls underlying the size spectrum of the global biota have been difficult to evaluate. Our period-level compilation of the largest known fossil organisms demonstrates that maximum size increased by 16 orders of magnitude since life first appeared in...

Data from: The adaptive value of gluttony: predators mediate the life history trade-offs of satiation threshold

Jonathan N Pruitt & Jennifer J Krauel
Animals vary greatly in their tendency to consume large meals. Yet, whether or how meal size influences fitness in wild populations is infrequently considered. Using a predator exclusion, marked-recapture experiment, we estimated selection on the amount of food accepted during an ad libitum feeding bout (hereafter termed "satiation threshold") in the wolf spider Schizocosa ocreata. Individually marked, size-matched females of known satiation threshold were assigned to predator exclusion and predator inclusions treatments and tracked for...

Data from: Do constructional constraints influence cyprinid (Cyprinidae: Leuciscinae) craniofacial coevolution?

C Darrin Hulsey & Phillip R Hollingsworth
Constraints on form may determine how organisms diversify. As a result of competition for the limited space within the body, investment in adjacent structures could represent an evolutionary compromise. For example, evolutionary trade-offs resulting from limited space in the head could have influenced how the sizes of the jaw muscle, as well as the eyes, evolved in North American cyprinid fishes. To test the evolutionary independence of the size of these structures, we measured the...

Data from: The adaptive value of gluttony: predators mediate the life history trade-offs of satiation threshold

Jonathan N Pruitt & Jennifer J Krauel
Animals vary greatly in their tendency to consume large meals. Yet, whether or how meal size influences fitness in wild populations is infrequently considered. Using a predator exclusion, marked-recapture experiment, we estimated selection on the amount of food accepted during an ad libitum feeding bout (hereafter termed "satiation threshold") in the wolf spider Schizocosa ocreata. Individually marked, size-matched females of known satiation threshold were assigned to predator exclusion and predator inclusions treatments and tracked for...

Data from: Do constructional constraints influence cyprinid (Cyprinidae: Leuciscinae) craniofacial coevolution?

C Darrin Hulsey & Phillip R Hollingsworth
Constraints on form may determine how organisms diversify. As a result of competition for the limited space within the body, investment in adjacent structures could represent an evolutionary compromise. For example, evolutionary trade-offs resulting from limited space in the head could have influenced how the sizes of the jaw muscle, as well as the eyes, evolved in North American cyprinid fishes. To test the evolutionary independence of the size of these structures, we measured the...

Data from: Two-phase increase in the maximum size of life over 3.5 billion years reflects biological innovation and environmental opportunity

Jonathan L. Payne, Alison G. Boyer, James H. Brown, Seth Finnegan, Michal Kowaleski, , S. Kathleen Lyons, Craig R. McClain, Daniel W. McShea, Phillip M. Novack-Gottshall, Felisa A. Smith, Jennifer A. Stempien, Steve C. Wang, D. W. McShea, M. Kowalewski, J. L. Payne, R. A. Krause, S. C. Wang, P. M. Novack-Gottshall, A. G. Boyer, J. H. Brown & F. A. Smith
NOTE: See also http://bodysize.nescent.org. ABSTRACT: The maximum size of organisms has increased enormously since the initial appearance of life >3.5 billion years ago (Gya), but the pattern and timing of this size increase is poorly known. Consequently, controls underlying the size spectrum of the global biota have been difficult to evaluate. Our period-level compilation of the largest known fossil organisms demonstrates that maximum size increased by 16 orders of magnitude since life first appeared in...

Registration Year

  • 2010
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    6
  • Stanford University
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • Swarthmore College
    2
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • Benedictine University
    2
  • University of New Mexico
    2
  • Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    1