142 Works

Supplementary data for: Mosquito phytophagy – sources exploited, ecological function, and evolutionary transition to haematophagy

Daniel Peach & Gerhard Gries
This dataset consists of two files: Floral visitation records of mosquitoes Plant sugar, primarily in the form of floral nectar, is the ubiquitous basic food of adult mosquitoes. However, records of mosquito floral visitation are not usually the focus of research publications and, as such, are often reported as secondary parts of larger studies and are scattered throughout more than a century of scientific literature. Here we provide a summary of more than 500 recorded...

Custom MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometric Database for identification of environmental Burkholderia and related genera

Roger Linington
Success of microbial natural products discovery programs is dependent on quick and concise discrimination between isolates from diverse environments. However, laboratory isolation and identification of priority genera using current 16S rRNA PCR-based methods is both challenging and time-consuming. In clinical settings, MALDI-TOF MS is used to rapidly identify unknown bacterial pathogens, yet this has not been widely adapted for isolation of environmental bacteria. To expedite isolation of Gram-negative proteobacterial order Burkholderiales, we have created a...

Predicting the effects of reservoir water level management on the reproductive output of a riparian songbird

David Green
Yellow warblers were monitored in Revelstoke, British Columbia, Canada for 12 breeding seasons spanning 2005 to 2017. Data on the breeding biology of individually marked warblers was used to construct an individual-based model describing the effects of reservoir operations on the reproductive output of yellow warblers. This model was parameterised using data on the breeding biology of approximately 30 breeding pairs per year that a provided data on nest sites (ground elevation and nest height),...

Data from: Watershed classification predicts streamflow regime and organic carbon dynamics in the Northeast Pacific Coastal Temperate Rainforest

Ian Giesbrecht, Suzanne Tank, Gordon Frazer, Eran Hood, Santiago Gonzalez Arriola, David Butman, Dave D'Amore, David Hutchinson, Allison Bidlack & Ken Lertzman
Watershed classification has long been a key tool in the hydrological sciences, but few studies have been extended to biogeochemistry. We developed a combined hydro-biogeochemical classification for watersheds draining to the coastal margin of the Northeast Pacific coastal temperate rainforest (1,443,062 km2), including 2,695 small coastal rivers (SCR) and 10 large continental watersheds. We used cluster analysis to group SCR watersheds into 12 types, based on watershed properties. The most important variables for distinguishing SCR...

Climate and conspecific density inform phenotypic forecasting of juvenile Pacific salmon body size

Marta Ulaski, Heather Finkle, Anne Beaudreau & Peter Westley
1. Predicting effects of climate on fitness-linked phenotypic traits, such as body size, is important for the management and conservation of species in the face of global change. During sensitive life stages, small changes in mean trait values can have large effects on survival and population productivity. 2. The transition from freshwater to saltwater by migrating anadromous fishes such as Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) is a critical life history transition, where survival is mediated by...

A deglacial hazard cascade exemplified by the landslide, tsunami and outburst flood at Elliot Creek, Southern Coast Mountains, British Columbia, Canada

Marten Geertsema, Brian Menounos, Gemma Bullard, Jonathan Carrivick, John Clague, Chunli Dai, Davide Donati, Goran Ekstrom, Jennifer Jackson, Patrick Lynett, Manuele Pichierri, Andy Pon, Dan Shugar, Doug Stead, Justin Del Bel Belluz, Pierre Friele, Ian Giesbrecht, Derek Heathfield, Tom Millard, Sasha Nasonova, Andrew Schaeffer, Brent Ward, Darren Blaney, Erik Blaney, Camille Brillon … & Meghan Sharp
We describe and model the evolution of a recent landslide and outburst flood in the southern Coast Mountains, British Columbia, Canada. About 18 Mm3 of rock descended 1000 m from a steep valley wall and traveled across the toe of a glacier before entering a 0.6 km2 glacier lake and producing a >100-m high wave. Water overtopped the lake outlet and scoured a 10-km long channel before depositing debris on a 2 km2 fan below...

Marbled Murrelets prefer stratified waters close to freshwater inputs in Haida Gwaii, BC, Canada

Sonya Pastran, Mark Drever & David Lank
The Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) is a small seabird that is currently listed as threatened in Canada. Understanding this species’ marine habitat preferences plays a vital role in our ability to focus conservation planning. We used the longest-running at-sea survey dataset available in British Columbia to examine hotspot persistence and habitat use at Laskeek Bay, Haida Gwaii, BC. The Laskeek Bay Conservation Society has been conducting spring and summer surveys along fixed transect routes in...

λ/4 Retarder Film Measurement from: Polarization of foliar reflectance – novel host plant cue for insect herbivores

Adam Blake, Matthew Go, Gina Hahn, Hayley Grey, Samuel Couture & Gerhard Gries
Insect herbivores exploit plant cues to discern host and non-host plants. Studies of visual plant cues have focused on color despite the inherent polarization sensitivity of insect photoreceptors and the information carried by polarization of foliar reflectance, most notably the degree of linear polarization (DoLP; 0-100%). The DoLP of foliar reflection was hypothesized to be a host plant cue for insects but was never experimentally tested. Here we show that cabbage white butterflies, Pieris rapae...

Hakai Institute Juvenile Salmon Program

Brett Johnson, Julian Gan, Sean Godwin, Krystal Bachen, Tim van der Stap & Brian Hunt
Fall 2017 Version 1.0 Background: The Hakai Institute Juvenile Salmon Program was launched in the spring of 2015 in a collaborative partnership with UBC, SFU, Salmon Coast, Pacific Salmon Foundation, and DFO. The program operates in the Discovery Islands and Johnstone Strait (Figure 1) and thus provides information on the health of juvenile Fraser River salmon after passage through: 1) Strait of Georgia – stratified high plankton biomass zone; and 2) Discovery Islands & Johnstone...

Data from: Early bursts of body size and shape evolution are rare in comparative data

Luke J. Harmon, Jonathan B. Losos, T. Jonathan Davies, Rosemary G. Gillespie, John L. Gittleman, W. Bryan Jennings, Kenneth H. Kozak, Mark A. McPeek, Franck Moreno-Roark, Thomas J. Near, Andy Purvis, Robert E. Ricklefs, Dolph Schluter, , Ole Seehausen, Brian L. Sidlauskas, Omar Torres-Carvajal, Jason T. Weir & Arne Ø. Mooers
George Gaylord Simpson famously postulated that much of life's diversity originated as adaptive radiations—more or less simultaneous divergences of numerous lines from a single ancestral adaptive type. However, identifying adaptive radiations has proven difficult due to a lack of broad-scale comparative datasets. Here, we use phylogenetic comparative data on body size and shape in a diversity of animal clades to test a key model of adaptive radiation, in which initially rapid morphological evolution is followed...

Data from: Stick insect genomes reveal natural selection's role in parallel speciation

Victor Soria-Carrasco, Zachariah Gompert, Aaron A. Comeault, Timothy E. Farkas, Thomas L. Parchman, J. Spencer Johnston, C. Alex Buerkle, Jeffrey L. Feder, Jens Bast, Tanja Schwander, Scott P. Egan, Bernard J. Crespi & Patrik Nosil
Natural selection can drive the repeated evolution of reproductive isolation, but the genomic basis of parallel speciation remains poorly understood. We analyzed whole-genome divergence between replicate pairs of stick insect populations that are adapted to different host plants and undergoing parallel speciation. We found thousands of modest-sized genomic regions of accentuated divergence between populations, most of which are unique to individual population pairs. We also detected parallel genomic divergence across population pairs involving an excess...

Data from: Potential effects of an invasive bivalve, Nuttallia obscurata, on select sediment attributes within the intertidal region of coastal British Columbia

Kayi Chan & L.I. Bendell
On the west coast of British Columbia, Canada, the varnish clam, Nuttallia obscurata, is a rapidly spreading invasive species that can reach high densities (i.e. 800 individuals m− 2). A field survey (Tier I) and an in situ mesocosm density manipulation experiment (Tier II) were applied to determine the potential effects of this invasive bivalve on select sediment attributes within the intertidal zone. In situ experiments involved seeding 1 m2 mesocosms with varnish clams at...

Data from: Mid-winter temperatures, not spring temperatures, predict breeding phenology in the European starling Sturnus vulgaris

Tony D. Williams, Sophie Bourgeon, Allison Cornell, Laramie Ferguson, Melinda Fowler, Raime B. Fronstin & Oliver P. Love
In many species, empirical data suggest that temperatures less than 1 month before breeding strongly influence laying date, consistent with predictions that short lag times between cue and response are more reliable, decreasing the chance of mismatch with prey. Here we show in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) that mid-winter temperature ca 50–90 days before laying (8 January–22 February) strongly (r2 = 0.89) predicts annual variation in laying date. Mid-winter temperature also correlated highly with relative...

Data from: Unpredictable perturbation reduces breeding propensity regardless of pre-laying reproductive readiness in a partial capital breeder

Pierre Legagneux, Holly L. Hennin, H. Grant Gilchrist, Tony D. Williams, Oliver P. Love & Joël Bêty
Theoretically, individuals of migratory species should optimize reproductive investment based on a combination of timing of and body condition at arrival on the breeding grounds. A minimum threshold body mass is required to initiate reproduction, and the timing of reaching this threshold is critical because of the trade-off between delaying breeding to gain in condition against the declining value of offspring with later reproductive timing. Long-lived species have the flexibility within their life history to...

Data from: Species and population diversity in Pacific salmon fisheries underpin indigenous food security

Holly K. Nesbitt & Jonathan W. Moore
Indigenous people are considered to be among the most vulnerable to food insecurity and biodiversity loss. Biodiversity is cited as a key component of indigenous food security; however, quantitative examples of this linkage are limited. We examined how species and population diversity influence the food security of indigenous fisheries for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus species). We compared two dimensions of food security – catch stability (interannual variability) and access (season length) – across a salmon diversity...

Data from: Bayesian analysis of a morphological supermatrix sheds light on controversial fossil hominin relationships

Mana Dembo, Nicholas J. Matzke, Arne Ø. Mooers & Mark Collard
The phylogenetic relationships of several hominin species remain controversial. Two methodological issues contribute to the uncertainty—use of partial, inconsistent datasets and reliance on phylogenetic methods that are ill-suited to testing competing hypotheses. Here, we report a study designed to overcome these issues. We first compiled a supermatrix of craniodental characters for all widely accepted hominin species. We then took advantage of recently developed Bayesian methods for building trees of serially sampled tips to test among...

Data from: State dependence, personality, and plants: light-foraging decisions in Mimosa pudica (L.)

Franz W. Simon, Christina N. Hodson & Bernard R. Roitberg
Plants make foraging decisions that are dependent on ecological conditions, such as resource availability and distribution. Despite the field of plant behavioral ecology gaining momentum, ecologists still know little about what factors impact plant behavior, especially light-foraging behavior. We made use of the behavioral reaction norm approach to investigate light foraging in a plant species that exhibits rapid movement: Mimosa pudica. We explored how herbivore avoidance behavior in M. pudica (which closes its leaflets temporarily...

Data from: Transitions between phases of genomic differentiation during stick-insect speciation

Rüdiger Riesch, Moritz Muschick, Dorothea Lindtke, Romain Villoutreix, Aaron A. Comeault, Timothy E. Farkas, Kay Lucek, Elizabeth Hellen, Víctor Soria-Carrasco, Stuart R. Dennis, Clarissa F. De Carvalho, Rebecca J. Safran, Cristina P. Sandoval, Jeff Feder, Regine Gries, Bernard J. Crespi, Gerhard Gries, Zach Gompert & Patrik Nosil
Speciation can involve a transition from a few genetic loci that are resistant to gene flow to genome-wide differentiation. However, only limited data exist concerning this transition and the factors promoting it. Here, we study phases of speciation using data from >100 populations of 11 species of Timema stick insects. Consistent with early phases of genic speciation, adaptive colour-pattern loci reside in localized genetic regions of accentuated differentiation between populations experiencing gene flow. Transitions to...

Data from: A genetic locus for paranoia

Bernard Crespi, Silven Read, Iiro Salminen & Peter Hurd
The psychological effects of brain-expressed imprinted genes in humans are virtually unknown. Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurogenetic condition mediated by genomic imprinting, which involves high rates of psychosis characterized by hallucinations and paranoia, as well as autism. Altered expression of two brain-expressed imprinted genes, MAGEL2 and NDN, mediates a suite of PWS-related phenotypes, including behavior, from studies of mice. We phenotyped a large population of typical individuals for schizophrenia-spectrum and autism-spectrum traits, and genotyped...

Data from: Individual dispersal decisions in a cooperative breeder: ecological constraints, the benefits of philopatry, and the social queue for dominance

Martha J. Nelson-Flower, Elizabeth M. Wiley, Thomas P. Flower, Amanda R. Ridley & Tom P. Flower
1. Delayed dispersal is a key step in the evolution of familial animal societies and cooperative breeding. However, no consensus has been reached on the ecological and social circumstances driving delayed dispersal. 2. Here we test predictions from the ecological constraints and benefits of philopatry hypotheses as well as the recently-proposed dual benefits hypothesis to better understand the evolution of group-living and cooperative breeding. Furthermore, we consider how individual social circumstances within groups affect dispersal...

Data from: Conserving evolutionary history does not result in greater diversity over geological timescales

Juan Cantalapiedra, Tracy Aze, Marc Cadotte, Giulio Valentino Dalla Riva, Danwei Huang, Florent Mazel, Matthew Pennell, María Ríos & Arne Mooers
Alternative prioritization strategies have been proposed to safeguard biodiversity over macro-evolutionary timescales. The first prioritizes the most distantly related species (maximizing phylogenetic diversity) in the hopes of capturing at least some lineages that will successfully diversify into the future. The second prioritizes lineages that are currently speciating, in the hopes that successful lineages will continue to generate species into the future. These contrasting schemes also map onto contrasting predictions about the role of slow diversifiers...

Data from: Salmonid species diversity predicts salmon consumption by terrestrial wildlife

Christina N. Service, Andrew W. Bateman, Megan S. Adams, Kyle A. Artelle, Thomas E. Reimchen, Paul C. Paquet & Chris T. Darimont
1. Resource waves - spatial variation in resource phenology that extends feeding opportunities for mobile consumers - can affect the behaviour and productivity of recipient populations. Interspecific diversity among Pacific salmon species (Oncorhynchus spp.) creates staggered spawning events across space and time, thereby prolonging availability to terrestrial wildlife. 2. We aim to understand how such variation might influence consumption by terrestrial predators compared with resource abundance and intra- and inter- specific competition. 3. Using stable...

Data from: Sex and occupation time influence niche space of a recovering keystone predator

Erin U. Rechsteiner, Jane C. Watson, M. Tim Tinker, Linda M. Nichol, Matthew J. Morgan Henderson, Christie J. McMIllan, Mike DeRoos, Marie C. Fournier, Anne K. Salomon, Leah D. Honka & Chris T. Darimont
Predators exert strong effects on ecological communities, particularly when they re-occupy areas after decades of extirpation. Within species, such effects can vary over time and by sex, and cascade across trophic levels. We used a space-for-time substitution to make foraging observations of sea otters (Enhydra lutris) across a gradient of re-occupation (1–30 yrs), and nMDS analysis to ask if 1) sea otter niche space varies as a function of occupation time, and 2) if niche...

Data from: Physiological predictors of reproductive performance in the European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)

Melinda A. Fowler, Mélissa Paquet, Véronique Legault, Alan A. Cohen & Tony D. Williams
Background: It is widely assumed that variation in fitness components has a physiological basis that might underlie selection on trade-offs, but the mechanisms driving decreased survival and future fecundity remain elusive. Here, we assessed whether physiological variables are related to workload ability or immediate fitness consequences and if they mediate future survival or reproductive success. We used data on 13 physiological variables measured in 93 female European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) at two breeding stages (incubation,...

Habitats and fish communities at mesophotic depths in the Mexican Pacific

Jordan A. Hollarsmith, Georgina Ramirez-Ortiz, Tallulah Winquist, Manuel Velasco-Lozano, Katherine DuBois, Hector Bonilla, Kyle Neumann & Ted Grosholz
Aim: Mesophotic ecosystems, found at the limit of light penetration in the ocean, are rich in biodiversity and harbor unique ecological communities. However, they remain among the least studied habitat zones on earth due to high costs and technological limitations. Here, we characterize mesophotic communities in two marine reserves across a range of habitat types, depths, and temperatures using submersible technologies, with the goal of understanding the processes that structure these communities across biogeographic regions....

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