36 Works

Through the taste buds of a large herbivore: foodscape modeling contributes to an understanding of forage selection processes

Antoine Duparc, Mathieu Garel, Pascal Marchand, Dominique Dubray, Daniel Maillard & Anne Loison
How large herbivores track resource quantity and quality through time has formed the core of an abundance of literature on migratory populations in recent decades. Yet, relating foraging processes and habitat selection patterns in resident populations, where spatial heterogeneity of food resources is fine‐grained and/or where the portion of edible plants (i.e. the foodscape) is low, is challenging. We addressed this issue in a mountain population of chamois Rupicapra rupicapra, an intermediate feeder, whose individuals...

Data from: Admixture between released and wild game birds: a changing genetic landscape in European mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

Pär Söderquist, Johan Elmberg, Gunnar Gunnarsson, Carl-Gustaf Thulin, Jocelyn Champagnon, Matthieu Guillemain, Jakub Kreisinger, Herbert H. T. Prins, Richard P. M. A. Crooijmans & Robert H. S. Kraus
Disruption of naturally evolved spatial patterns of genetic variation and local adaptations is a growing concern in wildlife management and conservation. During the last decade, releases of native taxa with potentially non-native genotypes have received increased attention. This has mostly concerned conservation programs, but releases are also widely carried out to boost harvest opportunities. The mallard, Anas platyrhynchos, is one of few terrestrial migratory vertebrates subjected to large-scale releases for hunting purposes. It is the...

Data from: From gestation to weaning: combining robust design and multi-event models unveils cost of lactation in a large herbivore

Quentin Richard, Carole Toïgo, Joël Appolinaire, Anne Loison & Mathieu Garel
1. The cost of current reproduction on survival or future reproduction is one of the most studied trade-offs governing resource distribution between fitness components. Results have often been clouded, however, by the existence of individual heterogeneity, with high-quality individuals able to allocate energy to several functions simultaneously, at no apparent cost. 2. Surprisingly, it has also rarely been assessed within a breeding season by breaking down the various reproductive efforts of females from gestation to...

Data from: Cohort variation in individual body mass dissipates with age in large herbivores

Sandra Hamel, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Nigel G. Yoccoz, Steve Albon, Steeve D. Côté, Joseph M. Craine, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Mathieu Garel, Phyllis Lee, Cynthia Moss, Daniel H. Nussey, Fanie Pelletier, Audun Stien & Torkild Tveraa
Environmental conditions experienced during early growth and development markedly shape phenotypic traits. Consequently, individuals of the same cohort may show similar life-history tactics throughout life. Conditions experienced later in life, however, could fine-tune these initial differences, either increasing (cumulative effect) or decreasing (compensatory effect) the magnitude of cohort variation with increasing age. Our novel comparative analysis that quantifies cohort variation in individual body size trajectories shows that initial cohort variation dissipates throughout life, and that...

Data from: Unveiling the diet of elusive rainforest herbivores in next generation sequencing era? The tapir as a case study

Fabrice Hibert, Pierre Taberlet, Jérôme Chave, Caroline Scotti-Saintagne, Daniel Sabatier & Cécile Richard-Hansen
Characterizing the trophic relationships between large herbivores and the outstanding plant diversity in rainforest is a major challenge because of their elusiveness. This is crucial to understand the role of these herbivores in the functioning of the rainforest ecosystems. We tested a non-invasive approach based on the high-throughput sequencing of environmental samples using small plant plastid sequences (the trnL P6 loop) and ribosomal ITS1 primers, referred to as DNA metabarcoding, to investigate the diet of...

Data from: The cost of growing large: sex-specific costs of post-weaning growth on body mass senescence in a wild mammal

Frédéric Douhard, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Maryline Pellerin, Laurent Jacob & Jean-François Lemaître
Individual body mass often positively correlates with survival and reproductive success, whereas fitness costs of growing large are rarely detected in vertebrates in the wild. Evidence that adult body mass progressively declines with increasing age is accumulating across mammalian populations. Growing fast to a large body can increase the cellular damage accumulated throughout life, leading body growth in early life to be negatively associated with the rate of body mass senescence. Moreover, the onset of...

Data from: Altitude shapes the environmental drivers of large-scale variation in abundance of a widespread mammal species

Mickaël Jacquier, Clément Calenge, Ludovic Say, Sébastien Devillard & Sandrine Ruette
Habitat quality and heterogeneity directly influence the distribution and abundance of organisms at different spatial scales. Determining the main environmental factors driving the variation in species abundance is crucial to understand the underlying ecological processes and this is especially important for widely distributed species living in contrasting environments. However, the responses to environmental variation are usually described at relatively small spatial scales. Here, we studied the variation in abundance of a widely distributed mustelid, the...

Data from: Mapping and explaining wolf recolonization in France using dynamic occupancy models and opportunistic data

Julie Louvrier, Christophe Duchamp, Valentin Lauret, Eric Marboutin, Sarah Cubaynes, Rémi Choquet, Christian Miquel & Olivier Gimenez
While large carnivores are recovering in Europe, assessing their distributions can help to predict and mitigate conflicts with human activities. Because they are highly mobile, elusive and live at very low density, modeling their distributions presents several challenges due to i) their imperfect detectability, ii) their dynamic ranges over time and iii) their monitoring at large scales consisting mainly of opportunistic data without a formal measure of the sampling effort. Here, we focused on wolves...

Data from: From steps to home range formation: species-specific movement upscaling among sympatric ungulates

Zulima Tablado, Eloy Revilla, Dominique Dubray, Sonia Saïd, Daniel Maillard & Anne Loison
Animals move to interact with the environment in order to find food resources and cover. Intrinsic characteristics affecting feeding and antipredatory strategies likely shape variation in movement patterns and home range formation between individuals, populations and species. Browsing herbivores selectively forage on patchily distributed resources in areas with more canopy cover, whereas mixed feeders and grazers feed on more open grasslands and tend to aggregate as an antipredatory strategy. We therefore predicted that at small...

Data from: Combining familiarity and landscape features helps break down the barriers between movements and home ranges in a non-territorial large herbivore

Pascal Marchand, Mathieu Garel, Gilles Bourgoin, Antoine Duparc, Dominique Dubray, Daniel Maillard & Anne Loison
Recent advances in animal ecology have enabled identification of certain mechanisms that lead to the emergence of territories and home ranges from movements considered as unbounded. Among them, memory and familiarity have been identified as key parameters in cognitive maps driving animal navigation, but have been only recently used in empirical analyses of animal movements. At the same time, the influence of landscape features on movements of numerous species and on space division in territorial...

Data from: Estimating age and age class of harvested hog deer from eye lens mass using frequentist and Bayesian methods

David M. Forsyth, Mathieu Garel & Steve R. McLeod
Estimation of the age or age class of harvested animals is often necessary to interpret the condition and dynamics of wildlife populations. The mammalian eye lens continues to grow until death and hence the dry mass of the eye lens has commonly been used to estimate the age of mammals. The method requires the relationship between eye lens mass and age to be parameterized using individuals of known age. However, predicting age is complicated by...

Data from: Genomic evidence of demographic fluctuations and lack of genetic structure across flyways in a long distance migrant, the European turtle dove

Luciano Calderón, Leonardo Campagna, Thomas Wilke, Hervé Lormee, Cyril Eraud, Jenny C. Dunn, Gregorio Rocha, Pavel Zehtindjiev, Dimitrios E. Bakaloudis, Benjamin Metzger, Jacopo G. Cecere, Melanie Marx & Petra Quillfeldt
Background: Understanding how past climatic oscillations have affected organismic evolution will help predict the impact that current climate change has on living organisms. The European turtle dove, Streptopelia turtur, is a warm-temperature adapted species and a long distance migrant that uses multiple flyways to move between Europe and Africa. Despite being abundant, it is categorized as vulnerable because of a long-term demographic decline. We studied the demographic history and population genetic structure of the European...

Data from: Circadian periodicity in space use by ungulates of temperate regions: how much, when, and why?

Guillaume Peron, Antoine Duparc, Mathieu Garel, Pascal Marchand, Nicolas Morellet, Sonia Said & Anne Loison
1. When they visit and revisit specific areas, animals may reveal what they need from their home range and how they acquire information. The temporal dimension of such movement recursions, i.e., periodicity, is however rarely studied, yet potentially bears a species, population, or individual-specific signature. 2. A recent method allows estimating the contribution of periodic patterns to the variance in a movement path. We applied it to 709 individuals from 5 ungulate species, looking for...

Data from: Habitat specialization predicts genetic response to fragmentation in tropical birds

Aurélie Khimoun, Cyril Eraud, Anthony Ollivier, Emilie Arnoux, Vincent Rocheteau, Marine Bely, Emilie Lefol, Martin Delpuech, Marie-Laure Carpentier, Gilles Leblond, Anthony Levesque, Anais Charbonnel, Bruno Faivre & Stéphane Garnier
Habitat fragmentation is one of the most severe threats to biodiversity as it may lead to changes in population genetic structure, with ultimate modifications of species evolutionary potential and local extinctions. Nonetheless, fragmentation does not equally affect all species and identifying which ecological traits are related to species sensitivity to habitat fragmentation could help prioritization of conservation efforts. Despite the theoretical link between species ecology and extinction proneness, comparative studies explicitly testing the hypothesis that...

Data from: The influence of early-life allocation to antlers on male performance during adulthood: evidence from contrasted populations of a large herbivore

Jean-François Lemaître, Louise Cheynel, Frederic Douhard, Gilles Bourgoin, François Débias, Hubert Ferté, Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont, Sylvia Pardonnet, Maryline Pellerin, Benjamin Rey, Cécile Vanpé, A.J. Mark Hewison, Jean-Michel Gaillard & A. J. Mark Hewison
1. To secure mating opportunities, males often develop and maintain conspicuous traits that are involved in intra-sexual and/or inter-sexual competition. While current models of sexual selection rely on the assumption that producing such traits is costly, quantifying the cost of allocating to secondary sexual traits remains challenging. 2. According to the principle of allocation, high energy allocation to growth or sexual traits in males should lead to reduced energy allocation to the maintenance of cellular...

Data from: Phylogeography of the small Indian civet and origin of introductions to western Indian Ocean islands

Philippe Gaubert, Riddhi Patel, Geraldine Veron, Steve M. Goodman, Maraike Willsch, Raquel Vasconcelos, Andre Lourenço, Marie Sigaud, Fabienne Justy, Bheem Dutt Joshi, Joerns Fickel & Abdreas Wilting
The biogeographic dynamics affecting the Indian subcontinent, East and Southeast Asia during the Plio-Pleistocene has generated complex biodiversity patterns. We assessed the molecular biogeography of the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica) through mitogenome and cytochrome b + control region sequencing of 89 historical and modern samples to (i) establish a time-calibrated phylogeography across the species’ native range and (ii) test introduction scenarios to western Indian Ocean islands. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified three geographic lineages (East...

Data from: High hunting pressure selects for earlier birth date: wild boar as a case study

Marlène Gamelon, Aurélien Besnard, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Sabrina Servanty, Eric Baubet, Serge Brandt & Olivier Gimenez
Exploitation by humans affects the size and structure of populations. This has evolutionary and demographic consequences that have typically being studied independent of one another. We here applied a framework recently developed applying quantitative tools from population ecology and selection gradient analysis to quantify the selection on a quantitative trait - birth date - through its association with multiple fitness components. From the long-term monitoring (22 years) of a wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) population...

Data from: Landscape genetic analyses reveal fine-scale effects of forest fragmentation in an insular tropical bird

Aurélie Khimoun, William Peterman, Cyril Eraud, Bruno Faivre, Nicolas Navarro & Stéphane Garnier
Within the framework of landscape genetics, resistance surface modelling is particularly relevant to explicitly test competing hypotheses about landscape effects on gene flow. To investigate how fragmentation of tropical forest affects population connectivity in a forest specialist bird species, we optimized resistance surfaces without a priori specification, using least-cost (LCP) or resistance (IBR) distances. We implemented a two-step procedure in order (i) to objectively define the landscape thematic resolution (level of detail in classification scheme...

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Epizoochorous dispersal by ungulates depends on fur, grooming and social interactions

Océane Liehrmann, Flore Jégoux, Marie-Alice Guilbert, Francis Isselin-Nondedeu, Sonia Saïd, Yann Locatelli & Christophe Baltzinger
The transport phase of the animal-mediated plant dispersal process is critical to dispersal effectiveness as it determines the spatial distribution of the diaspores released and their chance for further recruitment. Assessing this specific phase of the dispersal process generally requires combining diaspore retention times with the associated distances covered. Here, we specifically tested the effect of grooming behavior, interindividual contacts and ungulate fur on diaspore retention times and associated dispersal distances for the hooked diaspores...

Data from: A single multiplex of twelve microsatellite markers for the simultaneous study of the brown hare (Lepus europaeus) and the mountain hare (Lepus timidus)

Marie-Pauline Beugin, Jérôme Letty, Cécile Kaerle, Jean-Sébastien Guitton, Lina Muselet, Guillaume Queney & Dominique Pontier
The management of hunted species is challenging, as it must conciliate the conservation of species and their sustainable exploitation. Non-genetic tools are widely used in this context but they may present limitations notably when species can hybridize or when large-scale spatial monitoring is required to establish optimal management actions. This is why genetic tools have been more and more integrated in wildlife management practices. However, the markers proposed are often amplified in small multiplexes when...

Data from: Evidence of reduced individual heterogeneity in adult survival of long-lived species

Guillaume Peron, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Christophe Barbraud, Christophe Bonenfant, Anne Charmantier, Rémi Choquet, Tim Coulson, Vladimir Grosbois, Anne Loison, GIlbert Marzolin, Norman Owen-Smtih, Déborah Pardo, Floriane Plard, Roger Pradel, Carole Toïgo, Olivier Gimenez & Norman Owen-Smith
The canalization hypothesis postulates that the rate at which trait variation generates variation in the average individual fitness in a population determines how buffered traits are against environmental and genetic factors. The ranking of a species on the slow-fast continuum – the covariation among life-history traits describing species-specific life cycles along a gradient going from a long life, slow maturity, and low annual reproductive output, to a short life, fast maturity, and high annual reproductive...

Data from: Pyrenean ptarmigan decline under climatic and human influences through the Holocene

Nicolas Bech, Corentin M. Barbu, Erwan Quéméré, Claude Novoa, Jean François Allienne & J. Boissier
In Europe, the Quaternary is characterized by climatic fluctuations known to have led to many cycles of contraction and expansion of species geographical ranges. In addition, during the Holocene, historical changes in human occupation such as colonization or abandonment of traditional land uses can also affect habitats. These climatically or anthropically induced geographic range changes are expected to produce considerable effective populations size change, measurable in terms of genetic diversity and organization. The rock ptarmigan...

Data from: Patterns and correlates of claims for brown bear damage on a continental scale

Carlos Bautista, Javier Naves, Eloy Revilla, Néstor Fernández, Jörg Albrecht, Anne K. Scharf, Robin Rigg, Alexandros A. Karamanlidis, Klemen Jerina, Djuro Huber, Santiago Palazón, Raido Kont, Paolo Ciucci, Claudio Groff, Aleksandar Dutsov, Juan Seijas, Pierre-Ives Quenette, Agnieszka Olszańska, Maryna Shkvyria, Michal Adamec, Janis Ozolins, Marko Jonozovič & Nuria Selva
Wildlife damage to human property threatens human–wildlife coexistence. Conflicts arising from wildlife damage in intensively managed landscapes often undermine conservation efforts, making damage mitigation and compensation of special concern for wildlife conservation. However, the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of damage and claims at large scales are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the patterns of damage caused by brown bears Ursus arctos and its ecological and socio-economic correlates at a continental scale. We compiled information...

Data from: Migration routes and staging areas of trans-Saharan Turtle Doves appraised from light-level geolocators

Cyril Eraud, Marcel Rivière, Hervé Lormée, James W. Fox, Jean-Jacques Ducamp & Jean-Marie Boutin
The identification of migration routes, wintering grounds and stopover sites are crucial issues for the understanding of the Palearctic-African bird migration system as well as for the development of relevant conservation strategies for trans-Saharan migrants. Using miniaturized light-level geolocators we report a comprehensive and detailed year round track of a granivorous trans-Saharan migrant, the European Turtle Dove (Streptopelia turtur). From five recovered loggers, our data provide new insights on migratory journeys and winter destinations of...

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