6 Works

Shallow population structure and shared phylogeographic and demographic patterns in seven Amazonian White-Sand ecosystems birds

João Marcos Guimarães Capurucho, Mary Ashley, Cintia Cornelius, Sérgio Borges, Camila Ribas & John Bates
White-sand ecosystems (WSE) have a patchy distribution throughout Amazonia and harbor a specialized community of birds. The patchiness of WSE lead to the expectation of highly fragmented and isolated populations across Amazonia. Additionally, the sandy substrate could render these ecosystems vulnerable climatic changes. We performed a comparative phylogeographic study of seven WSE birds using Ultra-conserved elements to evaluate their relation to Amazonian environmental and landscape history and the occurrence of shared patterns. Genetic structure varied...

Data from: The evolution of polymorphism in the warning coloration of the Amazonian poison frog Adelphobates galactonotus

Diana Rojas, Paolo Momigliano, Albertina Pimentel Lima, Pedro Ivo Simões, Rachel Y. Dudaniec, Teresa C. S. Avila-Pires, Marinus S. Hoogmoed, Youszef O. C. Bitar, Igor Luis Kaefer, Adolfo Amézquita & Adam Stow
While intraspecific variation in aposematic signals can be selected for by different predatory responses, their evolution is also contingent on other processes shaping genetic variation. We evaluate the relative contributions of selection, geographic isolation and random genetic drift to the evolution of aposematic color polymorphism in the poison frog Adelphobates galactonotus, distributed throughout eastern Brazilian Amazonia. Dorsal coloration was measured for 111 individuals and genetic data were obtained from 220 individuals at two mitochondrial genes...

Eighty-four per cent of all Amazonian arboreal plant individuals are useful to humans

Sara D. Coelho, Carolina Levis, Fabrício B. Baccaro, Fernando O. G. Figueiredo, André Pinassi Antunes, Hans Ter Steege, Marielos Peña-Claros, Juliana Schietti & Charles R. Clement
Plants have been used in Amazonian forests for millennia and some of these plants are disproportionally abundant (hyperdominant). At local scales, people generally use the most abundant plants, which may be abundant as the result of management of indigenous peoples and local communities. However, it is unknown whether plant use is also associated with abundance at larger scales. We used the population sizes of 4,454 arboreal species (trees and palms) estimated from 1946 forest plots...

Pied tamarins go multimodal in response to anthropogenic noise

Tainara Sobroza, Jacob Dunn, Marcelo Gordo & Adrian Barnett
Sounds produced by human activities are often loud and may mask acoustic signals used by other species for communication. To circumvent this, animals may use various strategies, including shifting modality completely or complementing acoustic information by also using another modality of communication. Here we tested the overlooked multimodal shift hypothesis using pied tamarins (Saguinus bicolor) as models. We predicted that in noisier areas the species would exhibit more scent marking behaviour (i.e., olfactory communication), while...

A “Dirty” Footprint: Soil macrofauna biodiversity and fertility in Amazonian Dark Earths and adjacent soils

Wilian C. Demetrio, Ana C. Conrado, Agno N. S. Acioli, Alexandre C. Ferreira, Marie L. C. Bartz, Samuel W. James, Elodie Silva, Lilianne S. Maia, Gilvan C. Martins, Rodrigo S. Macedo, David W. G. Stanton, Patrick Lavelle, Elena Velasquez, Anne Zangerlé, Rafaella Barbosa, Sandra C. Tapia‐Coral, Aleksander W. Muniz, Alessandra Santos, Talita Ferreira, Rodrigo F. Segalla, Thibaud Decaëns, Herlon S. Nadolny, Clara P. Peña‐Venegas, Cláudia M. B. F. Maia, Amarildo Pasini … & George G. Brown
Amazonian rainforests once thought to hold an innate pristine wilderness, are increasingly known to have been densely inhabited by populations showing a diverse and complex cultural background prior to European arrival. To what extent these societies impacted their landscape is unclear. Amazonian Dark Earths (ADEs) are fertile soils found throughout the Amazon Basin, created by pre-Columbian societies as a result of more sedentary habits. Much is known of the chemistry of these soils, yet their...

Ants of the State of Pará, Brazil: a historical and comprehensive dataset of a key biodiversity hotspot in the Amazon Basin

Emília Zoppas De Albuquerque, Lívia Pires Do Prado, Joudellys Andrade-Silva, Emely Laira Silva De Siqueira, Kelly Liane Da Silva Sampaio, Diego Alves, Carlos Roberto F. Brandão, Paloma L. Andrade, Rodrigo Machado Feitosa, Elmo Borges De Azevedo Koch, Jacques Hubert Charles Delabie, Itanna Fernandes, Fabrício Beggiato Baccaro, Jorge Luiz Pereira Souza, Rony Peterson Almeida & Rogério R. Silva
The state of Pará in northern Brazil is located entirely within the Amazon Basin and harbors a great diversity of landscape and vegetation types that support high levels of biodiversity. Here, we provide a comprehensive inventory of ant species and their distribution in Pará. This regional list is based on an extensive review of species records from published and unpublished sources covering a period of 134 years (1886–2020) and includes the five most representative ant...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Federal University of Amazonas
    6
  • National Institute of Amazonian Research
    5
  • Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi
    3
  • Federal University of Paraná
    2
  • Anglia Ruskin University
    1
  • National Museum of Natural History
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    1
  • Maharishi International University
    1
  • Londrina State University
    1