6 Works

Data from: Spatial and ecological population genetic structures within two island-endemic Aeonium species of different niche width

David E. V. Harter, Mike Thiv, Alfons Weig, Anke Jentsch & Carl Beierkuhnlein
The Crassulacean genus Aeonium is a well-known example for plant species radiation on oceanic archipelagos. However, while allopatric speciation among islands is documented for this genus, the role of intra-island speciation due to population divergence by topographical isolation or ecological heterogeneity has not yet been addressed. The aim of this study was to investigate intraspecific genetic structures and to identify spatial and ecological drivers of genetic population differentiation on the island scale. We analyzed inter...

Data from: Pest control of aphids depends on landscape complexity and natural enemy interactions

Emily A. Martin, Björn Reineking, Bumsuk Seo & Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter
Aphids are a major concern in agricultural crops worldwide, and control by natural enemies is an essential component of the ecological intensification of agriculture. Although the complexity of agricultural landscapes is known to influence natural enemies of pests, few studies have measured the degree of pest control by different enemy guilds across gradients in landscape complexity. Here, we use multiple natural-enemy exclosures replicated in 18 fields across a gradient in landscape complexity to investigate (1)...

Data from: Size dependency in colour patterns of Western Palearctic carabids

Andreas H. Schweiger & Carl Beierkuhnlein
Body colouration is of high evolutionary relevance for most animals. Several competing hypotheses exist regarding the evolutionary reasons for animal colouration ranging from predator avoidance and sexual advertisement to neutral selection. Among these hypotheses, biophysical principles suggest the thermoregulatory importance of dark colouration which in turn strongly depends on species body size. This body size – darkness trade-off is based on sound theoretical background conceptualized in the thermal melanism hypothesis and is confirmed by numerous...

Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness

Lauchlan H. Fraser, Jason Pither, Anke Jentsch, Marcelo Sternberg, Martin Zobel, Diana Askarizadeh, Sandor Bartha, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Jonathan A. Bennett, Alex Bittel, Bazartseren Boldgiv, Ilsi I. Boldrini, Edward Bork, Leslie Brown, Marcelo Cabido, James Cahill, Cameron N. Carlyle, Giandiego Campetella, Stefano Chelli, Ofer Cohen, Anna-Maria Csergo, Sandra Diaz, Lucas Enrico, David Ensing, Alessandra Fidelis … & Szilárd Szentes
The search for predictions of species diversity across environmental gradients has challenged ecologists for decades. The humped-back model (HBM) suggests that plant diversity peaks at intermediate productivity; at low productivity few species can tolerate the environmental stresses, and at high productivity a few highly competitive species dominate. Over time the HBM has become increasingly controversial, and recent studies claim to have refuted it. Here, by using data from coordinated surveys conducted throughout grasslands worldwide and...

Data from: Climate vs. topography – spatial patterns of plant species diversity and endemism on a high-elevation island

Severin D. H. Irl, David E. V. Harter, Manuel J. Steinbauer, David Gallego Puyol, José María Fernández-Palacios, Anke Jentsch & Carl Beierkuhnlein
1. Climate and topography are among the most fundamental drivers of plant diversity. Here, we assess the importance of climate and topography in explaining diversity patterns of species richness, endemic richness and endemicity on the landscape scale of an oceanic island, and evaluate the independent contribution of climatic and topographic variables to spatial diversity patterns. 2. We constructed a presence/absence matrix of perennial endemic and native vascular plant species (including subspecies) in 890 plots on...

Data from: Redistribution of soil water by a saprotrophic fungus enhances carbon mineralization

Alexander Guhr, Werner Borken, Marie Spohn & Egbert Matzner
The desiccation of upper soil horizons is a common phenomenon, leading to a decrease in soil microbial activity and mineralization. Recent studies have shown that fungal communities and fungal-based food webs are less sensitive and better adapted to soil desiccation than bacterial-based food webs. One reason for a better fungal adaptation to soil desiccation may be hydraulic redistribution of water by mycelia networks. Here we show that a saprotrophic fungus (Agaricus bisporus) redistributes water from...

Registration Year

  • 2015
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Affiliations

  • University of Bayreuth
    6
  • University of Camerino
    1
  • University of Kansas
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  • Islamic Azad University
    1
  • Sao Paulo State University
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  • University of Würzburg
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  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • Ferdowsi University of Mashhad
    1
  • Princeton University
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  • Institute of Ecology and Botany
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