23 Works

Data from: An inverse latitudinal gradient in speciation rate for marine fishes

Daniel L. Rabosky, Jonathan Chang, Pascal O. Title, Peter F. Cowman, Lauren Sallan, Matt Friedman, Kristin Kaschner, Cristina Garilao, Thomas J. Near, Marta Coll & Michael E. Alfaro
Far more species of organisms are found in the tropics than in temperate and polar regions, but the evolutionary and ecological causes of this pattern remain controversial1,2. Tropical marine fish communities are much more diverse than cold-water fish communities found at higher latitudes3,4, and several explanations for this latitudinal diversity gradient propose that warm reef environments serve as evolutionary ‘hotspots’ for species formation5,6,7,8. Here we test the relationship between latitude, species richness and speciation rate...

Data from: Disturbance intensity is a stronger driver of biomass recovery than remaining tree-community attributes in a managed Amazonian forest

Angela L. De Avila, Masha T. Van Der Sande, Carsten F. Dormann, Marielos Peña-Claros, Lourens Poorter, Lucas Mazzei, Ademir R. Ruschel, José N. M. Silva, João O. P. De Carvalho & Jürgen Bauhus
1.Forest recovery following management interventions is important to maintain ecosystem functioning and the provision of ecosystem services. It remains, however, largely unclear how aboveground biomass (AGB) recovery of species-rich tropical forests is affected by disturbance intensity and post-disturbance (remaining) tree-community attributes, following logging and thinning interventions. 2.We investigated whether annual AGB increment (∆AGB) decreases with management-related disturbance intensity (disturbance hypothesis), and increases with the diversity (niche-complementarity hypothesis) and the community-weighted mean (CWM) of acquisitive traits...

Data from: Assessing changes in arthropod predator-prey interactions through DNA-based gut content analysis - variable environment, stable diet

Bernhard Eitzinger, Nerea Abrego, Dominique Gravel, Tea Huotari, Eero J. Vesterinen & Tomas Roslin
Analyzing the structure and dynamics of biotic interaction networks and the processes shaping them is currently one of the key fields in ecology. In this paper, we develop a novel approach to gut content analysis, thereby deriving a new perspective on community interactions and their responses to environment. For this, we use an elevational gradient in the High Arctic, asking how the environment and species traits interact in shaping predator-prey interactions involving the wolf spider...

Data from: Frequency dependence of pollinator visitation rates suggests that pollination niches can allow plant species coexistence

Gita Benadi & Anton Pauw
1. How do many species coexist within a trophic level? Resource niches are the classical answer, but in plants which share a small set of abiotic resources the possibilities for resource partitioning are limited. One possible explanation is that plant species have different pollination niches, with each species specialized to a subset of the available animal species. If this pollinator partitioning results in negative frequency dependence such that each plant species’ reproduction is reduced when...

Data from: Tree species richness increases ecosystem carbon storage in subtropical forests

Xiaojuan Liu, Stefan Trogisch, Jin-Sheng He, Pascal A. Niklaus, Helge Bruelheide, Zhiyao Tang, Alexandra Erfmeier, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen, Katherina A. Pietsch, Bo Yang, Peter Kühn, Thomas Scholten, Yuanyuan Huang, Chao Wang, Michael Staab, Katrin N. Leppert, Christian Wirth, Bernhard Schmid & Keping Ma
Forest ecosystems are an integral component of the global carbon cycle as they take up and release large amounts of C in short time (C flux) or accumulate it over longer time (C stock). However, there remains uncertainty about whether and in which direction C fluxes and in particular C stocks may differ between forests of high vs. low species richness. Based on a comprehensive dataset derived from field-based measurements, we tested the effect of...

Data from: Trap nests for bees and wasps to analyse trophic interactions in changing environments - a systematic overview and user guide

Michael Staab, Gesine Pufal, Teja Tscharntke & Alexandra-Maria Klein
1. Trap nests are artificially made nesting resources for solitary cavity-nesting bees and wasps and allow easy quantification of multiple trophic interactions between bees, wasps, their food objects and natural enemies. 2. We synthesized all trap nest studies available in the ISI Web of Science™ to provide a comprehensive overview of trap nest research and identify common practical challenges and promising future research directions. 3. Trap nests have been used on all continents and across...

Data from: Management trade-offs on ecosystem services in apple orchards across Europe: direct and indirect effects of organic production

Ulrika Samnegard, Georgina Alins, Virginie Boreux, Jordi Bosch, Daniel García, Anne-Kathrin Happe, Alexandra Klein, Marcos Miñarro, Karsten Mody, Mario Porcel, Anselm Rodrigo, Laura Roquer-Beni, Marco Tasin, Peter A. Hambäck & Alexandra-Maria Klein
1. Apple is considered the most important fruit crop in temperate areas and profitable production depends on multiple ecosystem services, including the reduction of pest damage and the provision of sufficient pollination levels. Management approaches present an inherent trade-off as each affects species differently. 2. We quantified the direct and indirect effects of management (organic versus integrated pest management (IPM)) on species richness, ecosystem services and fruit production in 85 apple orchards in three European...

Data from: Assessing cetacean surveys throughout the Mediterranean Sea: a gap analysis in environmental space

Laura Mannocci, Jason J. Roberts, Patrick N. Halpin, Matthieu Authier, Olivier Boisseau, Mohamed Nejmeddine Bradai, Ana Cañadas, Carla Chicote, Léa David, Nathalie Di-Méglio, Caterina M. Fortuna, Alexandros Frantzis, Manel Gazo, Tilen Genov, Philip S. Hammond, Drasko Holcer, Kristin Kaschner, Dani Kerem, Giancarlo Lauriano, Tim Lewis, Giuseppe Notarbartolo Di Sciara, Simone Panigada, Juan Antonio Raga, Aviad Scheinin, Vincent Ridoux … & Joseph Vella
Heterogeneous data collection in the marine environment has led to large gaps in our knowledge of marine species distributions. To fill these gaps, models calibrated on existing data may be used to predict species distributions in unsampled areas, given that available data are sufficiently representative. Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility of mapping cetacean densities across the entire Mediterranean Sea using models calibrated on available survey data and various environmental covariates. We aggregated 302,481...

Data from: The importance of individual heterogeneity for interpreting faecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels in wildlife studies

Joy Coppes, Jim-Lino Kämmerle, Mirjam Willert, Annette Kohnen, Rupert Palme & Veronika Braunisch
1. Being a non-invasive and inexpensive method, the analysis of faecal corticosteroid metabolites (FCM) is increasingly being applied in wildlife research. Various environmental factors have been shown to influence FCM levels, but most studies did not account for inter-individual variance, which we hypothesized may substantially affect the results. 2. We combined FCM analysis with genetic analysis to identify the sex and individual of samples collected in three consecutive winters, with repeated samples per individual, across...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Data from: Stress and early experience underlie dominance status and division of labour in a clonal insect

Abel Bernadou, Lukas Schrader, Julia Pable, Elisabeth Hoffacker, Karen Meusemann & Juergen Heinze
Cooperation and division of labour are fundamental in the “major transitions” in evolution. While the factors regulating cell differentiation in multicellular organisms are quite well understood, we are just beginning to unveil the mechanisms underlying individual specialization in cooperative groups of animals. Clonal ants allow studying which factors influence task allocation without confounding variation in genotype and morphology. Here, we subjected larvae and freshly hatched workers of the clonal ant Platythyrea punctata to different rearing...

Data from: Demography or selection on linked cultural traits or genes? Investigating the driver of low mtDNA diversity in the sperm whale using complementary mitochondrial and nuclear genome analyses

Phillip A. Morin, Andrew D. Foote, Charles Scott Baker, Brittany L. Hancock-Hanser, Kristin Kaschner, Bruce R. Mate, Sarah L. Mesnick, Victoria L. Pease, Patricia E. Rosel & Alana Alexander
Mitochondrial DNA has been heavily utilized in phylogeography studies for several decades. However, underlying patterns of demography and phylogeography may be misrepresented due to coalescence stochasticity, selection, variation in mutation rates, and cultural hitchhiking (linkage of genetic variation to culturally transmitted traits affecting fitness). Cultural hitchhiking has been suggested as an explanation for low genetic diversity in species with strong social structures, counteracting even high mobility, abundance and limited barriers to dispersal. One such species...

Data from: Systematics of the ant genus Proceratium Roger (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Proceratiinae) in China – with descriptions of three new species based on micro-CT enhanced next-generation-morphology

Michael Staab, Francisco Hita Garcia, Cong Liu, Zheng-Hui Xu & Evan P. Economo
The genus Proceratium Roger, 1863 contains cryptic, subterranean ants that are seldom sampled and rare in natural history collections. Furthermore, most Proceratium specimens are extremely hairy and, due to their enlarged and curved gaster, often mounted suboptimally. As a consequence, the poorly observable physical characteristics of the material and its scarcity result in a rather challenging alpha taxonomy of this group. In this study, the taxonomy of the Chinese Proceratium fauna is reviewed and updated...

Data from: Reanalyzing the Palaeoptera problem - the origin of insect flight remains obscure

Sabrina Simon, Alexander Blanke & Karen Meusemann
The phylogenetic relationships of the winged insect lineages – mayflies (Ephemeroptera), damselflies and dragonflies (Odonata), and all other winged insects (Neoptera) – are still controversial with three hypotheses supported by different datasets: Palaeoptera, Metapterygota and Chiastomyaria. Here, we reanalyze available phylogenomic data with a focus on detecting confounding and alternative signal. In this context, we provide a framework to quantitatively evaluate and assess incongruent molecular phylogenetic signal inherent in phylogenomic datasets. Despite overall support for...

Data from: Detection of somatic epigenetic variation in Norway spruce via targeted bisulfite sequencing

Katrin Heer, Kristian K. Ullrich, Manuel Hiss, Sascha Liepelt, Ralf Schulze Brüning, Jiabin Zou, Lars Opgenoorth, Stefan A. Rensing & Jiabin Zhou
Epigenetic mechanisms represent a possible mechanism for achieving a rapid response of long‐lived trees to changing environmental conditions. However, our knowledge on plant epigenetics is largely limited to a few model species. With increasing availability of genomic resources for many tree species, it is now possible to adopt approaches from model species that permit to obtain single‐base pair resolution data on methylation at a reasonable cost. Here, we used targeted bisulfite sequencing (TBS) to study...

Data from: Rapid evolution in native plants cultivated for ecological restoration: not a general pattern

Rouven Nagel, Walter Durka, Oliver Bossdorf & Anna Bucharova
The growing number of restoration projects worldwide increases the demand for seed material of native species. To meet this demand, seeds are often produced through large‐scale cultivation on specialized farms, using wild‐collected seeds as the original sources. However, during cultivation plants experience novel environmental conditions compared to those in natural populations, and there is a danger that the plants in cultivation are subject to unintended selection and lose their adaptation to natural habitats. Although the...

Data from: Below-ground resource partitioning alone cannot explain the biodiversity–ecosystem function relationship: a field test using multiple tracers

Annette Jesch, Kathryn E. Barry, Janneke M. Ravenek, Dörte Bachmann, Tanja Strecker, Alexandra Weigelt, Nina Buchmann, Hans De Kroon, Arthur Gessler, Liesje Mommer, Christiane Roscher & Michael Scherer-Lorenzen
1. Belowground resource partitioning is among the most prominent hypotheses for driving the positive biodiversity-ecosystem function relationship. However, experimental tests of this hypothesis in biodiversity experiments are scarce, and the available evidence is not consistent. 2. We tested the hypothesis that resource partitioning in space, in time, or in both space and time combined drives the positive effect of diversity on both plant productivity and community resource uptake. At the community level, we predicted that...

Data from: Biotic predictors complement models of bat and bird responses to climate and tree diversity in European forests

Luc Barbaro, Eric Allan, Evy Ampoorter, Bastien Castagneyrol, Yohan Charbonnier, Hans De Wandeler, Christian Kerbiriou, Harriet Milligan, Aude Vialatte, Monique Carnol, Marc Deconchat, Pallieter De Smedt, Herve Jactel, Julia Koricheva, Isabelle Le Viol, Bart Muys, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen, Kris Verheyen & Fons Van Der Plas
Bats and birds are key providers of ecosystem services in forests. How climate and habitat jointly shape their communities is well studied, but whether biotic predictors from other trophic levels may improve bird and bat diversity models is less known, especially across large bioclimatic gradients. Here, we achieved multi-taxa surveys in 209 mature forests replicated in six European countries from Spain to Finland, to investigate the importance of biotic predictors (i.e., the abundance or activity...

Data from: Longevity and transposon defense, the case of termite reproductives

Daniel Elsner, Karen Meusemann & Judith Korb
Social insects are promising new models in aging research. Within single colonies, longevity differences of several magnitudes exist that can be found elsewhere only between different species. Reproducing queens (and, in termites, also kings) can live for several decades, whereas sterile workers often have a lifespan of a few weeks only. We studied aging in the wild in a highly social insect, the termite Macrotermes bellicosus, which has one of the most pronounced longevity differences...

Data from: Isotopic evidence for oligotrophication of terrestrial ecosystems

Joseph M. Craine, Andrew J. Elmore, Lixin Wang, Julieta Aranibar, Marijn Bauters, Pascal Boeckx, Brooke E. Crowley, Melissa A. Dawes, Sylvain Delzon, Alex Fajardo, Yunting Fang, Lei Fujiyoshi, Alan Gray, Rossella Guerrieri, Michael J. Gundale, David J. Hawke, Peter Hietz, Mathieu Jonard, Elizabeth Kearsley, Tanaka Kenzo, Mikhail Makarov, Sara Marañón-Jiménez, Terrence P. McGlynn, Brenden E. McNeil, Stella G. Mosher … & Katarzyna Zmudczyńska-Skarbek
Human societies depend on an Earth System that operates within a constrained range of nutrient availability, yet the recent trajectory of terrestrial nitrogen (N) availability is uncertain. Examining patterns of foliar N concentrations ([N]) and isotope ratios (15N) from more than 42,000 samples acquired over 37 years, here we show that foliar [N] declined by 8% and foliar 15N declined by 0.8 – 1.9 ‰. Examining patterns across different climate spaces, foliar 15N declined across...

Data from: Land use intensity indirectly affects ecosystem services mainly through plant functional identity in a temperate forest

Verónica Chillo, Diego P. Vázquez, Mariano M. Amoroso & Elena M. Bennett
1.Land-use change is known to affect biodiversity, and there is increasing concern regarding how these changes may impact the provision of ecosystem services. Although functional composition (diversity and identity) could influence ecosystem properties and services at the community level, there is little quantitative understanding of these relationships in the field. Here, we evaluate the direct and indirect effects (through ecosystem properties) of biodiversity on the provision of multiple ecosystem services in native mixed forest in...

Data from: Environmental drivers of forest structure and stem turnover across Venezuelan tropical forests

Emilio Vilanova, Hirma Ramirez-Angulo, Armando Torres-Lezama, Gerardo Aymard, Luis Gámez, Cristabel Durán, Lionel Hernández, Rafael Herrera, Geertje Van Der Heijden, Oliver L. Phillips & Gregory J. Ettl
Using data from 50 long-term permanent plots from across Venezuelan forests in northern South America, we explored large-scale patterns of stem turnover, aboveground biomass (AGB) and woody productivity (AGWP), and the relationships between them and with potential climatic drivers. We used principal component analysis coupled with generalized least squares models to analyze the relationship between climate, forest structure and stem dynamics. Two major axes associated with orthogonal temperature and moisture gradients effectively described more than...

Data from: Impacts of species richness on productivity in a large-scale subtropical forest experiment

Yuanyuan Huang, Yuxin Chen, Nadia Castro-Izaguirre, Martin Baruffol, Matteo Brezzi, Anne Lang, Ying Li, Werner Härdtle, Werner Von Oheimb, Xuefeu Yang, Xiaojuan Liu, Kequan Pei, Sabine Both, Bo Yang, David Eichenberg, Thorsten Assmann, Jürgen Bauhus, Thorsten Behrens, François Buscot, Xiao-Yong Chen, Douglas Chester, Bing-Yang Ding, Walter Durka, Alexandra Erfmeier, Jingyun Fang … & Bernhard Schmid
Biodiversity experiments have shown that species loss reduces ecosystem functioning in grassland. To test whether this result can be extrapolated to forests, the main contributors to terrestrial primary productivity, requires large-scale experiments. We manipulated tree species richness by planting more than 150,000 trees in plots with 1 to 16 species. Simulating multiple extinction scenarios, we found that richness strongly increased stand-level productivity. After 8 years, 16-species mixtures had accumulated over twice the amount of carbon...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    23

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    23

Affiliations

  • University of Freiburg
    23
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    3
  • University of Bern
    3
  • Leipzig University
    3
  • Wageningen University & Research
    3
  • Ghent University
    2
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    2
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    2
  • Jingdezhen University
    2
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2