20 Works

Data from: Effects of age and reproductive status on individual foraging site fidelity in a long-lived marine predator

Stephen C. Votier, Annette L. Fayet, Stuart Bearhop, Thomas W. Bodey, Bethany L. Clark, James Grecian, Tim Guilford, Keith C. Hamer, Jana W.E. Jeglinski, Greg Morgan, Ewan Wakefield, Samantha C. Patrick & Jana W. E. Jeglinski
Individual foraging specializations, where individuals use a small component of the population niche width, are widespread in nature with important ecological and evolutionary implications. In long-lived animals, foraging ability develops with age, but we know little about the ontogeny of individuality in foraging. Here we use precision global positioning system (GPS) loggers to examine how individual foraging site fidelity (IFSF), a common component of foraging specialization, varies between breeders, failed breeders and immatures in a...

Data from: Impact of the Late Triassic mass extinction on functional diversity and composition of marine ecosystems

Alexander M. Dunhill, William J. Foster, James Sciberras & Richard J. Twitchett
Mass extinctions have profoundly influenced the history of life, not only through the death of species but also through changes in ecosystem function and structure. Importantly, these events allow us the opportunity to study ecological dynamics under levels of environmental stress for which there are no recent analogues. Here, we examine the impact and selectivity of the Late Triassic mass extinction event on the functional diversity and functional composition of the global marine ecosystem, and...

Data from: Mixing of porpoise ecotypes in southwestern UK waters revealed by genetic profiling

Michael C. Fontaine, Oliver Thatcher, Nicolas Ray, Sylvain Piry, Andrew Brownlow, Nicholas J. Davison, Paul Jepson, Rob Deaville & Simon J. Goodman
Contact zones between ecotypes are windows for understanding how species may react to climate changes. Here, we analysed the fine-scale genetic and morphological variation in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) around the UK by genotyping 591 stranded animals at nine microsatellite loci. The data were integrated with a prior study to map at high resolution the contact zone between two previously identified ecotypes meeting in the northern Bay of Biscay. Clustering and spatial analyses revealed that...

Data from: Drug delivery in a tumour cord model: a computational simulation

Matthew E. Hubbard, Maria Jove, Paul M. Loadman, Roger M. Phillips, Christopher J. Twelves & Stephen W. Smye
The tumour vasculature and microenvironment is complex and heterogeneous, contributing to reduced delivery of cancer drugs to the tumour. We have developed an in silico model of drug transport in a tumour cord to explore the effect of different drug regimes over a 72 h period and how changes in pharmacokinetic parameters affect tumour exposure to the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin. We used the model to describe the radial and axial distribution of drug in the...

Data from: Repeatable and heritable behavioural variation in a wild cooperative breeder

Hannah A. Edwards, Terry Burke & Hannah L. Dugdale
Quantifying consistent differences in behaviour among individuals is vital to understanding the ecological and evolutionary significance of animal personality. To quantify personality, the phenotypic variation of a behavioural trait is partitioned to assess how it varies among individuals, which is also known as repeatability. If pedigree data are available, the phenotypic variation can then be further partitioned to estimate the additive genetic variance and heritability. Assessing the repeatability and heritability of personality traits therefore allows...

Data from: Social learning in otters

Zosia Ladds, William Hoppitt & Neeltje J. Boogert
The use of information provided by others to tackle life's challenges is widespread, but should not be employed indiscriminately if it is to be adaptive. Evidence is accumulating that animals are indeed selective and adopt ‘social learning strategies’. However, studies have generally focused on fish, bird and primate species. Here we extend research on social learning strategies to a taxonomic group that has been neglected until now: otters (subfamily Lutrinae). We collected social association data...

Data from: A national-scale model of linear features improves predictions of farmland biodiversity

Martin J. P. Sullivan, James W. Pearce-Higgins, Stuart E. Newson, Paul Scholefield, Tom Brereton & Tom H. Oliver
1. Modelling species distribution and abundance is important for many conservation applications, but it is typically performed using relatively coarse-scale environmental variables such as the area of broad land-cover types. Fine-scale environmental data capturing the most biologically-relevant variables have the potential to improve these models. For example, field studies have demonstrated the importance of linear features, such as hedgerows, for multiple taxa, but the absence of large-scale datasets of their extent prevents their inclusion in...

Data from: Quantifying and modelling decay in forecast proficiency indicates the limits of transferability in land-cover classification

Yoni Gavish, Jerome O’Connell, Tim G. Benton & Jerome O'Connell
1. The ability to provide reliable projections for the current and future distribution patterns of land-covers is fundamental if we wish to protect and manage our diminishing natural resources. Two inter-related revolutions made map productions feasible at unprecedented resolutions- the availability of high-resolution remotely-sensed data and the development of machine-learning algorithms. However, the ground-truth data needed for training models is in most cases spatially and temporally clustered. Therefore, map production requires extrapolation of models from...

Data from: Protein-mediated RNA folding governs sequence-specific interactions between rotavirus genome segments

Alexander Borodavka, Eric C. Dykeman, Waldemar Schrimpf & Don C. Lamb
Segmented RNA viruses are ubiquitous pathogens, which include influenza viruses and rotaviruses. A major challenge in understanding their assembly is the combinatorial problem of a non-random selection of a full genomic set of distinct RNAs. This process involves complex RNA-RNA and protein-RNA interactions, which are often obscured by non-specific binding at concentrations approaching in vivo assembly conditions. Here, we present direct experimental evidence of sequence-specific inter-segment interactions between rotavirus RNAs, taking place in a complex...

Data from: What controls variation in carbon use efficiency among Amazonian tropical forests?

Christopher E. Doughty, Gregory R. Goldsmith, Nicolas Raab, Cecile A. J. Girardin, Filio Farfan-Amezquita, Walter Huaraca Huasco, Javier E. Silva-Espejo, Alejandro Araujo-Murakami, Antonio C. L. Da Costa, Wanderley Rocha, David Galbraith, Patrick Meir, Dan B. Metcalfe, Yadvinder Malhi & Walter Huaraca-Huasco
Why do some forests produce biomass more efficiently than others? Variations in Carbon Use Efficiency (CUE: total Net Primary Production (NPP)/ Gross Primary Production (GPP)) may be due to changes in wood residence time (Biomass/NPPwood), temperature, or soil nutrient status. We tested these hypotheses in 14, one ha plots across Amazonian and Andean forests where we measured most key components of net primary production (NPP: wood, fine roots, and leaves) and autotrophic respiration (Ra; wood,...

Data from: Sex-specific density-dependent secretion of glucocorticoids in lizards: insights from laboratory and field experiments

Marianne Mugabo, Jean-François Le Galliard, Samuel Perret, Béatriz Decencière, Claudy Haussy, Meylan Sandrine & Sandrine Meylan
Negative density feedbacks have been extensively described in animal species and involve both consumptive (i.e. trophic interactions) and non-consumptive (i.e. social interactions) mechanisms. Glucocorticoids are a major component of the physiological stress response and homeostasis, and therefore make a good candidate for proximate determinants of negative density feedbacks. Here, we combined laboratory and field experiments with enclosed populations to investigate the relationship between density, social stress and plasma corticosterone levels in the common lizard Zootoca...

Data from: Analysis of the genome of the New Zealand giant collembolan (Holacanthella duospinosa) sheds light on hexapod evolution

Chen Wu, Melissa D. Jordan, Richard D. Newcomb, Neil J. Gemmell, Sarah Bank, Karen Meusemann, Peter K. Dearden, Elizabeth J. Duncan, Sefanie Grosser, Kim Rutherford, Paul P. Gardner, Ross N. Crowhurst, Bernd Steinwender, Leah K. Tooman, Mark I. Stevens & Thomas R. Buckley
Background: The New Zealand collembolan genus Holacanthella contains the largest species of springtails (Collembola) in the world. Using Illumina technology we have sequenced and assembled a draft genome and transcriptome from Holacanthella duospinosa (Salmon). We have used this annotated assembly to investigate the genetic basis of a range of traits critical to the evolution of the Hexapoda, the phylogenetic position of H. duospinosa and potential horizontal gene transfer events. Results: Our genome assembly was ~375...

Vertical profile data of light transmission in Atlantic forests along a disturbance gradient

S. Fauset, M.U. Gloor, M.A.P. Aidar, H.C. Freitas, N.M. Fyllas, C.A. Joly, M.A. Marabesi, A.L.C. Rochelle, A. Shenkin & S.A. Vieira
The data set contains vertical profiles of diffuse light transmittance measured within six forest plots in montane Atlantic forest, São Paulo state, Brazil. The plots measured include intact, previously logged and secondary forest in a large continuous forest block of the Serra do Mar State Park (Parque Estadual de Serra do Mar), and two forest fragments outside the park. In each plot 10 - 12 individual light profiles were recorded; the data set contains these...

Data from: Incorporating intraspecific trait variation into functional diversity: impacts of selective logging on birds in Borneo

Samuel R. P-J. Ross, Christopher Hassall, William J. E. Hoppitt, Felicity A. Edwards, David P. Edwards, Keith C. Hamer & Samuel R. P.-J. Ross
As conservation increasingly recognizes the importance of species’ functional roles in ecosystem processes, studies are shifting away from measuring species richness towards measures that account for the functional differences between species in a community. These functional diversity (FD) indices have received much recent attention and refinement, but their greatest limitation remains their inability to incorporate information about intraspecific trait variation (ITV). We use an individual-based model to account for ITV when calculating the functional diversity...

Data from: Joint care can outweigh costs of nonkin competition in communal breeders

Kat Bebbington, Eleanor A. Fairfield, Lewis G. Spurgin, Sjouke Anne Kingma, Hannah Dugdale, Jan Komdeur & David S. Richardson
Competition between offspring can greatly influence offspring fitness and parental investment decisions, especially in communal breeders where unrelated competitors have less incentive to concede resources. Given the potential for escalated conflict, it remains unclear what mechanisms facilitate the evolution of communal breeding among unrelated females. Resolving this question requires simultaneous consideration of offspring in noncommunal and communal nurseries, but such comparisons are missing. In the Seychelles warbler Acrocephalus sechellensis, we compare nestling pairs from communal...

Data from: Collective decision making in guppies: a cross-population comparison study in the wild

Romain J. G. Clément, Julián Vicente-Page, Richard P. Mann, Ashley J. W. Ward, Ralf H. J. M. Kurvers, Indar W. Ramnarine, Gonzalo G. De Polavieja & Jens Krause
Collective cognition has received much attention in recent years but most of the empirical work has focused on comparing individuals and groups within single populations, thereby not addressing evolutionary origins of collective cognition. Here we investigated collective cognition in multiple populations that are subject to different levels of predation. Guppies (Poecilia reticulata) were given a simultaneous choice between an edible and a non-edible stimulus. We found evidence for an improvement in decision accuracy when in...

Data from: Is saltmarsh restoration success constrained by matching natural environments or altered succession? a test using niche models

Martin J. P. Sullivan, Anthony J. Davy, Alastair Grant & Hannah L. Mossman
1.Restored habitats, such as saltmarsh created through managed realignment, sometimes fail to meet targets for biological equivalence with natural reference sites. Understanding why this happens is important in order to improve restoration outcomes. 2.Elevation in the tidal frame and sediment redox potential are major controls on the distribution of saltmarsh plants. We use niche models to characterize ten species’ responses to these, and test whether differences in species occurrence between restored and natural saltmarshes in...

Data from: On formation-based sampling proxies and why they should not be used to correct the fossil record

Alexander M. Dunhill, Bjarte Hannisdal, Neil Brocklehurst & Michael J. Benton
The fossil record is a unique resource on the history of life, but it is well known to be incomplete. In a series of high-profile papers, a residual modelling technique has been applied to correct the raw palaeodiversity signal for this bias and incompleteness, and the claim is made that the processed time series are more accurate than the raw data. We apply empirical and simulation approaches to test for correlation and directionality of any...

Data from: The role of species-specific sensory cues in male responses to mating rivals in Drosophila melanogaster fruitflies

Amanda Bretman, James Rouse, James D. Westmancoat & Tracey Chapman
Complex sets of cues can be important in recognising and responding to conspecific mating competitors and avoiding potentially costly heterospecific competitive interactions. Within Drosophila. melanogaster, males can detect sensory inputs from conspecifics to assess the level of competition. They respond to rivals by significantly extending mating duration and gain significant fitness benefits from doing so. Here, we tested the idea that the multiple sensory cues used by D. melanogaster males to detect conspecifics also function...

Data from: Measuring β‐diversity by remote sensing: a challenge for biodiversity monitoring

Duccio Rocchini, Sandra Luque, Nathalie Pettorelli, Lucy Bastin, Daniel Doktor, Nicolò Faedi, Hannes Feilhauer, Jean-Baptiste Féret, Giles M. Foody, Yoni Gavish, Sergio Godinho, William E. Kunin, Angela Lausch, Pedro J. Leitao, Matteo Marcantonio, Markus Neteler, Carlo Ricotta, Sebastian Schmidtlein, Petteri Vihervaara, Martin Wegmann & Harini Nagendra
Biodiversity includes multiscalar and multitemporal structures and processes, with different levels of functional organization, from genetic to ecosystemic levels. One of the mostly used methods to infer bio- diversity is based on taxonomic approaches and community ecology theories. However, gathering extensive data in the field is difficult due to logistic problems, especially when aiming at modelling biodiversity changes in space and time, which assumes statistically sound sampling schemes. In this context, airborne or satellite remote...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    20

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    20

Affiliations

  • University of Leeds
    20
  • University of Groningen
    3
  • University of East Anglia
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • University of Nottingham
    2
  • Zoological Society of London
    2
  • University of Exeter
    2
  • University of Sheffield
    2
  • Anglia Ruskin University
    1
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1