176 Works

Data from: Carrion fly-derived DNA metabarcoding is an effective tool for mammal surveys: evidence from a known tropical mammal community

Torrey W. Rodgers, Charles C. Y. Xu, Jacalyn Giacalone, Karen M. Kapheim, Kristin Saltonstall, Marta Vargas, Douglas W. Yu, Panu Somervuo, W. Owen McMillan & Patrick A. Jansen
Metabarcoding of vertebrate DNA derived from carrion flies has been proposed as a promising tool for biodiversity monitoring. To evaluate its efficacy, we conducted metabarcoding surveys of carrion flies on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama, which has a well-known mammal community, and compared our results against diurnal transect counts and camera-trapping. We collected 1084 flies in 29 sampling days, conducted metabarcoding with mammal-specific (16S) and vertebrate-specific (12S) primers, and sequenced amplicons on Illumina MiSeq. For...

Code for Individual Based Model to assess impact of KHV release on carp population

Kate Mintram, Cock Van Oosterhout & Jackie Lighten
1: Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) is one of the top global invasive vertebrates and can cause significant ecological damage. The Australian Government’s National Carp Control Program (NCCP) proposes to release Koi Herpesvirus (KHV) to eradicate feral carp in one of the largest ecological interventions ever attempted. Ecological and human health risks have been highlighted regarding the release of a highly pathogenic viral biocontrol for an aquatic species. The efficacy of KHV has also been questioned,...

Data from: Socio-ecological conditions and female infidelity in the Seychelles warbler

Sara Raj Pant, Jan Komdeur, Terry A. Burke, Hannah L. Dugdale & David S. Richardson
Within socially monogamous breeding systems, levels of extra-pair paternity can vary not only between species, populations and individuals, but also across time. Uncovering how different extrinsic conditions (ecological, demographic and social) influence this behavior will help shed light on the factors driving its evolution. Here, we simultaneously address multiple socio-ecological conditions potentially influencing female infidelity in a natural population of the cooperatively breeding Seychelles warbler, Acrocephalus sechellensis. Our contained study population has been monitored for...

Data from: Fertility and mortality impacts of experimental heatwave conditions on different life stages and their reproductive recovery in a model insect

Matthew Gage
With climate change creating a more volatile atmosphere, heatwaves will become stronger and more frequent, influencing living systems. Using the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, we measure the impacts of experimental heatwaves on reproduction and survival across different insect life stages, and the extent and pace of any recovery. We exposed larvae, pupae, juvenile and mature adult male beetles to 5-day heatwaves at 40°C or 42°C, a few degrees above the 35°C optimum for this species’...

Data from: The influence of Late Quaternary climate-change velocity on species endemism

Brody Sandel, Lars Arge, Richard G. Davies, Kevin J. Gaston, William J. Sutherland, Bo Dalsgaard & Jens-Chrisitan Svenning
The effects of climate change on biodiversity should depend in part on climate displacement rate (climate-change velocity) and its interaction with species’ capacity to migrate. We estimated Late Quaternary glacial-interglacial climate-change velocity by integrating macroclimatic shifts since the Last Glacial Maximum with topoclimatic gradients. Globally, areas with high velocities were associated with marked absences of small-ranged amphibians, mammals and birds. The association between endemism and velocity was weakest in the highly vagile birds and strongest...

Data from: Abundance drives broad patterns of generalisation in plant-hummingbird pollination networks

Benno I. Simmons, Jeferson Vizentin-Bugoni, Pietro K. Maruyama, Peter A. Cotton, Oscar H. Marín-Gómez, Carlos Lara, Liliana Rosero-Lasprilla, María A Maglianesi, Raúl Ortiz-Pulido, Márcia A. Rocca, Licléia C. Rodrigues, Boris Tinocco, Marcelo F. Vasconcelos, Marlies Sazima, Ana M. Martín González, Jesper Sonne, Carsten Rahbek, Lynn V. Dicks, Bo Dalsgaard & William J. Sutherland
Abundant pollinators are often more generalised than rare pollinators. This could be because abundant species have more chance encounters with potential interaction partners. On the other hand, generalised species could have a competitive advantage over specialists, leading to higher abundance. Determining the direction of the abundance-generalisation relationship is therefore a ‘chicken-and-egg’ dilemma. Here we determine the direction of the relationship between abundance and generalisation in plant-hummingbird pollination networks across the Americas. We find evidence that...

Inbreeding reduces fitness of seed beetles under thermal stress

Edward Ivimey-Cook, Sophie Bricout, Victoria Candela, Alexei Maklakov & Elena Berg
Human-induced environmental change can influence populations both at the global level through climatic warming and at the local level through habitat fragmentation. As populations become more isolated, they can suffer from high levels of inbreeding which contributes to a reduction in fitness, termed inbreeding depression. However, it is still unclear if this increase in homozygosity also results in a corresponding increase in sensitivity to stressful conditions, which could intensify the already detrimental effects of environmental...

Functional biogeography of Neotropical moist forests: trait-climate relationships and assembly patterns of tree communities

Bruno Pinho, Marcelo Tabarelli, Cajo Ter Braak, S. J. Wright, Victor Arroyo-Rodriguez, Maíra Benchimol, Bettina Engelbrecht, Simon Pierce, Peter Hietz, Bráulio Santos, Carlos Peres, Sandra Müller, Ian Wright, Frans Bongers, Madelon Lohbeck, Ülo Niinemets, Martijn Slot, Steven Jansen, Davi Jamelli, Renato Augusto Ferreira De Lima, Nathan Swenson, Richard Condit, Jos Barlow, Ferry Slik, Manuel Hernández-Ruedas … & Felipe Melo
Aim: Here we examine the functional profile of regional tree species pools across the latitudinal distribution of Neotropical moist forests, and test trait-climate relationships among local communities. We expected opportunistic strategies (acquisitive traits, small seeds) to be overrepresented in species pools further from the equator due to long-term instability, but also in terms of abundance in local communities in currently wetter, warmer and more seasonal climates. Location: Neotropics. Time period: Recent. Major taxa studied: Trees....

Genomic changes underlying repeated niche shifts in an adaptive radiation

David A. Marques, Felicity C. Jones, Federica Di Palma, David M. Kingsley & Thomas E. Reimchen
In adaptive radiations, single lineages rapidly diversify by adapting to many new niches. Little is known yet about the genomic mechanisms involved, i.e. the source of genetic variation or genomic architecture facilitating or constraining adaptive radiation. Here, we investigate genomic changes associated with repeated invasion of many different freshwater niches by threespine stickleback in the Haida Gwaii archipelago, Canada, by re-sequencing single genomes from one marine and 28 freshwater populations. We find 89 likely targets...

Raw data for: Plastic responses of males and females interact to determine mating behaviour

Tracey Chapman
Individuals can respond plastically to variation in their social environment. However, each sex may respond to different cues and contrasting aspects of competition. Theory suggests that the plastic phenotype expressed by one sex can influence evolutionary dynamics in the other, and that plasticity simultaneously expressed by both sexes can exert sex-specific effects on fitness. However, data are needed to test this theory base. Here, we examined whether the simultaneous expression of adaptive plasticity by both...

Data from: Experimental evolution exposes female and male responses to sexual selection and conflict in Tribolium castaneum

Łukasz Michalczyk, Anna L. Millard, Oliver Y. Martin, Alyson J. Lumley, Brent C. Emerson & Matthew J. G. Gage
Between-individual variance in potential reproductive rate theoretically creates a load in reproducing populations by driving sexual selection of male traits for winning competitions, and female traits for resisting the costs of multiple mating. Here, using replicated experimental evolution under divergent operational sex ratios (OSR, 9:1 or 1:6 ?:?) we empirically identified the parallel reproductive fitness consequences for males and females in the promiscuous flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. Our results revealed clear evidence that sexual conflict...

Data from: Joint care can outweigh costs of nonkin competition in communal breeders

Kat Bebbington, Eleanor A. Fairfield, Lewis G. Spurgin, Sjouke Anne Kingma, Hannah Dugdale, Jan Komdeur & David S. Richardson
Competition between offspring can greatly influence offspring fitness and parental investment decisions, especially in communal breeders where unrelated competitors have less incentive to concede resources. Given the potential for escalated conflict, it remains unclear what mechanisms facilitate the evolution of communal breeding among unrelated females. Resolving this question requires simultaneous consideration of offspring in noncommunal and communal nurseries, but such comparisons are missing. In the Seychelles warbler Acrocephalus sechellensis, we compare nestling pairs from communal...

Data from: Revisiting niche fundamentals with Tukey depth

Jorge Orestes Cerdeira, Tiago Monteiro-Henriques, Maria João Martins, Pedro C. Silva, Diogo Alagador, Aldina M. A. Franco, Manuel L. Campagnolo, Pedro Arsénio, Francisca C. Aguiar & Mar Cabeza
The first attempts to describe species ecological niches were simple geometric procedures that depict the niche boundaries directly from environmental data. The convex hull was one of such procedures, popular for its simplicity, clear ecological rational and precise definition of the niche. However, it lacked the ability to differentiate areas of the niche with different probabilities of occurrence according to environmental suitability. We incorporate the Tukey depth, a mathematical tool to measure the centrality of...

Data from: Manipulation of feeding regime alters sexual dimorphism for lifespan and reduces sexual conflict in Drosophila melanogaster

Elizabeth M.L. Duxbury, Wayne G. Rostant, Tracey Chapman & Elizabeth M. L. Duxbury
Sexual dimorphism for lifespan (SDL) is widespread, but poorly understood. A leading hypothesis, which we test here, is that strong SDL can reduce sexual conflict by allowing each sex to maximize its sex-specific fitness. We used replicated experimental evolution lines of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, which had been maintained for over 360 generations on either unpredictable ‘Random’ or predictable ‘Regular’ feeding regimes. This evolutionary manipulation of feeding regime led to robust, enhanced SDL in...

Data from: Cryptic choice of conspecific sperm controlled by the impact of ovarian fluid on sperm swimming behaviour

Sarah Elizabeth Yeates, Sian Elizabeth Diamond, Sigurd Einum, Brent C. Emerson, William V. Holt & Matthew J. G. Gage
Despite evidence that variation in male-female reproductive compatibility exists in many fertilization systems, identifying mechanisms of cryptic female choice at the gamete level has been a challenge. Here, under risks of genetic incompatibility through hybridization, we show how salmon and trout eggs promote fertilization by conspecific sperm. Using in vitro fertilization experiments that replicate the gametic micro-environment, we find complete inter-fertility between both species. However, if either species’ ova were presented with equivalent numbers of...

Data from: Contrasting impacts of land use change on phylogenetic and functional diversity of tropical forest birds

Phillip M. Chapman, Joseph A. Tobias, David P. Edwards, Richard G. Davies & Philip M. Chapman
1.Biodiversity conservation strategies increasingly target maintaining evolutionary history and the resilience of ecosystem function, not just species richness (SR). This has led to the emergence of two metrics commonly proposed as tools for decision making: phylogenetic diversity (PD) and functional diversity (FD). Yet the extent to which they are interchangeable remains poorly understood. 2.We explore shifts in and relationships between FD and PD of bird communities across a disturbance gradient in Borneo, from old-growth tropical...

Data from: Costs and benefits of lifetime exposure to mating rivals in male Drosophila melanogaster

Amanda Bretman, James D. Westmancoat, Matthew J. G. Gage & Tracey Chapman
Theory predicts that males should evolve mechanisms to assess competition and allocate resources accordingly. This requires phenotypic plasticity, to accurately match responses to the environment. Plastic responses in males to sexual competition are diverse and widespread. However, our ability to understand and predict how they evolve is limited because their benefits are rarely measured, and costs are, as yet, entirely unquantified. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, males that anticipate strong competition for matings or...

Data from: Continental-scale patterns of pathogen prevalence: a case study on the corncrake

Yoan Fourcade, Oskars Keišs, David S. Richardson & Jean Secondi
Pathogen infections can represent a substantial threat to wild populations, especially those already limited in size. To determine how much variation in the pathogens observed among fragmented populations is caused by ecological factors, one needs to examine systems where host genetic diversity is consistent among the populations, thus controlling for any potentially confounding genetic effects. Here, we report geographic variation in haemosporidian infection among European populations of corncrake. This species now occurs in fragmented populations,...

Data from: Neutral variation does not predict immunogenetic variation in the European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) - implications for management

Jana Vanessa Huml, Martin I. Taylor, W. Edwin Harris, Robin Sen & Jonathan S. Ellis
Preservation of genetic diversity is critical to successful conservation and there is increasing demand for the inclusion of ecologically meaningful genetic information in management decisions. Supportive breeding programmes are increasingly implemented to combat declines in many species, yet their effect on adaptive genetic variation is understudied. This is despite the fact that supportive breeding may interfere with natural evolutionary processes. Here, we assessed the performance of neutral and adaptive markers (Major Histocompatibility Complex; MHC) to...

Data from: How much information is needed to infer reticulate evolutionary histories?

Katharina T. Huber, Leo Van Iersel, Vincent Moulton & Taoyang Wu
Phylogenetic networks are a generalization of evolutionary trees and are an important tool for analyzing reticulate evolutionary histories. Recently, there has been great interest in developing new methods to construct rooted phylogenetic networks, that is, networks whose internal vertices correspond to hypothetical ancestors, whose leaves correspond to sampled taxa, and in which vertices with more than one parent correspond to taxa formed by reticulate evolutionary events such as recombination or hybridization. Several methods for constructing...

Data from: Cryptic female choice favours sperm from MHC-dissimilar males

Hanne Løvlie, Mark A. F. Gillingham, Kirsty Worley, Tommaso Pizzari, David S. Richardson & H. Lovlie
Cryptic female choice may enable polyandrous females to avoid inbreeding or bias offspring variability at key loci after mating. However, the role of these genetic benefits in cryptic female choice remains poorly understood. Female red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, bias sperm use in favour of unrelated males. Here, we experimentally investigate whether this bias is driven by relatedness per se, or by similarity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), genes central to vertebrate acquired immunity, where...

Data from: Genomic associations with bill length and disease reveal drift and selection across island bird populations

Claire Armstrong, David S. Richardson, Helen Hipperson, Gavin J. Horsburgh, Clemens Kuepper, Lawrence Percival-Alwyn, Matt Clark, Terry Burke & Lewis G. Spurgin
Island species provide excellent models for investigating how selection and drift operate in wild populations, and for determining how these processes act to influence local adaptation and speciation. Here, we examine the role of selection and drift in shaping genomic and phenotypic variation across recently separated populations of Berthelot's pipit (Anthus berthelotii), a passerine bird endemic to three archipelagos in the Atlantic. We first characterised genetic diversity and population structuring, which supported previous inferences of...

Intrinsic post-ejaculation sperm ageing does not affect offspring fitness in Atlantic salmon

Simone Immler, Cosima Hotzy, Bao Xuhui & Tuuli Larva
Postmeiotic sperm ageing, both before and after ejaculation, has been shown to negatively affect offspring fitness by lowering the rate of embryonic development, reducing embryonic viability, and decreasing offspring condition. These negative effects are thought to be caused by intrinsic factors such as oxidative stress and ATP depletion or extrinsic factors such as temperature and osmosis. Effects of post-ejaculation sperm ageing on offspring fitness have so far almost exclusively been tested in internal fertilisers. Here,...

Brain size and life history variables in birds

Dante Jiménez-Ortega, Niclas Kolm, Simone Immler, Alexei A. Maklakov & Alejandro González-Voyer
The database contains information on brain size, body mass, life-history traits and development mode for a total of 620 bird species. The taxonomy follows Jetz et. al. (2012). For life-history the database includes information for the following six variables: clutch size, egg size, incubation period, fledging age, maximum longevity; as well as development mode (altricial, semialtricial, precocial and semiprecocial). Additionally, in most cases there is information about the origin or the sampled specimen (captivity vs...

Raw data for Leigh et al 2020: Satyrization in Drosophila fruiflies

Tracey Chapman
The satyr of Greek mythology was half-man, half-goat, with an animal persona signifying immoderate sexual appetites. In biology, satyrization is the disruption of reproduction in matings between closely-related species. Interestingly, its effects are often reciprocally asymmetric, manifesting more strongly in one direction of heterospecific mating than the other. Heterospecific matings are well known to result in female fitness costs due to the production of sterile or inviable hybrid offspring and can also occur due to...

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