176 Works

Data from: Age-dependent changes in infidelity in Seychelles warblers

Sara Raj Pant, Miartijn Hammers, Jan Komdeur, Terry Burke, Hannah Dugdale & David Richardson
Extra-pair paternity (EPP) is often linked to male age in socially monogamous vertebrates, i.e. older males are more likely to gain EPP and less likely to be cuckolded. However, whether this occurs because males improve at gaining paternity as they grow older, or because ‘higher quality’ males that live longer are preferred by females, has rarely been tested, despite being central to our understanding of the evolutionary drivers of female infidelity. Moreover, how extra-pair reproduction...

Data from: Environmental variation mediates the evolution of anticipatory parental effects

Martin Lind, Martyna Zwoinska, Johan Andersson, Hanne Carlsson, Therese Krieg, Tuuli Larva & Alexei Maklakov
Theory maintains that when future environment is predictable, parents should adjust the phenotype of their offspring to match the anticipated environment. The plausibility of positive anticipatory parental effects is hotly debated and the experimental evidence for the evolution of such effects is currently lacking. We experimentally investigated the evolution of anticipatory maternal effects in a range of environments that differ drastically in how predictable they are. Populations of the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei, adapted to 20°C,...

Data from: Contemporary evolution of the innate immune receptor gene TLR3 in an isolated vertebrate population

Charli Davies, Martin Taylor, Martijn Hammers, Terry Burke, Jan Komdeur, Hannah Dugdale & David Richardson
Understanding where genetic variation exists, and how it influences fitness within populations is important from an evolutionary and conservation perspective. Signatures of past selection suggest that pathogen-mediated balancing selection is a key driver of immunogenetic variation, but studies tracking contemporary evolution are needed to help resolve the evolutionary forces and mechanism at play. Previous work in a bottlenecked population of Seychelles warblers (Acrocephalus sechellensis) show that functional variation has been maintained at the viral-sensing Toll-like...

Causes and consequences of telomere lengthening in a wild vertebrate population

Thomas Brown, David Richardson, Lewis Spurgin, Hannah Dugdale, Jan Komdeur, Terry Burke & David Richardson
Telomeres have been advocated to be important markers of biological age in evolutionary and ecological studies. Telomeres usually shorten with age, and shortening is frequently associated with environmental stressors and increased subsequent mortality. Telomere lengthening – an apparent increase in telomere length between repeated samples from the same individual – also occurs. However, the exact circumstances, and consequences, of telomere lengthening are poorly understood. Using longitudinal data from the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis), we tested...

Individual repeatability of avian migration phenology: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Kirsty Franklin, Malcolm Nicoll, Simon Butler, Ken Norris, Norman Ratcliffe, Shinichi Nakagawa & Jennifer Gill
Changes in phenology and distribution are being widely reported for many migratory species in response to shifting environmental conditions. Understanding these changes and the situations in which they occur can be aided by understanding consistent individual differences in phenology and distribution and the situations in which consistency varies in strength or detectability. Studies tracking the same individuals over consecutive years are increasingly reporting migratory timings to be a repeatable trait, suggesting that flexible individual responses...

Genomic associations with poxvirus across divergent island populations in Berthelot’s pipit

Eleanor C. Sheppard, Claudia A. Martin, Claire Armstrong, Catalina González-Quevedo, Juan Carlos Illera, Alexander Suh, Lewis G. Spurgin & David S. Richardson
Understanding the mechanisms and genes that enable animal populations to adapt to pathogens is important from an evolutionary, health and conservation perspective. Berthelot’s pipit (Anthus berthelotii) experiences extensive and consistent spatial heterogeneity in avian pox infection pressure across its range of island populations, thus providing an excellent system with which to examine how pathogen-mediated selection drives spatial variation in immunogenetic diversity. Here we test for evidence of genetic variation associated with avian pox at both...

International Bottom Trawl Survey Jellyfish Data - North Sea - 2012 to 2018

The wet weight in grams of gelatinous zooplankton (jellyfish) caught at each station during International Bottom Trawl Surveys in the North Sea from 2012 to 2018. Also included are associated station data which include datetime, location, depths, swept volume and information on gear deployment. Any blank values indicate the value was not recorded. Jellyfish data were collected using standard GOV fishing gear deployed from Cefas RV Endeavour, to carry out the International Bottom Trawl Survey...

Family lineage and landscape quality data for wild bumblebee colonies across an agricultural landscape in Buckinghamshire, U.K.

C. Carvell, A.F.G. Bourke, S. Dreier, S.N. Freeman, S. Hulmes, W.C. Jordan, J.W. Redhead, J. Wang, S. Sumner & M.S. Heard
Family lineage relationships between spring queens, daughter workers and sister queens of three bumblebee species (Bombus terrestris, B. lapidarius and B. pascuorum) collected across the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK, between spring 2011 and spring 2012. A combination of land-use and habitat surveys, molecular genetics and spatial modelling was used to estimate the locations of wild colonies represented by greater than 1 worker and to calculate the proportions of cover represented by different habitat quality and...

Microsatellite genotype data for five species of bumblebee across an agricultural landscape in Buckinghamshire, UK

S. Dreier, J.W. Redhead, I. Warren, A.F.G. Bourke, M.S. Heard, W.C. Jordan, S. Sumner, J. Wang & C. Carvell
Microsatellite data for five species of common and declining bumblebee (Bombus terrestris, B. lapidarius, B. pascuorum, B. hortorum and B. ruderatus) collected across the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK, in summer 2011. Worker genotypes were determined from individuals sampled across an agricultural landscape and queen genotypes were reconstructed from sampled worker offspring. Data were collected as part of a project led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, funded under the Insect Pollinators Initiative.

Eddy covariance flux measurements during Arctic cruises JR18006 and JR18007 in summer 2019

Thomas G Bell, Mingxi Yang & Yuanxu Dong
This is the high frequency (10 Hz) eddy covariance (EC) measurements which mainly contain the wind data, ship motion data, gas concentration data and the underway measurements. These data were measured on summer 2019 during two Arctic cruises JR18006 (from and to Aberdeen, UK and visited the Barents Sea ) and JR18007 (from Harwich, UK to Svalbard and visited the Greenland Sea). These EC data can be used to directly calculate the air-sea CO2 and...

Genetic and thermal variation influences adaptation to fluctuating temperature in the seed beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus

Edward Ivimey-Cook, Claudio Piani, Wei-Tse Hung & Elena Berg
The impacts of climate change on biological systems are notoriously difficult to measure, and laboratory studies often do not realistically represent natural fluctuations in environmental conditions. To date, most experimental studies of thermal adaptation test populations at constant temperatures, or they make incremental changes to an otherwise constant mean background state. To address this, we examined the long-term effects of stressful fluctuating daily temperature on several key life history traits in two laboratory populations of...

Ladybird beetles' life history traits

Jean Louis RGM Hemptinne, Emilie Lecompte, Arnaud Sentis, Anthony F. G. Dixon & Alexandra Magro
1. The balance between risk and benefit of exploiting resources drives life history evolution in organisms. Predators are naturally recognized as major drivers of the life history evolution of their prey. Although prey may also influence the life history evolution of their predators in the context of an evolutionary arms race, there is far more evidence of the role of predators than of prey. 2. The goal of this study was to investigate the role...

Data from: Control of seminal fluid protein expression via regulatory hubs in D. melanogaster

Irina Mohorianu, Emily K. Fowler, Tamas Dalmay & Tracey Chapman
Highly precise, yet flexible and responsive co-ordination of expression across groups of genes underpins the integrity of many vital functions. However, our understanding of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is often hampered by the lack of experimentally tractable systems, by significant computational challenges derived from the large number of genes involved or from difficulties in the accurate identification and characterization of gene interactions. Here we used a tractable experimental system in which to study GRNs: the...

Data from: Delayed dispersal and the costs and benefits of different routes to independent breeding in a cooperatively breeding bird

Sjouke A. Kingma, Kat Bebbington, Martijn Hammers, David S. Richardson & Jan Komdeur
Why sexually mature individuals stay in groups as nonreproductive subordinates is central to the evolution of sociality and cooperative breeding. To understand such delayed dispersal, its costs and benefits need to be compared with those of permanently leaving to float through the population. However, comprehensive comparisons, especially regarding differences in future breeding opportunities, are rare. Moreover, extraterritorial prospecting by philopatric individuals has generally been ignored, even though the factors underlying this route to independent breeding...

Data from: Oxidative status and fitness components in the Seychelles warbler

Janske Van De Crommenacker, Martijn Hammers, Jildou Van Der Woude, Marina Louter, Peter Santema, David S. Richardson & Jan Komdeur
Oxidative damage, caused by reactive oxygen species during aerobic respiration, is thought to be an important mediator of life-history trade-offs. To mitigate oxidative damage, antioxidant defence mechanisms are deployed, often at the cost of resource allocation to other body functions. Both reduced resource allocation to body functions and direct oxidative damage may decrease individual fitness, through reducing survival and/or reproductive output. The oxidative costs of reproduction have gained much attention recently, but few studies have...

Data from: Contribution of maternal effects to dietary selection in Mediterranean fruit flies.

Philip T. Leftwich, William J. Nash, Lucy A. Friend & Tracey Chapman
Individual responses to dietary variation represent a fundamental component of fitness, and nutritional adaptation can occur over just a few generations. Maternal effects can show marked proximate responses to nutrition, but whether they contribute to longer-term dietary adaptation is unclear. Here we tested the hypotheses that maternal effects: (i) contribute to dietary adaptation, (ii) diminish when dietary conditions are constant between generations, (iii) are trait-specific and (iv) interact with high- and low-quality food. We used...

Data from: The impact of translocations on neutral and functional genetic diversity within and among populations of the Seychelles warbler

David J. Wright, Lewis G. Spurgin, Nigel J. Collar, Jan Komdeur, Terry Burke & David S. Richardson
Translocations are an increasingly common tool in conservation. The maintenance of genetic diversity through translocation is critical for both the short and long term persistence of populations and species. However, the relative spatio-temporal impacts of translocations on neutral and functional genetic diversity and how this affects genetic structure among the conserved populations overall has received little investigation. We compared the impact of translocating different numbers of founders on both microsatellite and major histocompatibility complex (MHC)...

Data from: How quantitative is metabarcoding: a meta-analytical approach

Philip D. Lamb, Ewan Hunter, John K. Pinnegar, Simon Creer, Richard G. Davies & Martin I. Taylor
Metabarcoding has been used in a range of ecological applications such as taxonomic assignment, dietary analysis, and the analysis of environmental DNA. However, after a decade of use in these applications there is little consensus on the extent to which proportions of reads generated corresponds to the original proportions of species in a community. To quantify our current understanding we conducted a structured review and meta-analysis. The analysis suggests that a weak quantitative relationship may...

Data from: A further cost for the sicker sex? Evidence for male-biased parasite-induced vulnerability to predation

Jessica F. Stephenson, Cormac Kinsella, Joanne Cable & Cock Van Oosterhout
Males are typically the sicker sex. Data from multiple taxa indicate that they are more likely to be infected with parasites, and are less “tolerant,” or less able to mitigate the fitness costs of a given infection, than females. One cost of infection for many animals is an increased probability of being captured by a predator. A clear, hitherto untested, prediction is therefore that this parasite-induced vulnerability to predation is more pronounced among males than...

Data from: FlatNJ: a novel network-based approach to visualize evolutionary and biogeographical relationships

Monika Balvočūtė, Andreas Spillner & Vincent Moulton
Split networks are a type of phylogenetic network that allow visualization of conflict in evolutionary data. We present a new method for constructing such networks called FlatNetJoining (FlatNJ). A key feature of FlatNJ is that it produces networks that can be drawn in the plane in which labels may appear inside of the network. For complex data sets that involve, for example, non-neutral molecular markers, this can allow additional detail to be visualized as compared...

Data from: Evolution of ageing, costs of reproduction and the fecundity–longevity trade-off in eusocial insects

Pierre Blacher, Timothy J. Huggins, Andrew F.G. Bourke & Andrew F. G. Bourke
Eusocial insects provide special opportunities to elucidate the evolution of ageing as queens have apparently evaded costs of reproduction and reversed the fecundity-longevity trade-off generally observed in non-social organisms. But how reproduction affects longevity in eusocial insects has rarely been tested experimentally. In this study, we took advantage of the reproductive plasticity of workers to test the causal role of reproduction in determining longevity in eusocial insects. Using the eusocial bumblebee Bombus terrestris, we found...

Data from: Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene sequence variation and melanism in the gray (Sciurus carolinensis), fox (Sciurus niger) and red (Sciurus vulgaris) squirrel

Helen R. McRobie, Linda M. King, Cristina Fanutti, Peter J. Coussons, Nancy D. Montcrief & Alison P. M. Thomas
Sequence variations in the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene are associated with melanism in many different species of mammals, birds, and reptiles. The gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), found in the British Isles, was introduced from North America in the late 19th century. Melanism in the British gray squirrel is associated with a 24-bp deletion in the MC1R. To investigate the origin of this mutation, we sequenced the MC1R of 95 individuals including 44 melanic gray...

Data from: Molecular characterisation of trophic ecology within an island radiation of insect herbivores (Curculionidae: Entiminae: Cratopus).

James J. N. Kitson, Ben H. Warren, F. B. Vincent Florens, Claudia Baider, Dominique Strasberg & Brent C. Emerson
The phytophagous beetle family Curculionidae is the most species-rich insect family known, with much of this diversity having been attributed to both co-evolution with food plants and host-shifts at key points within the early evolutionary history of the group. Less well understood is the extent to which patterns of host use vary within or among related species, largely because of the technical difficulties associated with quantifying this. Here we develop a recently characterised molecular approach...

Data from: Plasticity in growth of farmed and wild Atlantic salmon: is the increased growth rate of farmed salmon caused by evolutionary adaptations to the commercial diet?

Alison C. Harvey, Monica F. Solberg, Eva Troianou, Gary R. Carvalho, Martin I. Taylor, Simon Creer, Lise Dyrhovden, Ivar Helge Matre & Kevin A. Glover
Background: Domestication of Atlantic salmon for commercial aquaculture has resulted in farmed salmon displaying substantially higher growth rates than wild salmon under farming conditions. In contrast, growth differences between farmed and wild salmon are much smaller when compared in the wild. The mechanisms underlying this contrast between environments remain largely unknown. It is possible that farmed salmon have adapted to the high-energy pellets developed specifically for aquaculture, contributing to inflated growth differences when fed on...

Data from: Moving from frugivory to seed dispersal: incorporating the functional outcomes of interactions in plant-frugivore networks

Benno I. Simmons, William J. Sutherland, Lynn V. Dicks, Jörg Albrecht, Nina Farwig, Daniel Garcia, Pedro Jordano & Juan P. González-Varo
1.There is growing interest in understanding the functional outcomes of species interactions in ecological networks. For many mutualistic networks, including pollination and seed dispersal networks, interactions are generally sampled by recording animal foraging visits to plants. However, these visits may not reflect actual pollination or seed dispersal events, despite these typically being the ecological processes of interest. 2.Frugivorous animals can act as seed dispersers, by swallowing entire fruits and dispersing their seeds, or as pulp...

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