14 Works

Geographic distances between pairs of wild bumblebee colonies across an agricultural landscape in Buckinghamshire, UK

S. Dreier, J.W. Redhead, I. Warren, A.F.G. Bourke, M.S. Heard, W.C. Jordan, S. Sumner, J. Wang & C. Carvell
Geographic distances between pairs of wild bumblebee colonies across an agricultural landscape centred on the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Colony locations were estimated using the foraging locations of workers sampled in summer 2011, genotyped and grouped into full-sib families. The spatial structure of five Bombus species (Bombus terrestris, B. lapidarius, B. pascuorum, B. hortorum and B. ruderatus) was determined, with inter-colony distances varying from 7 to 5264 metres. Data were collected as part of a...

Data from: Continental-scale patterns of pathogen prevalence: a case study on the corncrake

Yoan Fourcade, Oskars Keišs, David S. Richardson & Jean Secondi
Pathogen infections can represent a substantial threat to wild populations, especially those already limited in size. To determine how much variation in the pathogens observed among fragmented populations is caused by ecological factors, one needs to examine systems where host genetic diversity is consistent among the populations, thus controlling for any potentially confounding genetic effects. Here, we report geographic variation in haemosporidian infection among European populations of corncrake. This species now occurs in fragmented populations,...

Data from: How much information is needed to infer reticulate evolutionary histories?

Katharina T. Huber, Leo Van Iersel, Vincent Moulton & Taoyang Wu
Phylogenetic networks are a generalization of evolutionary trees and are an important tool for analyzing reticulate evolutionary histories. Recently, there has been great interest in developing new methods to construct rooted phylogenetic networks, that is, networks whose internal vertices correspond to hypothetical ancestors, whose leaves correspond to sampled taxa, and in which vertices with more than one parent correspond to taxa formed by reticulate evolutionary events such as recombination or hybridization. Several methods for constructing...

Data from: Wolbachia effects in natural populations of Chorthippus parallelus from the Pyrenean hybrid zone.

Jose L. Bella, Godfrey M. Hewitt, Mario Zabal-Aguirre, Francisca Arroyo, Javier Garcia-Hurtado & Joaquina De La Torre
We evaluate for the first time the effect of Wolbachia infection, involving two different supergoups, on the structure and dynamics of the hybrid zone between two subspecies of Chorthippus parallelus (Orthoptera) in the Pyrenees. Wolbachia infection showed no effects on female fecundity or a slight increment in females infected by F supergroup although in the last case it has to be well-established. Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is confirmed in crosses carried out in the field between...

Data from: Assessing risks of invasion through gamete performance: farm Atlantic salmon sperm and eggs show equivalence in function, fertility, compatibility and competitiveness to wild Atlantic salmon

Sarah E. Yeates, Sigurd Einum, William V. Holt, Ian A. Fleming & Matthew J. G. Gage
Adaptations at the gamete level (a) evolve quickly, (b) appear sensitive to inbreeding and outbreeding and (c) have important influences on potential to reproduce. We apply this understanding to problems posed by escaped farm salmon and measure their potential to reproduce in the wild. Farm Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) are a threat to biodiversity, because they escape in large numbers and can introgress, dilute or disrupt locally adapted wild gene pools. Experiments at the whole...

Location data of worker bumblebees across an agricultural landscape in Buckinghamshire, UK

C. Carvell, A.F.G. Bourke, S. Dreier, M.S. Heard, W.C. Jordan, S. Sumner, J. Wang & J.W. Redhead
This dataset contains locations of worker bumblebees of five species (Bombus terrestris, B. lapidarius, B. pascuorum, B. hortorum, B. ruderatus) across an agricultural landscape centred on the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Locations were recorded in the field using a handheld GPS unit. Workers were non-lethally DNA sampled between June and August 2011, and genetic analysis used to confirm species and assign individuals to full-sib groups (colonies). Data were collected as part of a project led...

Data from: Museum DNA reveals the demographic history of the endangered Seychelles warbler

Lewis G. Spurgin, David J. Wright, Nigel J. Collar, Marco Van Der Velde, Jan Komdeur, Terry Burke & David S. Richardson
The importance of evolutionary conservation – how understanding evolutionary forces can help guide conservation decisions – is widely recognized. However, the historical demography of many endangered species is unknown, despite the fact that this can have important implications for contemporary ecological processes and for extinction risk. Here, we reconstruct the population history of the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis) – an ecological model species. By the 1960s, this species was on the brink of extinction, but...

Data from: RAD sequencing, genotyping error estimation and de novo assembly optimization for population genetic inference

Alicia Mastretta-Yanes, Nils Arrigo, Nadir Alvarez, Tove H. Jorgensen, Daniel Piñero & Brent C. Emerson
Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) provides researchers with the ability to record genetic polymorphism across thousands of loci for non-model organisms, potentially revolutionising the field of molecular ecology. However, as with other genotyping methods, RADseq is prone to a number of sources of error that may have consequential effects for population genetic inferences, and these have received only limited attention in terms of the estimation and reporting of genotyping error rates. Here we use individual...

Data from: Sexual conflict and interacting phenotypes: a quantitative genetic analysis of fecundity and copula duration in Drosophila melanogaster

Dominic Alexander Edward, Jocelyn Poissant, Alastair J. Wilson & Tracey Chapman
Many reproductive traits that have evolved under sexual conflict may be influenced by both sexes. Investigation of the genetic architecture of such traits can yield important insight into their evolution, but this entails that the heritable component of variation is estimated for males and females – as an interacting phenotype. We address the lack of research in this area through an investigation of egg production and copula duration in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Despite...

Data from: Genetic elimination of field-cage populations of Mediterranean fruit flies

Philip T. Leftwich, Martha Koukidou, Polychronis Rempoulakis, Hong-Fei Gong, Antigoni Zacharapolou, Tracey Chapman, Aris Economopolous, John Vontas, Luke Alphey, A. Economopoulos & A. Zacharopoulou
The Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly, Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann) is a pest of over 300 fruits, vegetables and nuts. The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a control measure used to reduce the reproductive potential of populations through the mass release of sterilized male insects that mate with wild females. However, SIT flies can display poor field performance, due to the effects of mass-rearing and of the irradiation process used for sterilization. The development of female-lethal RIDL...

Data from: Genetic and phenotypic divergence in an island bird: isolation by distance, by colonisation or by adaptation?

Lewis G. Spurgin, Juan Carlos Illera, Tove H. Jorgensen, Deborah A. Dawson & David S. Richardson
Discerning the relative roles of adaptive and non-adaptive processes in generating differences among populations and species, as well as how these processes interact, are fundamental aims in biology. Both genetic and phenotypic divergence across populations can be the product of limited dispersal and gradual genetic drift across populations (isolation by distance), of colonisation history and founder effects (isolation by colonisation) or of adaptation to different environments preventing migration between populations (isolation by adaptation). Here we...

Microsatellite genotype data for five species of bumblebee across an agricultural landscape in Buckinghamshire, UK

S. Dreier, J.W. Redhead, I. Warren, A.F.G. Bourke, M.S. Heard, W.C. Jordan, S. Sumner, J. Wang & C. Carvell
Microsatellite data for five species of common and declining bumblebee (Bombus terrestris, B. lapidarius, B. pascuorum, B. hortorum and B. ruderatus) collected across the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK, in summer 2011. Worker genotypes were determined from individuals sampled across an agricultural landscape and queen genotypes were reconstructed from sampled worker offspring. Data were collected as part of a project led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, funded under the Insect Pollinators Initiative.

Data from: Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene sequence variation and melanism in the gray (Sciurus carolinensis), fox (Sciurus niger) and red (Sciurus vulgaris) squirrel

Helen R. McRobie, Linda M. King, Cristina Fanutti, Peter J. Coussons, Nancy D. Montcrief & Alison P. M. Thomas
Sequence variations in the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene are associated with melanism in many different species of mammals, birds, and reptiles. The gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), found in the British Isles, was introduced from North America in the late 19th century. Melanism in the British gray squirrel is associated with a 24-bp deletion in the MC1R. To investigate the origin of this mutation, we sequenced the MC1R of 95 individuals including 44 melanic gray...

Data from: The impact of translocations on neutral and functional genetic diversity within and among populations of the Seychelles warbler

David J. Wright, Lewis G. Spurgin, Nigel J. Collar, Jan Komdeur, Terry Burke & David S. Richardson
Translocations are an increasingly common tool in conservation. The maintenance of genetic diversity through translocation is critical for both the short and long term persistence of populations and species. However, the relative spatio-temporal impacts of translocations on neutral and functional genetic diversity and how this affects genetic structure among the conserved populations overall has received little investigation. We compared the impact of translocating different numbers of founders on both microsatellite and major histocompatibility complex (MHC)...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of East Anglia
    14
  • University of Sheffield
    5
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    3
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    3
  • University of Groningen
    3
  • Institute of Zoology
    3
  • Anglia Ruskin University
    1
  • University of Crete
    1
  • University of Patras
    1
  • University of Lausanne
    1