18 Works

Data from: Does density influence relative growth performance of farm, wild, and F1 hybrid Atlantic salmon in semi-natural and hatchery common garden conditions?

Alison C. Harvey, Gareth Juleff, Gary R. Carvalho, Martin I. Taylor, Monica F. Solberg, Simon Creer, Lise Dyrhovden, Ivar-Helge Matre & Kevin A. Glover
The conditions encountered by Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., in aquaculture are markedly different from the natural environment. Typically, farmed salmon experience much higher densities than wild individuals, and may therefore have adapted to living in high densities. Previous studies have demonstrated that farmed salmon typically outgrow wild salmon by large ratios in the hatchery, but these differences are much less pronounced in the wild. Such divergence in growth may be explained partly by the...

Data from: Resource limitation and responses to rivals in males of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster

Janet S. Mason, Wayne G. Rostant & Tracey Chapman
Diet has a profound direct and indirect effect on reproductive success in both sexes. Variation in diet quality and quantity can significantly alter the capacity of females to lay eggs and of males to deliver courtship. Here, we tested the effect of dietary resource limitation on the ability of male Drosophila melanogaster to respond adaptively to rivals by extending their mating duration. Previous work carried out under ad libitum diet conditions showed that males exposed...

Data from: The cost of prospecting for dispersal opportunities in a social bird

Sjouke A. Kingma, Jan Komdeur, Martijn Hammers & David S. Richardson
Understanding why individuals delay dispersal and become subordinates within a group is central to studying the evolution of sociality. Hypotheses predict that dispersal decisions are influenced by costs of extra-territorial prospecting that are often required to find a breeding vacancy. Little is known about such costs, partly because it is complicated to demonstrate them empirically. For example, prospecting individuals may be of inferior quality already before prospecting and/or have been evicted. Moreover, costs of prospecting...

Data from: Quantifying uncertainty of taxonomic placement in DNA barcoding and metabarcoding

Panu Somervuo, Douglas W. Yu, Charles C.Y. Xu, YinQiu Ji, Jenni Hultman, Helena Wirta & Otso Ovaskainen
A crucial step in the use of DNA markers for biodiversity surveys is the assignment of Linnaean taxonomies (species, genus, etc.) to sequence reads. This allows the use of all the information known based on the taxonomic names. Taxonomic placement of DNA barcoding sequences is inherently probabilistic because DNA sequences contain errors, because there is natural variation among sequences within a species, and because reference data bases are incomplete and can have false annotations. However,...

Data from: Low migratory connectivity is common in long-distance migrant birds

Tom Finch, Simon Butler, Aldina Franco, Will Cresswell, Simon J. Butler & Aldina M. A. Franco
1. Estimating how much long-distance migrant populations spread out and mix during the non-breeding season (migratory connectivity) is essential for understanding and predicting population dynamics in the face of global change. 2. We quantify variation in population spread and inter-population mixing in long-distance, terrestrial migrant land-bird populations (712 individuals from 98 populations of 45 species, from tagging studies in the Neotropic and Afro-Palearctic flyways). We evaluate the Mantel test as a metric of migratory connectivity,...

Data from: Winter wren populations show adaptation to local climate

Catriona A. Morrison, Robert A. Robinson & James W. Pearce-Higgins
Most studies of evolutionary responses to climate change have focused on phenological responses to warming, and provide only weak evidence for evolutionary adaptation. This could be because phenological changes are more weakly linked to fitness than more direct mechanisms of climate change impacts, such as selective mortality during extreme weather events which have immediate fitness consequences for the individuals involved. Studies examining these other mechanisms may be more likely to show evidence for evolutionary adaptation....

Data from: Telomere length reveals cumulative individual and transgenerational inbreeding effects in a passerine bird

Kat Bebbington, Lewis G. Spurgin, Eleanor A. Fairfield, Hannah L. Dugdale, Jan Komdeur, Terry Burke & David S. Richardson
Inbreeding results in more homozygous offspring that should suffer reduced fitness, but it can be difficult to quantify these costs for several reasons. First, inbreeding depression may vary with ecological or physiological stress and only be detectable over long time periods. Second, parental homozygosity may indirectly affect offspring fitness, thus confounding analyses that consider offspring homozygosity alone. Finally, measurement of inbreeding coefficients, survival and reproductive success may often be too crude to detect inbreeding costs...

Data from: Post-copulatory opportunities for sperm competition and cryptic female choice provide no offspring fitness benefits in externally fertilizing salmon

Alyson J. Lumley, Sian E. Diamond, Sigurd Einum, Sarah E. Yeates, Danielle Peruffo, Brent C. Emerson & Matthew JG Gage
There is increasing evidence that females can somehow improve their offspring fitness by mating with multiple males, but we understand little about the exact stage(s) at which such benefits are gained. Here, we measure whether offspring fitness is influenced by mechanisms operating solely between sperm and egg. Using externally fertilizing and polyandrous Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), we employed split-clutch and split-ejaculate in vitro fertilization experiments to generate offspring using designs that either denied or applied...

Data from: The contrasting role of male relatedness in different mechanisms of sexual selection in red junglefowl

Cedric Tan Kai Wei, Philippa Doyle, Emma Bagshaw, David S. Richardson, Stuart L. Wigby, Tom Pizzari, Cedric Kai Wei Tan, Stuart Wigby & Tommaso Pizzari
In structured populations, competition for reproductive opportunities should be relaxed among related males. The few tests of this prediction often neglect the fact that sexual selection acts through multiple mechanisms, both before and after mating. We performed experiments to study the role of within-group male relatedness across pre- and postcopulatory mechanisms of sexual selection in social groups of red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, in which two related males and one unrelated male competed over females unrelated...

Data from: Adaptation to divergent larval diets in the medfly, Ceratitis capitata

Philip T. Leftwich, William J. Nash, Lucy A. Friend & Tracey Chapman
Variation in diet can influence the timing of major life history events and can drive population diversification and ultimately speciation. Proximate responses of life histories to diet have been well studied. However, there are scant experimental data on how organisms adapt to divergent diets over the longer term. We focused on this omission by testing the responses of a global pest, the Mediterranean fruitfly, to divergent selection on larval diets of different nutritional profiles. Tests...

Data from: Plant diversity accurately predicts insect diversity in two tropical landscapes

Kai Zhang, Siliang Lin, Yinqiu Ji, Chenxue Yang, Xiaoyang Wang, Chunyan Yang, Hesheng Wang, Haisheng Jiang, Rhett D. Harrison & Douglas W. Yu
Plant diversity surely determines arthropod diversity, but only moderate correlations between arthropod and plant species richness had been observed until Basset et al. (Science, 338, 2012 and 1481) finally undertook an unprecedentedly comprehensive sampling of a tropical forest and demonstrated that plant species richness could indeed accurately predict arthropod species richness. We now require a high-throughput pipeline to operationalize this result so that we can (i) test competing explanations for tropical arthropod megadiversity, (ii) improve...

Family lineage and landscape quality data for wild bumblebee colonies across an agricultural landscape in Buckinghamshire, U.K.

C. Carvell, A.F.G. Bourke, S. Dreier, S.N. Freeman, S. Hulmes, W.C. Jordan, J.W. Redhead, J. Wang, S. Sumner & M.S. Heard
Family lineage relationships between spring queens, daughter workers and sister queens of three bumblebee species (Bombus terrestris, B. lapidarius and B. pascuorum) collected across the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK, between spring 2011 and spring 2012. A combination of land-use and habitat surveys, molecular genetics and spatial modelling was used to estimate the locations of wild colonies represented by greater than 1 worker and to calculate the proportions of cover represented by different habitat quality and...

Data from: Landscape-scale variation in an anthropogenic factor shapes immune gene variation within a wild population

Catalina Gonzalez-Quevedo, Richard G. Davies, Karl P. Phillips, Lewis G. Spurgin, David S. Ricardson & David S. Richardson
Understanding the spatial scale at which selection acts upon adaptive genetic variation in natural populations is fundamental to our understanding of evolutionary ecology, and has important ramifications for conservation. The environmental factors to which individuals of a population are exposed can vary at fine spatial scales, potentially generating localized patterns of adaptation. Here, we compared patterns of neutral and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) variation within an island population of Berthelot's pipit (Anthus berthelotii) to assess...

Data from: Plasticity in growth of farmed and wild Atlantic salmon: is the increased growth rate of farmed salmon caused by evolutionary adaptations to the commercial diet?

Alison C. Harvey, Monica F. Solberg, Eva Troianou, Gary R. Carvalho, Martin I. Taylor, Simon Creer, Lise Dyrhovden, Ivar Helge Matre & Kevin A. Glover
Background: Domestication of Atlantic salmon for commercial aquaculture has resulted in farmed salmon displaying substantially higher growth rates than wild salmon under farming conditions. In contrast, growth differences between farmed and wild salmon are much smaller when compared in the wild. The mechanisms underlying this contrast between environments remain largely unknown. It is possible that farmed salmon have adapted to the high-energy pellets developed specifically for aquaculture, contributing to inflated growth differences when fed on...

Data from: Delayed dispersal and the costs and benefits of different routes to independent breeding in a cooperatively breeding bird

Sjouke A. Kingma, Kat Bebbington, Martijn Hammers, David S. Richardson & Jan Komdeur
Why sexually mature individuals stay in groups as nonreproductive subordinates is central to the evolution of sociality and cooperative breeding. To understand such delayed dispersal, its costs and benefits need to be compared with those of permanently leaving to float through the population. However, comprehensive comparisons, especially regarding differences in future breeding opportunities, are rare. Moreover, extraterritorial prospecting by philopatric individuals has generally been ignored, even though the factors underlying this route to independent breeding...

Data from: A further cost for the sicker sex? Evidence for male-biased parasite-induced vulnerability to predation

Jessica F. Stephenson, Cormac Kinsella, Joanne Cable & Cock Van Oosterhout
Males are typically the sicker sex. Data from multiple taxa indicate that they are more likely to be infected with parasites, and are less “tolerant,” or less able to mitigate the fitness costs of a given infection, than females. One cost of infection for many animals is an increased probability of being captured by a predator. A clear, hitherto untested, prediction is therefore that this parasite-induced vulnerability to predation is more pronounced among males than...

Data from: A combined field survey and molecular identification protocol for comparing forest arthropod biodiversity across spatial scales

Brent C. Emerson, Juliane Casquet, Heriberto López, Pedro Cardoso, Paulo A. V. Borges, Noémy Mollaret, Pedro Oromí, Dominique Strasberg & Christophe Thébaud
Obtaining fundamental biodiversity metrics such as alpha, beta and gamma diversity for arthropods is often complicated by a lack of prior taxonomic information and/or taxonomic expertise, which can result in unreliable morphologically based estimates. We provide a set of standardized ecological and molecular sampling protocols that can be employed by researchers whose taxonomic skills may be limited, and where there may be a lack of robust a priori information regarding the regional pool of species....

Data from: Adaptive phenotypic response to climate enabled by epigenetics in a K-strategy species, the fish Leucoraja ocellata (Rajidae)

Jackie Lighten, Danny Incarnato, Ben J. Ward, Cock Van Oosterhout, Ian Bradbury, Mark Hanson & Paul Bentzen
The relative importance of genetic versus epigenetic changes in adaptive evolution is a hotly debated topic, with studies showing that some species appear to be able to adapt rapidly without significant genetic change. Epigenetic mechanisms may be particularly important for the evolutionary potential of species with long maturation times and low reproductive potential (‘K-strategists’), particularly when faced with rapidly changing environmental conditions. Here we study the transcriptome of two populations of the winter skate (Leucoraja...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    18

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    18

Affiliations

  • University of East Anglia
    18
  • University of Groningen
    4
  • Bangor University
    2
  • Kunming Institute of Zoology
    2
  • University of Helsinki
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2
  • Norwegian Institute of Marine Research
    2
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    2
  • University of La Réunion
    1
  • Norwich Research Park
    1