22 Works

Data from: Queen longevity and fecundity affect conflict with workers over resource inheritance in a social insect

Edward J. Almond, Timothy J. Huggins, Liam P. Crowther, Joel D. Parker & Andrew F. G. Bourke
Resource inheritance is a major source of conflict in animal societies. However, the assumptions and predictions of models of conflict over resource inheritance have not been systematically tested within a single system. We developed an inclusive fitness model for annual eusocial Hymenoptera that predicts a zone of conflict in which future reproductive workers are selected to enforce nest inheritance before the queen is selected to cede the nest. We experimentally tested key elements of this...

Data from: Lineages evolved under stronger sexual selection show superior ability to invade conspecific competitor populations

Joanne L. Godwin, Lewis G. Spurgin, L. Michalczyk, Oliver Y. Martin, Alyson J. Lumley, Tracey Chapman & Matthew J.G. Gage
Despite limitations on offspring production, almost all multicellular species use sex to reproduce. Sex gives rise to sexual selection, a widespread force operating through competition and choice within reproduction, however, it remains unclear whether sexual selection is beneficial for total lineage fitness, or if it acts as a constraint. Sexual selection could be a positive force because of selection on improved individual condition and purging of mutation load, summing into lineages with superior fitness. On...

Data from: Assessing bottom-trawling impacts based on the longevity of benthic invertebrates

Jan Geert Hiddink, Simon Jennings, Marija Sciberras, Stefan Bolam, Giulia Cambie, Robert McConnaughey, Tessa Mazor, Ray Hilborn, Jeremy Collie, C. Roland Pitcher, Ana Parma, Petri Suuronen, Michel Kaiser, Adriaan Rijnsdorp, Jeremy S. Collie, Michel J. Kaiser, Adriaan D. Rijnsdorp & Robert A. McConnaughey
1. Bottom trawling is the most widespread human activity directly affecting seabed habitats. Assessment and effective management of the effects of bottom trawling at the scale of fisheries requires an understanding of differences in sensitivity of biota to trawling. Responses to disturbance are expected to depend on the intrinsic rate of increase of populations (r), which is expected to be linearly related to the reciprocal of longevity. 2. We examine the relationship between the longevity...

Data from: Revisiting niche fundamentals with Tukey depth

Jorge Orestes Cerdeira, Tiago Monteiro-Henriques, Maria João Martins, Pedro C. Silva, Diogo Alagador, Aldina M. A. Franco, Manuel L. Campagnolo, Pedro Arsénio, Francisca C. Aguiar & Mar Cabeza
The first attempts to describe species ecological niches were simple geometric procedures that depict the niche boundaries directly from environmental data. The convex hull was one of such procedures, popular for its simplicity, clear ecological rational and precise definition of the niche. However, it lacked the ability to differentiate areas of the niche with different probabilities of occurrence according to environmental suitability. We incorporate the Tukey depth, a mathematical tool to measure the centrality of...

Data from: Neutral variation does not predict immunogenetic variation in the European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) - implications for management

Jana Vanessa Huml, Martin I. Taylor, W. Edwin Harris, Robin Sen & Jonathan S. Ellis
Preservation of genetic diversity is critical to successful conservation and there is increasing demand for the inclusion of ecologically meaningful genetic information in management decisions. Supportive breeding programmes are increasingly implemented to combat declines in many species, yet their effect on adaptive genetic variation is understudied. This is despite the fact that supportive breeding may interfere with natural evolutionary processes. Here, we assessed the performance of neutral and adaptive markers (Major Histocompatibility Complex; MHC) to...

Data from: Genomic associations with bill length and disease reveal drift and selection across island bird populations

Claire Armstrong, David S. Richardson, Helen Hipperson, Gavin J. Horsburgh, Clemens Kuepper, Lawrence Percival-Alwyn, Matt Clark, Terry Burke & Lewis G. Spurgin
Island species provide excellent models for investigating how selection and drift operate in wild populations, and for determining how these processes act to influence local adaptation and speciation. Here, we examine the role of selection and drift in shaping genomic and phenotypic variation across recently separated populations of Berthelot's pipit (Anthus berthelotii), a passerine bird endemic to three archipelagos in the Atlantic. We first characterised genetic diversity and population structuring, which supported previous inferences of...

Data from: Cryptic haplotype-specific gamete selection yields offspring with optimal MHC immune genes

Tobias L. Lenz, Nina Hafer, Irene E. Samonte, Sarah E. Yeates & Manfred Milinski
Females choose specific mates in order to produce fitter offspring. However, several factors interfere with females' control over fertilization of their eggs, including sneaker males and phenotypically unpredictable allele segregation during meiosis. Mate choice at the individual level thus provides only a poor approximation for obtaining the best genetic match. Consequently, post-copulatory sperm selection by female oocytes has been proposed as a mechanism to achieve complementary combinations of parental haplotypes. Here, using controlled in vitro...

Seasonal streambed carbon and nitrogen cycling (including greenhouse gases) in an agriculturally-impacted stream. Measured at Wood Brook UK, 2016-2017

S. Comer-Warner, S. Krause, D.C. Gooddy, S. Ullah & S.K. Wexler
The dataset contains chemistry data from streambed porewater (10 and 20 cm) and surface water, as well as nitrogen chemistry data at 2.5 cm resolution within the upper 15 cm of the streambed. The dataset includes concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), carbon dioxide, methane, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and nitrous oxide, and isotopic ratios of δ13CCO2, δ15NNO3+NO2 and δ18ONO3+NO2. Also included are measurements of dissolved oxygen and temperature. Samples were collected from three reaches within...

Data from: Local extinctions of obligate frugivores and patch size reduction disrupt the structure of seed dispersal networks

Jamille De Assis Bomfim, , Carlos A. Peres, Gustavo Carvalho & Eliana Cazetta
A central problem in ecology is to understand how human impacts affect plant-animal interactions that lead to effective seed dispersal services for plant communities. Seed dispersal services are the outcome of plant-frugivore interactions that often form local networks of interacting species. Recent work has shown that some frugivorous bird species are more critical to network organization than others. Here, we explore how patch size and the potential local extinctions of obligate frugivorous birds affect the...

Data from: Using DNA metabarcoding for simultaneous inference of common vampire bat diet and population structure

Kristine Bohmann, Shyam Gopalakrishnan, Martin Nielsen, Luisa Dos Santos Bay Nielsen, Gareth Jones, Daniel G. Streicker & M. Thomas P. Gilbert
Metabarcoding diet analysis has become a valuable tool in animal ecology; however, co-amplified predator sequences are not generally used for anything other than to validate predator identity. Exemplified by the common vampire bat we demonstrate the use of metabarcoding to infer predator population structure alongside diet assessments. Growing populations of common vampire bats impact human, livestock and wildlife health in Latin America through transmission of pathogens, such as lethal rabies infections. Techniques to determine large...

Data from: Debugging diversity – a pan‐continental exploration of the potential of terrestrial blood‐feeding leeches as a vertebrate monitoring tool

Ida Bærholm Schnell, Kristine Bohmann, Sebastian E. Schultze, Stine R. Richter, Dáithí C. Murray, Mikkel-Holger S. Sinding, David Bass, John E. Cadle, Mason J. Campbell, Rainer Dulch, David P. Edwards, Thomas N. E. Gray, Teis Hansen, Anh N. Q. Hoa, Christina Lehmkuhl Noer, Sigrid Heise-Pavlov, Adam F. Sander Pedersen, Juliot C. Ramamonjisoa, Mark E. Siddall, Andrew Tilker, Carl Traeholt, Nicholas Wilkinson, Paul Woodcock, Douglas W. Yu, Mads Frost Bertelsen … & Ida Baerholm Schnell
The use of environmental DNA (eDNA) has become an applicable non-invasive tool with which to obtain information about biodiversity. A sub-discipline of eDNA is iDNA (invertebrate-derived DNA), where genetic material ingested by invertebrates is used to characterise the biodiversity of the species that served as hosts. While promising, these techniques are still in their infancy, as they have only been explored on limited numbers of samples from only a single or a few different locations....

Data from: Whole genome duplication and transposable element proliferation drive genome expansion in Corydoradinae catfishes

Sarah Marburger, Markos A. Alexandrou, John B. Taggart, Simon Creer, Gary Carvalho, Claudio Oliveira & Martin I. Taylor
Genome size varies significantly across eukaryotic taxa and the largest changes are typically driven by macro-mutations such as whole genome duplications (WGDs) and proliferation of repetitive elements. These two processes may affect the evolutionary potential of lineages by increasing genetic variation and changing gene expression. Here we elucidate the evolutionary history and mechanisms underpinning genome size variation in a species rich group of Neotropical catfishes (Corydoradinae) with extreme variation in genome size - 0.6pg to...

Data from: Comparisons of reproductive function and fatty acid fillet quality between triploid and diploid farm Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

David S. Murray, Martin J. Kainz, Laura Hebberecht, Kris R. Sales, Kjetil Hindar & Matthew J.G. Gage
Triploidy could prevent escaped farm salmon breeding in the wild, while also improving nutrient quality within farmed fillets. Despite these potential advantages, triploid Atlantic salmon have not been widely used in aquaculture, and their reproductive function has yet to be fully evaluated. Here, we compare reproductive function and fillet composition between triploid and diploid farm salmon under standard aquaculture rearing conditions. We show that female triploids are sterile and do not develop gonads. In contrast,...

Data from: Exploring and visualising spaces of tree reconciliations

Katharina T. Huber, Vincent Moulton, Marie-France Sagot & Blerina Sinaimeri
Tree reconciliation is the mathematical tool that is used to investigate the coevolution of organisms, such as hosts and parasites. A common approach to tree reconciliation involves specifying a model that assigns costs to certain events, such as cospeciation, and then tries to find a mapping between two specified phylogenetic trees which minimises the total cost of the implied events. For such models, it has been shown that there may be a huge number of...

Data from: Immunogenetic novelty confers a selective advantage in host-pathogen coevolution

Karl P. Phillips, Joanne Cable, Ryan S. Mohammed, Magdalena Herdegen-Radwan, Jaroslaw Raubic, Karolina J. Przesmycka, Cock Van Oosterhout & Jacek Radwan
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is crucial to the adaptive immune response of vertebrates and is among the most polymorphic gene families known. Its high diversity is usually attributed to selection imposed by fast-evolving pathogens. Pathogens are thought to evolve to escape recognition by common immune alleles, and, hence, novel MHC alleles, introduced through mutation, recombination, or gene flow, are predicted to give hosts superior resistance. Although this theoretical prediction underpins host–pathogen “Red Queen” coevolution,...

Data from: Subordinate females in the cooperatively breeding Seychelles warbler obtain direct benefits by joining unrelated groups

Frank Groenewoud, Sjouke A. Kingma, Martijn Hammers, Hannah L. Dugdale, Terry Burke, David S. Richardson & Jan Komdeur
1. In many cooperatively breeding animals, a combination of ecological constraints and benefits of philopatry favours offspring taking a subordinate position on the natal territory instead of dispersing to breed independently. However, in many species individuals disperse to a subordinate position in a non-natal group (“subordinate between-group” dispersal), despite losing the kin-selected and nepotistic benefits of remaining in the natal group. It is unclear which social, genetic and ecological factors drive between-group dispersal. 2. We...

Data from: Experimental heatwaves compromise sperm function and cause transgenerational damage in a model insect

Kris Sales, Ramakrishnan Vasudeva, Matthew E. Dickinson, Joanne L. Godwin, Alyson J. Lumley, Lukasz Michalkzyk, Laura Hebberecht, Paul Thomas, Aldina Franco & Matthew J.G. Gage
Climate change is affecting biodiversity, but proximate drivers remain poorly understood. Here, we examine how experimental heatwaves impact on reproduction in an insect system. Male sensitivity to heat is recognised in endotherms, but ectotherms have received limited attention, despite comprising most of biodiversity and being more influenced by temperature variation. Using a flour beetle model system, we find that heatwave conditions (5 to 7 °C above optimum for 5 days) damaged male, but not female,...

Data from: Moving from frugivory to seed dispersal: incorporating the functional outcomes of interactions in plant-frugivore networks

Benno I. Simmons, William J. Sutherland, Lynn V. Dicks, Jörg Albrecht, Nina Farwig, Daniel Garcia, Pedro Jordano & Juan P. González-Varo
1.There is growing interest in understanding the functional outcomes of species interactions in ecological networks. For many mutualistic networks, including pollination and seed dispersal networks, interactions are generally sampled by recording animal foraging visits to plants. However, these visits may not reflect actual pollination or seed dispersal events, despite these typically being the ecological processes of interest. 2.Frugivorous animals can act as seed dispersers, by swallowing entire fruits and dispersing their seeds, or as pulp...

Data from: Contribution of maternal effects to dietary selection in Mediterranean fruit flies.

Philip T. Leftwich, William J. Nash, Lucy A. Friend & Tracey Chapman
Individual responses to dietary variation represent a fundamental component of fitness, and nutritional adaptation can occur over just a few generations. Maternal effects can show marked proximate responses to nutrition, but whether they contribute to longer-term dietary adaptation is unclear. Here we tested the hypotheses that maternal effects: (i) contribute to dietary adaptation, (ii) diminish when dietary conditions are constant between generations, (iii) are trait-specific and (iv) interact with high- and low-quality food. We used...

Data from: Drivers of power line use by white storks: a case study of birds nesting on anthropogenic structures

Francisco Moreira, Ricardo C. Martins, Ines Catry & Marcello D'Amico
1. Anthropogenic structures are mainly known to have negative impacts on wildlife populations but sometimes arethey can be beneficial. Power lines are a main driver of bird mortality through collision or electrocution, but electricity pylons are also commonly used for nest building by some species. Birds and nests cause power outages that need to be tackled by electricity companies. However, the use of pylons by threatened species provides an opportunity for conservation purposes. 2. In...

Data from: How quantitative is metabarcoding: a meta-analytical approach

Philip D. Lamb, Ewan Hunter, John K. Pinnegar, Simon Creer, Richard G. Davies & Martin I. Taylor
Metabarcoding has been used in a range of ecological applications such as taxonomic assignment, dietary analysis, and the analysis of environmental DNA. However, after a decade of use in these applications there is little consensus on the extent to which proportions of reads generated corresponds to the original proportions of species in a community. To quantify our current understanding we conducted a structured review and meta-analysis. The analysis suggests that a weak quantitative relationship may...

Data from: Control of seminal fluid protein expression via regulatory hubs in D. melanogaster

Irina Mohorianu, Emily K. Fowler, Tamas Dalmay & Tracey Chapman
Highly precise, yet flexible and responsive co-ordination of expression across groups of genes underpins the integrity of many vital functions. However, our understanding of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is often hampered by the lack of experimentally tractable systems, by significant computational challenges derived from the large number of genes involved or from difficulties in the accurate identification and characterization of gene interactions. Here we used a tractable experimental system in which to study GRNs: the...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    22

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    22

Affiliations

  • University of East Anglia
    22
  • Bangor University
    3
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • Earlham Institute
    2
  • University of Leeds
    2
  • University of Copenhagen
    2
  • University of Sheffield
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Oviedo
    1
  • Plymouth University
    1