25 Works

Plankton Imager zooplankton data, acoustic fish biomass estimates, chlorophyll measurements and CTD data from the Celtic Sea and Western English Channel in October 2018

Zooplankton species and size data from the Plankton Imager taken from the Celtic Sea and Western English Channel onboard the RV “Cefas Endeavour” in October 2018, also included are pelagic fish biomass estimates from acoustics, chlorophyll measurements and temperature and salinity data from CTDs. All data were recorded as part of the annual PELTIC survey (Pelagic ecosystem in the western English Channel and eastern Celtic Sea). During the day, multifrequency acoustic data are acquired along...

Payoff of the Grain for Green policy

Shixiong Cao, Chengqi Xia, Junli Xian, Hao Guo & Heran Zheng
1. To protect the global ecological environment and prevent threats to human safety and property, nations around the world have invested heavily in ecological restoration programmes. However, we don’t know whether these investments have been repaid by the resultant benefits. 2. To answer this question, we developed an improved method of quantifying costs and benefits that accounts for more of the costs associated with ecological restoration, thereby letting us calculate the net benefit. 3. To...

Mating patterns influence vulnerability to the extinction vortex

Joanne Godwin, Alyson J. Lumley, Łukasz Michalczyk, Oliver Y. Martin & Matthew J. G. Gage
Earth’s biodiversity is undergoing mass extinction due to anthropogenic compounding of environmental, demographic and genetic stresses. These different stresses can trap populations within a reinforcing feedback loop known as the extinction vortex, in which synergistic pressures build upon one another through time, driving down population viability. Sexual selection, the widespread evolutionary force arising from competition, choice and reproductive variance within animal mating patterns, could have vital consequences for population viability and the extinction vortex: 1)...

Kiribati Water Quality Monitoring Data - March 2019

Full water quality monitoring data set from the Commonwealth Marine Economies Programme survey around Tarawa, Kiribati in March 2019. This work was hosted and supported by the Kiribati Ministry of Lands, Environment and Development Environment and Conservation Division (MELAD-ECD), a list of collaborators is given in the attached readme file. The key parameters measured were: nutrients, chlorophyll, total suspended solids, E coli., intestinal Enterococci, vibrio and ESBL-producing bacteria (as a measure of antimicrobial resistance). In...

Intrinsic post-ejaculation sperm ageing does not affect offspring fitness in Atlantic salmon

Simone Immler, Cosima Hotzy, Bao Xuhui & Tuuli Larva
Postmeiotic sperm ageing, both before and after ejaculation, has been shown to negatively affect offspring fitness by lowering the rate of embryonic development, reducing embryonic viability, and decreasing offspring condition. These negative effects are thought to be caused by intrinsic factors such as oxidative stress and ATP depletion or extrinsic factors such as temperature and osmosis. Effects of post-ejaculation sperm ageing on offspring fitness have so far almost exclusively been tested in internal fertilisers. Here,...

Brain size and life history variables in birds

Dante Jiménez-Ortega, Niclas Kolm, Simone Immler, Alexei A. Maklakov & Alejandro González-Voyer
The database contains information on brain size, body mass, life-history traits and development mode for a total of 620 bird species. The taxonomy follows Jetz et. al. (2012). For life-history the database includes information for the following six variables: clutch size, egg size, incubation period, fledging age, maximum longevity; as well as development mode (altricial, semialtricial, precocial and semiprecocial). Additionally, in most cases there is information about the origin or the sampled specimen (captivity vs...

Raw data for Leigh et al 2020: Satyrization in Drosophila fruiflies

Tracey Chapman
The satyr of Greek mythology was half-man, half-goat, with an animal persona signifying immoderate sexual appetites. In biology, satyrization is the disruption of reproduction in matings between closely-related species. Interestingly, its effects are often reciprocally asymmetric, manifesting more strongly in one direction of heterospecific mating than the other. Heterospecific matings are well known to result in female fitness costs due to the production of sterile or inviable hybrid offspring and can also occur due to...

Haematocrit, age and survival in a vertebrate population

Thomas Brown, Martijn Hammers, Martin Taylor, Hannah Dugdale, Jan Komdeur & David Richardson
Understanding trade-offs in wild populations is difficult, but important if we are to understand the evolution of life histories and the impact of ecological variables upon them. Markers that reflect physiological state and predict future survival would be of considerable benefit to unravelling such trade-offs and could provide insight into individual variation in senescence. However, currently used markers often yield inconsistent results. One underutilised measure is haematocrit, the proportional of blood comprising of erythrocytes, which...

Data from: Fitness consequences of redundant cues of competition in male D. melanogaster

Tracey Chapman, Alice Dore & Amanda Bretman
Phenotypic plasticity can allow animals to adapt their behaviour, such as their mating effort, to their social and sexual environment. However, this relies on the individual receiving accurate and reliable cues of the environmental conditions. This can be achieved via the receipt of multimodal cues, which may provide redundancy and robustness. Male Drosophila melanogaster detect presence of rivals via combinations of any two or more redundant cue components (sound, smell and touch) and respond by...

Data from: A critical analysis of the potential for EU Common Agricultural Policy measures to support wild pollinators on farmland

Lorna Cole, David Kleijn, Lynn Dicks, Jane Stout, Simon Potts, Matthias Albrecht, Mario Balzan, Ignasi Bartomeus, Penelope Bebeli, Danilo Bevk, Jacobus Biesmeijer, Róbert Chlebo, Anželika Dautartė, Nikolaos Emmanouil, Chris Hartfield, John Holland, Andrea Holzschuh, Nieke Knoben, Anikó Kovács-Hostyánszki, Yael Mandelik, Heleni Panou, Robert Paxton, Theodora Petanidou, Miguel Pinheiro De Carvalho, … & Jeroen Scheper
1. Agricultural intensification and associated loss of high-quality habitats are key drivers of insect pollinator declines. With the aim of decreasing the environmental impact of agriculture, the 2014 EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) defined a set of habitat and landscape features (Ecological Focus Areas: EFAs) farmers could select from as a requirement to receive basic farm payments. To inform the post-2020 CAP, we performed a European-scale evaluation to determine how different EFA options vary in...

Pollution control can help mitigate future climate change impacts on European grayling in the UK

J. Vanessa Huml, W. Edwin Harris, Martin I. Taylor, Robin Sen, Christel Prudhomme & Jonathan S. Ellis
Aim We compare the performance of habitat suitability models using climate data only or climate data together with water chemistry, land cover and predation pressure data to model the distribution of European grayling (Thymallus thymallus). From these models, we (1) investigate the relationship between habitat suitability and genetic diversity; (2) project the distribution of grayling under future climate change and (3) model the effects of habitat mitigation on future distributions. Location United Kingdom Methods Maxent...

Data from: With a little help from my friends – Physiological integration facilitates invasion of wetland grass Elymus athericus into flooded soils

Peter Mueller, Hai T. Do, Christian Smit, Christoph Reisdorff, Kai Jensen & Stefanie Nolte
Tidal wetlands worldwide are undergoing rapid invasions by tall-growing clonal grasses. Prominent examples are invasions by species of the genera Spartina, Phragmites, and Elymus. The responsible physiological and ecological drivers of these invasions are poorly understood. Physiological integration (PI) is a key trait of clonal plants, which enables the exchange of resources among ramets. We investigated PI in Elymus athericus, which has been rapidly spreading from high-marsh into low-marsh environments of European salt marshes during...

Zooplankton abundance data derived from the Plankton Imager system from the Western English Channel and Eastern Irish Sea from 2016 to 2019

These data are abundances (in numbers per meters cubed) of zooplankton taxa, calculated from the analysis of images taken using the Plankton Imager system also included are station positions and sampling date / times. The images where collected using the PI (formerly known as Plankton Image Analyser (PIA)), during the PELTIC (Pelagic ecosystem in the western English Channel and eastern Celtic Sea) surveys from 2016 to 2019, on board the RV Cefas Endeavour. Zooplankton samples...

Ageing, Well-being and Development Project 2002, 2008

Armando Barrientos & Peter Lloyd-Sherlock

Data from: Temporal dynamics of competitive fertilization in social groups of red junglefowl (Gallus gallus) shed new light on avian sperm competition

Rômulo Carleial, Grant C. McDonald, Lewis G. Spurgin, Eleanor A. Fairfield, Yunke Wang, David S. Richardson & Tommaso Pizzari
Studies of birds have made a fundamental contribution to elucidating sperm competition processes, experimentally demonstrating the role of individual mechanisms in competitive fertilisation. However, the relative importance of these mechanisms and the way in which they interact under natural conditions remain largely unexplored. Here, we conduct a detailed behavioural study of freely-mating replicate groups of red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, to predict the probability that competing males fertilise individual eggs over the course of 10-day trials....

Data from: Age-dependent changes in infidelity in Seychelles warblers

Sara Raj Pant, Miartijn Hammers, Jan Komdeur, Terry Burke, Hannah Dugdale & David Richardson
Extra-pair paternity (EPP) is often linked to male age in socially monogamous vertebrates, i.e. older males are more likely to gain EPP and less likely to be cuckolded. However, whether this occurs because males improve at gaining paternity as they grow older, or because ‘higher quality’ males that live longer are preferred by females, has rarely been tested, despite being central to our understanding of the evolutionary drivers of female infidelity. Moreover, how extra-pair reproduction...

Data from: Environmental variation mediates the evolution of anticipatory parental effects

Martin Lind, Martyna Zwoinska, Johan Andersson, Hanne Carlsson, Therese Krieg, Tuuli Larva & Alexei Maklakov
Theory maintains that when future environment is predictable, parents should adjust the phenotype of their offspring to match the anticipated environment. The plausibility of positive anticipatory parental effects is hotly debated and the experimental evidence for the evolution of such effects is currently lacking. We experimentally investigated the evolution of anticipatory maternal effects in a range of environments that differ drastically in how predictable they are. Populations of the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei, adapted to 20°C,...

Feather isotope ratios and sexing of oystercatchers breeding in Iceland, 2013-2017

J.A. Gill, V. Mendez, T.G. Gunnarsson, J.A. Alves & B. Thorrison
Dataset comprises of the delta-13C and delta-15N stable isotopic information from feather samples (for 552 individuals) and the sex (assigned by DNA-analysis of blood samples for 321 individuals) of oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus) breeding in Iceland during the summers of 2013-2017. The Icelandic oystercatcher population contains individuals that stay in Iceland year-round and individuals that migrate to mainland Europe in the non-breeding season, and feather isotope ratios provide a means of distinguishing between these migratory behaviours...

Data from: Trade-off between somatic and germline repair in a vertebrate supports the expensive germ line hypothesis

Simone Immler, Hwei-Yen Chen, Kasparas Bublys, Cecile Jolly & Daniel Marcu
The disposable soma theory is a central tenet of the biology of aging where germline immortality comes at the cost of an aging soma [T. B. L. Kirkwood, Nature 270, 301–304 (1977); T. B. L. Kirkwood, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci. 205, 531–546 (1979); T. B. L. Kirkwood, S. N. Austad, Nature 408, 233–238 (2000)]. Limited resources and a possible trade-off between the repair and maintenance of the germ cells and growth and...

Code for Individual Based Model to assess impact of KHV release on carp population

Kate Mintram, Cock Van Oosterhout & Jackie Lighten
1: Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) is one of the top global invasive vertebrates and can cause significant ecological damage. The Australian Government’s National Carp Control Program (NCCP) proposes to release Koi Herpesvirus (KHV) to eradicate feral carp in one of the largest ecological interventions ever attempted. Ecological and human health risks have been highlighted regarding the release of a highly pathogenic viral biocontrol for an aquatic species. The efficacy of KHV has also been questioned,...

Data from: Adaptive thermal plasticity enhances sperm and egg performance in a model insect

Ramakrishnan Vasudeva, Andreas Sutter, Kris Sales, Matthew E. Dickinson, Alyson J. Lumley & Matthew J.G. Gage
Rising and more variable global temperatures pose a challenge for biodiversity, with reproduction and fertility being especially sensitive to heat. Here, we assessed the potential for thermal adaptation in sperm and egg function using Tribolium flour beetles, a warm-temperate-tropical insect model. Following temperature increases through adult development, we found opposing gamete responses, with males producing shorter sperm and females laying larger eggs. Importantly, this gamete phenotypic plasticity was adaptive: thermal translocation experiments showed that both...

Individual variation in migratory behavior in a sub-arctic partial migrant shorebird

Verónica Méndez Aragón, Jose Alves, Bodvar Þórisson, Alina Marca, Tomas Gunnarsson & Jennifer Gill
Migratory behavior can differ markedly amongst individuals within populations or species. Understanding the factors influencing this variation is key to understanding how current environmental changes might influence migratory propensity and the distribution and abundance of migratory species across their range. Here, we investigate variation in migratory behavior of the partially migratory Eurasian oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus) population breeding in Iceland. We use resightings of color-ringed adults and stable isotopes to determine whether individuals migrate or remain...

Raw data for: Plastic male mating behaviour evolves in response to the competitive environment

Tracey Chapman
Male reproductive phenotypes can evolve in response to the social and sexual environment. The expression of many such phenotypes may also be plastic within an individual’s lifetime. For example, male Drosophila melanogaster show significantly extended mating duration following a period of exposure to conspecific male rivals. The costs and benefits of reproductive investment, and plasticity itself, can be shaped by the prevailing socio-sexual environment and by resource availability. We investigated these ideas using experimental evolution...

Phytplanction Juruá River

Joao Vitor Campos-Silva & Carlos Peres
1. Tropical floodplains secure the protein supply of millions of people, but only sound management can ensure the long-term continuity of such ecosystem services. Overfishing is a widespread threat to multitrophic systems, but how it affects ecosystem functioning is poorly understood, particularly in tropical freshwater foodwebs. Models based on temperate lakes frequently assume that primary producers are mostly bottom-up controlled by nutrient and light limitations, with negligible effects of top-down forces. Yet this assumption remains...

Experimental evidence that novel land management interventions inspired by history enhance biodiversity

Robert Hawkes, Jennifer Smart, Andy Brown, Helen Jones, Steve Lane, Colin Lucas, James McGill, Nick Owens, Amanda Ratier Backes, Jonathan Webb, Doreen Wells & Paul Dolman
To address biodiversity declines within semi-natural habitats, land-management must cater for diverse taxonomic groups. Integrating our understanding of the ecological requirements of priority (rare, scarce or threatened) species through ‘biodiversity auditing’, with that of the intensity and complexity of historical land-use, encourages novel forms of management. Experimental confirmation is needed to establish whether this enhances biodiversity conservation relative to routine management. Biodiversity auditing and historical land-use of dry-open terrestrial habitats in Breckland (Eastern England) both...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    25

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    25

Affiliations

  • University of East Anglia
    25
  • University of Aveiro
    2
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • University of Iceland
    2
  • Jagiellonian University
    2
  • Uppsala University
    2
  • Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science
    2
  • Minzu University of China
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • Plymouth University
    1