21 Works

Data from: Microbial-tubeworm associations in a 440 million year old hydrothermal vent community

Magdalena N. Georgieva, Crispin T.S. Little, Russell J. Bailey, Alexander D. Ball, Adrian G. Glover & Crispin T. S. Little
Microorganisms are the chief primary producers within present-day deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems, and play a fundamental role in shaping the ecology of these environments. However, very little is known about the microbes that occurred within, and structured ancient vent communities. The evolutionary history, diversity, and the nature of interactions between ancient vent microorganisms and hydrothermal vent animals are largely undetermined. The oldest known hydrothermal vent community that includes metazoans is preserved within the Ordovician-early Silurian...

Data from: Flower preferences and pollen transport networks for cavity nesting solitary bees: implications for the design of agri-environment schemes

Catherine E.A. Gresty, Elizabeth Clare, Dion S. Devey, Robyn S. Cowan, Laszlo Csiba, Panagiota Malakasi, Owen T. Lewis, Katherine J. Willis & Catherine E. A. Gresty
Floral foraging resources are valuable for pollinator conservation on farmland, and their provision is encouraged by agri-environment schemes in many countries. Across Europe, wildflower seed mixtures are widely sown on farmland to encourage pollinators, but the extent to which key pollinator groups such as solitary bees exploit and benefit from these resources is unclear. We used high-throughput sequencing of 164 pollen samples extracted from the brood cells of 6 common cavity nesting solitary bee species...

Data from: Sperm morph and remating frequency in the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella

Doko-Miles J. Thorburn, Robert J. Knell & Jonathan M. Parrett
All Lepidoptera produce two sperm types: normal, nucleated ‘eupyrene’ sperm and anucleate ‘apyrene’ sperm. One hypothesis for the evolution of apyrene sperm suggests that they act to reduce female remating rate. Apyrene sperm require less resources to produce than do eupyrene sperm, and could delay remating by females by acting as a “cheap filler”, packing the spermatheca and thereby reducing receptivity. This would reduce the risk of sperm competition, giving a potential adaptive advantage to...

The influence of large woody debris (LWD) on in situ riverbed nitrogen transformations in the Hammer Stream (Hampshire, UK)

M. Trimmer
This dataset contains results from in situ field measurements of riverbed nitrogen transformations in the Hammer Stream, a sandy tributary of the River Rother in West Sussex, UK. Measurements were performed in November 2014 and February, April and July 2015. The data include baseline concentrations of nutrients (NO2, NO3, NH3, PO4), chloride, oxygen, pH, temperature, Fe(II), organic carbon, 15N-N2 and methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) sampled from porewater prior to injection of 15N-nitrate.

Data from: Presence of blood in gastric juice: a sensitive marker for gastric cancer screening in a poor resource setting

Violet Kayamba, Kanekwa Zyambo & Paul Kelly
Background: Gastric cancer survival rates in Africa are low as many cases are diagnosed late. Currently, there are no inexpensive, non-invasive and simple techniques that can be employed in poor resource settings for early case detection. In this study, we explored the possibility using blood in gastric juice as a screening tool to identify patients requiring referral for endoscopy. Methods: The study was conducted at the University Teaching Hospital endoscopy unit in Lusaka, Zambia. During...

Hampshire Avon: Dissolved oxygen data collected at one minute intervals from five river reaches

C.M. Heppell & S.J. Parker
This dataset contains instream dissolved oxygen data collected continuously at one minute intervals for five sites in the Hampshire Avon catchment in the United Kingdom. Data were collected between August 2014 and August 2015 using miniDOT loggers.

Methane ebullition from two lowland floodplain fens

C. M. Heppell, K.M. Stanley & L.R. Belyea
This dataset includes measurements of methane fluxes from two lowland floodplain fen sites in East Anglia, UK under conservation management (Sutton and Strumpshaw Fens). The data were collected on seven monthly to bimonthly visits during 2013 and comprise methane ebullition fluxes measured using inverted funnels, and methane fluxes measured using static chambers. The tall, static chambers captured methane transported by diffusion, plant-mediated transport and steady ebullition, whereas the inverted funnels captured methane transported by steady...

Data from: Assessing niche partitioning of co-occurring sibling bat species by DNA metabarcoding

Aitor Arrizabalaga-Escudero, Elizabeth L. Clare, Egoitz Salsamendi, Antton Alberdi, Inazio Garin, Joxerra Aihartza & Urtzi Goiti
Niche partitioning through foraging is a mechanism likely involved in facilitating the coexistence of ecologically similar and co-occurring animal species by separating their use of resources. Yet, this mechanism is not well understood in flying insectivorous animals. This is particularly true of bats, where many ecologically similar or cryptic species coexist. The detailed analysis of the foraging niche in sympatric, cryptic sibling species provides an excellent framework to disentangle the role of specific niche factors...

Data from: DNA metabarcoding reveals changes in the contents of carnivorous plants along an elevation gradient

Joanne E. Littlefair, Axel Zander, Clara De Sena Costa & Elizabeth L. Clare
Resource variation along abiotic gradients influences subsequent trophic interactions and these effects can be transmitted through entire food webs. Interactions along abiotic gradients can provide clues as to how organisms will face changing environmental conditions, such as future range shifts. However, it is challenging to find replicated systems to study these effects. Phytotelmata, such as those found in carnivorous plants, are isolated aquatic communities and thus form a good model for the study of replicated...

Data from: Foraging bumblebees acquire a preference for neonicotinoid-treated food with prolonged exposure

Andres N. Arce, Ana Ramos Rodrigues, Jiajun Yu, Thomas J. Colgan, Yannick Wurm & Richard J. Gill
Social bees represent an important group of pollinating insects but can be exposed to potentially harmful pesticides when foraging on treated or contaminated flowering plants. To investigate if such exposure is detrimental to bees, many studies have exclusively fed individuals with pesticide spiked food, informing us about the hazard but not necessarily the risk of exposure. Whilst such studies are important to establish the physiological and behavioural effects on individuals they do not consider the...

Soil biochemical measurements from salt marshes of different ages on the Essex coast, UK (2011)

A. Burden, A. Garbutt, S. Hughes, S. Oakley & J.A. Tempest
The dataset comprises biochemical measurements of salt marsh soil, and samples from fields on former salt marsh, taken using a soil corer. Sampling was conducted at three restored salt marshes and six accidentally breached sites on the Essex coast, UK, providing a chronosequence from 16 to 114 years since restoration of tidal flow. Natural salt marsh at all sites were also sampled, along with adjacent fields on former salt marsh (where access permitted). All salt...

Mammal occurrence identified from metabarcoding of two leech species from Sabah, Malaysia

R. Drinkwater, I.D. Schnell, K. Bohmann, H. Bernard, G. Veron, E. Clare, T.P. Gilbert & S.J. Rossiter
This dataset contains the results from a metabarcoding study of terrestrial leech blood meals to detect differences in the diets of two leech species, Haemadipsa picta and Haemadipsa sumatrana. Mammal taxa were identified using metabarcoding of 16s rRNA and comparisons of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to a curated reference database from NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) GenBank. All leeches were collected from the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems project (SAFE; www.SAFEproject.net) as part of...

Data from: The effect of sexual selection on adaptation and extinction under increasing temperatures

Jonathan M. Parrett & Robert J. Knell
Strong sexual selection has been reported to both enhance and hinder the adaptive capacity and persistence of populations when exposed to novel environments. Consequently, how sexual selection influences population adaption and persistence under stress remains widely debated. Here we present two empirical investigations of the fitness consequences of sexual selection on populations of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, exposed to stable or gradually increasing temperatures. When faced with increasing temperatures strong sexual selection was...

Data from: Age and quality-dependent DNA methylation correlate with melanin-based colouration in a wild bird

Carl D. Soulsbury, Anssi Lipponen, Kristie Wood, Charles A. Mein, Joe I. Hoffman, Christophe Lebigre & Joseph I. Hoffman
Secondary sexual trait expression can be influenced by fixed individual factors (such as genetic quality) but also by dynamic factors (such as age and environmentally induced gene expression) that may be associated with variation in condition or quality. In particular, melanin-based traits are known to relate to condition and there is a well-characterized genetic pathway underpinning their expression. However, the mechanisms linking variable trait expression to genetic quality remain unclear. One plausible mechanism is that...

Data from: Spatio-temporal and demographic variation in the diet of New Zealand lesser short-tailed bats (Mystacina tuberculata)

Zenon J. Czenze, J. Leon Tucker, Elizabeth L. Clare, Joanne E. Littlefair, David Hemprich-Bennet, Hernani F.M. Oliveira, R. Mark Brigham, Anthony J.R. Hickey & Stuart Parsons
Variation in the diet of generalist insectivores can be affected by site-specific traits including weather, habitat, and season, as well as demographic traits like reproductive status and age. We used molecular methods to compare diets of three distinct New Zealand populations of lesser short-tailed bats, Mystacina tuberculata. Summer diets were compared between a southern cold-temperate (Eglinton) and a northern population (Puroera). Winter diets were compared between Pureora and a subtropical offshore island population (Hauturu). This...

Data from: Counting with DNA in metabarcoding studies: how should we convert sequence reads to dietary data?

Bruce E. Deagle, Austen C. Thomas, Julie C. McInnes, Laurence J. Clarke, Eero J. Vesterinen, Elizabeth L. Clare, Tyler R. Kartzinel & J. Paige Eveson
Advances in DNA sequencing technology have revolutionised the field of molecular analysis of trophic interactions and it is now possible to recover counts of food DNA sequences from a wide range of dietary samples. But what do these counts mean? To obtain an accurate estimate of a consumer’s diet should we work strictly with datasets summarising frequency of occurrence of different food taxa, or is it possible to use relative number of sequences? Both approaches...

Data from: Dogs accompanied humans during the Neolithic expansion into Europe

Morgane Ollivier, Anne Tresset, Laurent A. F. Frantz, Stéphanie Brehard, Adrian Bălășescu, Marjan Mashkour, Adina Boroneant, Maud Pionnier-Capitan, Ophelie Lebrasseur, Rose-Marie Arbogast, László Bartosiewicz, Karyne Debue, Rivka Rabinovich, Mikhail V. Sablin, Greger Larson, Catherine Hänni, Christophe Hitte & Jean-Denis Vigne
Near Eastern Neolithic farmers introduced several species of domestic plants and animals as they dispersed into Europe. Dogs were the only domestic species present in both Europe and the Near East prior to the Neolithic. Here, we assessed whether early Near Eastern dogs possessed a unique mitochondrial lineage that differentiated them from Mesolithic European populations. We then analysed mitochondrial DNA sequences from 99 ancient European and Near-Eastern dogs spanning the Upper Palaeolithic to the Bronze...

Data from: Landscape heterogeneity strengthens the relationship between β-diversity and ecosystem function

Edd Hammill, Charles P. Hawkins, Hamish S. Greig, Pavel Kratina, Jonathan B. Shurin & Trisha B. Atwood
Consensus has emerged in the literature that increased biodiversity enhances the capacity of ecosystems to perform multiple functions. However, most biodiversity/ecosystem function studies focus on a single ecosystem, or on landscapes of homogenous ecosystems. Here we investigate how increased landscape-level environmental dissimilarity may affect the relationship between different metrics of diversity (α, β, or γ) and ecosystem function. We produced a suite of simulated landscapes, each of which contained four experimental outdoor aquatic mesocosms. Differences...

Data from: Synchronous diversification of Sulawesi's iconic artiodactyls driven by recent geological events

Laurent A. F. Frantz, Anna Rudzinski, Abang Mansyursyah Surya Nugraha, Allowen Evin, James Burton, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Anna Linderholm, Ross Barnett, Rodrigo Vega, Evan K. Irving-Pease, James Haile, Richard Allen, Kristin Leus, Jill Shephard, Mia Hillyer, Sarah Gillemot, Jeroen Van Den Hurk, Sharron Ogle, Cristina Atofanei, Mark G. Thomas, Friederike Johansson, Abdul Haris Mustari, John Williams, Kusdiantoro Mohamad, Chandramaya Siska Damayanti … & Greger Larson
The high degree of endemism on Sulawesi has previously been suggested to have vicariant origins, dating back 40 Myr ago. Recent studies, however, suggest that much of Sulawesi’s fauna assembled over the last 15 Myr. Here, we test the hypothesis that more recent uplift of previously submerged portions of land on Sulawesi promoted diversification, and that much of its faunal assemblage is much younger than the island itself. To do so, we combined palaeogeographical reconstructions...

Data from: Multifactorial processes underlie parallel opsin loss in neotropical bats

Alexa Sadier, Kalina T. J. Davies, Laurel R. Yohe, Kun Yun, Paul Donat, Brandon P. Hedrick, Elizabeth R. Dumont, Liliana M. Davalos, Stephen J. Rossiter & Karen E. Sears
The loss of previously adaptive traits is typically linked to relaxation in selection, yet the molecular steps leading to such repeated losses are rarely known. Molecular studies of loss have tended to focus on gene sequences alone, but overlooking other aspects of protein expression might underestimate phenotypic diversity. Insights based almost solely on opsin gene evolution, for instance, have made mammalian color vision a textbook example of phenotypic loss. We address this gap by investigating...

Data from: Approaches to integrating genetic data into ecological networks

Elizabeth L. Clare, Aron J. Fazekas, Natalia V. Ivanova, Robin M. Floyd, Paul D.N. Hebert, Amanda M. Adams, Juliet Nagel, Rebecca Girton, Steven G. Newmaster, M. Brock Fenton & Paul D. N. Hebert
As molecular tools for assessing trophic interactions become common, research is increasingly focused on the construction of interaction networks. Here we demonstrate three key methods for incorporating DNA data into network ecology and discuss analytical considerations using a model consisting of plants, insects, bats and their parasites from the Costa Rican dry forest. The simplest method involves the use of Sanger sequencing to acquire long sequences to validate or refine field identifications, for example of...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    21

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    21

Affiliations

  • Queen Mary University of London
    21
  • University of London
    6
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • Texas A&M University
    2
  • University of the Basque Country
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1
  • University of Eastern Finland
    1
  • Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp
    1
  • Utah State University
    1
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    1