19 Works

Data from: Leaf nutrients, not specific leaf area, are consistent indicators of elevated nutrient inputs

Jennifer Firn, James M. McGree, Eric Harvey, Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Martin Schütz, Yvonne M. Buckley, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Andrew M. MacDougall, Suzanne M. Prober, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren L. Sullivan, Erica Porter, Emma Ladouceur, Charlotte Allen, Karine H. Moromizato, John W. Morgan, W. Stanley Harpole, Yann Hautier, Nico Eisenhauer, Justin P. Wright, Peter B. Adler, Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker … & Anita C. Risch
Leaf traits are frequently measured in ecology to provide a ‘common currency’ for predicting how anthropogenic pressures impact ecosystem function. Here, we test whether leaf traits consistently respond to experimental treatments across 27 globally distributed grassland sites across 4 continents. We find that specific leaf area (leaf area per unit mass)—a commonly measured morphological trait inferring shifts between plant growth strategies—did not respond to up to four years of soil nutrient additions. Leaf nitrogen, phosphorus...

Data from: Potential limits to the benefits of admixture during biological invasion

Brittany S. Barker, Janelle E. Cocio, Samantha R. Anderson, Joseph E. Braasch, F. Alice Cang, Heather D. Gillette & Katrina M. Dlugosch
Species introductions often bring together genetically divergent source populations, resulting in genetic admixture. This geographic reshuffling of diversity has the potential to generate favorable new genetic combinations, facilitating the establishment and invasive spread of introduced populations. Observational support for the superior performance of admixed introductions has been mixed, however, and the broad importance of admixture to invasion questioned. Under most underlying mechanisms, admixture’s benefits should be expected to increase with greater divergence among and lower...

Data from: Non-native insects dominate daytime pollination in a high-elevation Hawaiian dryland ecosystem

Clare E. Aslan, Aaron B. Shiels, William Haines & Christina T. Liang
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Over one-third of the native flowering plant species in the Hawaiian Islands are listed as federally Threatened or Endangered. Lack of sufficient pollination could contribute to reductions in populations, reproduction, and genetic diversity among these species, but has been little studied. METHODS: We used systematic observations and manual flower treatments to quantify flower visitation and outcrossing dependency of eight native (including four Endangered) plant species in a dryland ecosystem in Hawaii:...

Data from: Within-species patterns challenge our understanding of the Leaf Economics Spectrum

Leander D.L. Anderegg, Logan T. Berner, Grayson Badgley, Meera L. Sethi, Beverly E. Law, Janneke HilleRisLambers & Leander D. L. Anderegg
The utility of plant functional traits for predictive ecology relies on our ability to interpret trait variation across multiple taxonomic and ecological scales. Using extensive datasets of trait variation within species, across species, and across communities, we analyzed whether and at what scales ‘leaf economics spectrum’ (LES) traits show predicted trait-trait covariation. We found that most variation in LES traits is often, but not universally, at high taxonomic levels (between families, between genera in a...

Data from: Parallel evolutionary forces influence the evolution of male and female songs in a tropical songbird

Brendan A. Graham, Daniel D. Heath, Ryan P. Walter, Melissa M. Mark & Daniel J. Mennill
Given the important role that animal vocalizations play in mate attraction and resource defence, acoustic signals are expected to play a significant role in speciation. Most studies, however, have focused on the acoustic traits of male animals living in the temperate zone. In contrast to temperate environments, in the tropics it is commonplace for both sexes to produce complex acoustic signals. Therefore tropical birds offer the opportunity to compare the sexes and provide a more...

Data from: Large effect quantitative trait loci for salicinoid phenolic glycosides in Populus: implications for gene discovery

Scott A. Woolbright, Brian J. Rehill, Richard L. Lindroth, Stephen P. DiFazio, Gregory D. Martinsen, Mathew S. Zinkgraf, Gerard J. Allan, Paul Keim, Thomas G. Whitham & Matthew S. Zinkgraf
Genomic studies have been used to identify genes underlying many important plant secondary metabolic pathways. However, genes for salicinoid phenolic glycosides (SPGs)—ecologically important compounds with significant commercial, cultural, and medicinal applications—remain largely undescribed. We used a linkage map derived from a full‐sib population of hybrid cottonwoods (Populus spp.) to search for quantitative trait loci (QTL) for the SPGs salicortin and HCH‐salicortin. SSR markers and primer sequences were used to anchor the map to the V3.0...

Data from: Independent and interactive effects of plant genotype and environment on plant traits and insect herbivore performance: a meta-analysis with Salicaceae

Hilary L. Barker, Liza M. Holeski & Richard L. Lindroth
1. Ecological research has increasingly highlighted the importance of intraspecific variation in shaping the structure and function of communities and ecosystems. Indeed, the effects of intraspecific variation can match or exceed those of interspecific variation. Previous reviews of intraspecific variation in plant traits across heterogeneous environments have focused primarily on mean phenotypic effects. We propose that a richer and fuller understanding of the ecological causes and consequences of intraspecific variation would be provided by partitioning...

Data from: Predator-induced changes in dissolved organic carbon dynamics

Romana Limberger, Julia Birtel, Hannes Peter, Núria Catalán, Daniel Da Silva Farias, Rebecca J. Best, Jakob Brodersen, Helmut Bürgmann & Blake Matthews
The fate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is partly determined by its availability to microbial degradation. Organisms at upper trophic levels could influence the bioavailability of DOC via cascading effects on primary producers and bacteria. Here we experimentally tested whether the presence of fish in aquatic food webs can indirectly affect the composition of the DOC pool. We found that fish had strong positive effects on phytoplankton biomass that affected the dynamics of DOC composition....

Data from: Reproduction as a bottleneck to treeline advance across the circumarctic forest tundra ecotone

Carissa D. Brown, Geneviève Dufour-Tremblay, Ryan G. Jameson, Steven D. Mamet, Andrew J. Trant, Xanthe J. Walker, Stéphane Boudraeu, Karen A. Harper, Greg H.R. Henry, Luise Hermanutz, Annika Hofgaard, Ludmila Isaeva, G. Peter Kershaw, Jill F. Johnstone & Gregory H. R. Henry
The fundamental niche of many species is shifting with climate change, especially in sub-arctic ecosystems with pronounced recent warming. Ongoing warming in sub-arctic regions should lessen environmental constraints on tree growth and reproduction, leading to increased success of trees colonising tundra. Nevertheless, variable responses of treeline ecotones have been documented in association with warming temperatures. One explanation for time lags between increasingly favourable environmental conditions and treeline ecotone movement is reproductive limitations caused by low...

Data from: Refinement of a theoretical trait space for North American trees via environmental filtering

Michael Fell & Kiona Ogle
We refer to a theoretical trait space (TTS) as an n-dimensional hypervolume (“hypercube”) characterizing the range of values and covariations among multiple functional traits, in the absence of explicit filtering mechanisms. We previously constructed a 32-dimensional TTS for North American trees by fitting the Allometrically Constrained Growth and Carbon Allocation (ACGCA) model to USFS Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data. Here, we sampled traits from this TTS, representing different individual “trees,” and subjected these trees...

Data from: Ecosystem context illuminates conflicting roles of plant diversity in carbon storage

E. Carol Adair, David U. Hooper, Alain Paquette & Bruce A. Hungate
Plant diversity can increase biomass production in plot‐scale studies, but applying these results to ecosystem carbon (C) storage at larger spatial and temporal scales remains problematic. Other ecosystem controls interact with diversity and plant production, and may influence soil pools differently from plant pools. We integrated diversity with the state‐factor framework, which identifies key controls, or ‘state factors’, over ecosystem properties and services such as C storage. We used this framework to assess the effects...

Data from: Tracing the effects of eutrophication on molluscan communities in sediment cores: outbreaks of an opportunistic species coincide with reduced bioturbation and high frequency of hypoxia in the Adriatic Sea

Adam Tomasovych, Ivo Gallmetzer, Alexandra Haselmair, Darrell S. Kaufman, Martina Kralj, Daniele Cassin, Roberto Zonta & Martin Zuschin
Estimating the effects and timing of anthropogenic impacts on the composition of macrobenthic communities is challenging because early 20th century surveys are sparse and the corresponding intervals in sedimentary sequences are mixed by bioturbation. Here, to assess the effects of eutrophication on macrobenthic communities in the northern Adriatic Sea, we account for mixing with dating of the bivalve Corbula gibba at two stations with high sediment accumulation (Po prodelta) and one station with moderate accumulation...

Data from: Chronic nitrogen addition induces a cascade of plant community responses with both seasonal and progressive dynamics

Xiaobing Zhou, Matthew Bowker, Ye Tao, Lin Wu, Yuanming Zhang & Matthew A. Bowker
Short-lived herbaceous plants provide a useful model to rapidly reveal how multiple generations of plants in natural plant communities of sensitive desert ecosystems will be affected by N deposition. We monitored dynamic responses of community structure, richness, evenness, density and biomass of herbaceous plants to experimental N addition (2:1 NH4+:NO3− added at 0, 0.5, 1, 3, 6 and 24 g N m− 2 a− 1) in three seasons in each of three years in the...

Data from: Gene exchange between two divergent species of the fungal human pathogen, Coccidioides

Colin Scott Maxwell, Kathleen Mattox, David A. Turissini, Marcus M. Teixeira, Bridget M. Barker & Daniel Ricardo Matute
The fungal genus Coccidioides is composed of two species, Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii. These two species are the causal agents of coccidioidomycosis, a pulmonary disease also known as valley fever. The two species are thought to have shared genetic material due to gene exchange in spite of their long divergence. To quantify the magnitude of shared ancestry between them, we analyzed the genomes of a population sample from each species. Next, we inferred what...

Data from: A decline in molluscan carbonate production driven by the loss of vegetated habitats encoded in the Holocene sedimentary record of the Gulf of Trieste

Adam Tomasovych, Ivo Gallmetzer, Alexandra Haselmair, Darrell S. Kaufman, Borut Mavric & Martin Zuschin
Carbonate sediments in non-vegetated habitats on the NE Adriatic shelf are dominated by shells of molluscs. However, the rate of carbonate molluscan production prior to the 20th century eutrophication and overfishing on this and other shelves remains unknown because (1) monitoring of ecosystems prior to the 20th century was scarce and (2) ecosystem history inferred from cores is masked by condensation and mixing. Here, based on geochronological dating of four bivalve species, carbonate production during...

Data from: The role of hybridization during ecological divergence of southwestern white pine (Pinus strobiformis) and limber pine (P. flexilis)

Mitra Menon, Justin C. Bagley, Christopher J. Friedline, Amy V. Whipple, Anna W. Schoettle, Alejandro Lael-Saenz, Christian Wehenkel, Francisco Molina-Freaner, Lluvia Flores-Renteria, M. Socorro Gonzalez-Elizondo, Richard A. Sniezko, Samuel A. Cushman, Kristen M. Waring & Andrew J. Eckert
Interactions between extrinsic factors, such as disruptive selection, and intrinsic factors, such as genetic incompatibilities among loci, often contribute towards the maintenance of species boundaries. The relative roles of these factors in the establishment of reproductive isolation can be examined using species pairs characterized by gene flow throughout their divergence history. We investigated the process of speciation and the maintenance of species boundaries between Pinus strobiformis and P. flexilis. Utilizing ecological niche modeling, demographic modeling,...

Data from: Genotypic variation in plant traits shapes herbivorous insect and ant communities on a foundation tree species

Hilary L. Barker, Liza M. Holeski & Richard L. Lindroth
Community genetics aims to understand the effects of intraspecific genetic variation on community composition and diversity, thereby connecting community ecology with evolutionary biology. Multiple studies have shown that different plant genotypes harbor different communities of associated organisms, such as insects. Yet, the mechanistic links that tie insect community composition to plant genetics are still not well understood. To shed light on these relationships, we explored variation in both plant traits (e.g., growth, phenology, defense) and...

Data from: Relative importance of competition and plant-soil feedback, their synergy, context dependency and implications for coexistence

Ylva Lekberg, James D. Bever, Rebecca A. Bunn, Ray M. Callaway, Miranda M. Hart, Stephanie N. Kivlin, John Klironomos, Beau G. Larkin, John L. Maron, Kurt O. Reinhart, Michael Remke, Wim H. Van Der Putten & Ragan M. Callaway
Plants interact simultaneously with each other and with soil biota, yet the relative importance of competition versus plant soil feedback (PSF) on plant performance is poorly understood. Using a meta-analysis of 38 published studies and 150 plant species, we show that effects of interspecific competition (either growing plants with a competitor or singly, or comparing inter- vs. intraspecific competition) and PSF (comparing home vs. away soil, live vs. sterile soil, or control vs. fungicide-treated soil)...

Data from: Effects of organism and substrate size on burial mechanics of English sole, Parophrys vetulus

Katherine A. Corn, Stacy C. Farina, Adam P. Summers & Alice C Gibb
Flatfishes use cyclic body undulations to force water into the sediment and fluidize substrate particles, displacing them into the water column. When water velocity decreases, suspended particles settle back onto the fish, hiding it from view. Burial may become more challenging as flatfishes grow because the area to be covered increases exponentially with the second power of length. In addition, particle size is not uniform in naturally occurring substrates, and larger particles require higher water...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    19

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    19

Affiliations

  • Northern Arizona University
    19
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    4
  • University of Washington
    3
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    3
  • Western Washington University
    3
  • University of Vienna
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • University of Quebec at Montreal
    1
  • University of Montana
    1