89 Works

Data from: Female song is widespread and ancestral in songbirds

Karan J. Odom, Michelle L. Hall, Katharina Riebel, Kevin E. Omland & Naomi E. Langmore
Bird song has historically been considered an almost exclusively male trait, an observation fundamental to the formulation of Darwin’s theory of sexual selection. Like other male ornaments, song is used by male songbirds to attract females and compete with rivals. Thus, bird song has become a textbook example of the power of sexual selection to lead to extreme neurological and behavioural sex differences. Here we present an extensive survey and ancestral state reconstruction of female...

Data from: Foraging efficiency and size matching in a plant – pollinator community: the importance of sugar content and tongue length

Saskia G.T. Klumpers, Martina Stang & Peter G.L. Klinkhamer
A longstanding question in ecology is how species interactions are structured within communities. Although evolutionary theory predicts close size matching between floral nectar tube depth and pollinator proboscis length of interacting species, such size matching has seldom been shown and explained in multispecies assemblages. Here, we investigated the degree of size matching among Asteraceae and their pollinators and its relationship with foraging efficiency. The majority of pollinators, especially Hymenoptera, choose plant species on which they...

Data from: Predator-prey interactions between shell-boring beetle larvae and rock-dwelling land snails

Els Baalbergen, Renate Helwerda, Rense Schelfhorst, Ruth F. Castillo Cajas, Coline H. M. Van Moorsel, Robin Kundrata, Francisco W. Welter-Schultes, Sinos Giokas & Menno Schilthuizen
Drilus beetle larvae (Coleoptera: Elateridae) are specialized predators of land snails. Here, we describe various aspects of the predator-prey interactions between multiple Drilus species attacking multiple Albinaria (Gastropoda: Clausiliidae) species in Greece. We observe that Drilus species may be facultative or obligate Albinaria-specialists. We map geographically varying predation rates in Crete, where on average 24% of empty shells carry fatal Drilus bore holes. We also provide first-hand observations and video-footage of prey entry and exit...

Data from: Sharp acoustic boundaries across an altitudinal avian hybrid zone despite asymmetric introgression

Wouter Halfwerk, Caroline Dingle, Dusan M. Brinkhuizen, Jelmer W. Poelstra, Jan Komdeur & Hans Slabbekoorn
Birdsong is a sexually selected trait that could play an important evolutionary role when related taxa come into secondary contact. Many songbird species however learn their songs through copying one or more tutors, which complicates the evolutionary outcome of such contact. Two subspecies of a presumed vocal learner, the grey-breasted wood-wren (Henicorhina leucophrys), replace each other altitudinally across the western slope of the Ecuadorian Andes. These subspecies are morphologically very similar, but show striking differences...

Global biogeography of fungal and bacterial biomass carbon in topsoil

Liyuan He, Jorge Rodrigues, Nadejda Soudzilovskaia, Milagros Barceló, Pål Axel Olsson, Changchun Song, Leho Tedersoo, Fenghui Yuan, Fengming Yuan, David Lipson & Xiaofeng Xu
Bacteria and fungi, representing two major soil microorganism groups, play an important role in global nutrient biogeochemistry. Biogeographic patterns of bacterial and fungal biomass are of fundamental importance for mechanistically understanding nutrient cycling. We synthesized 1323 data points of phospholipid fatty acid-derived fungal biomass C (FBC), bacterial biomass C (BBC), and fungi:bacteria (F:B) ratio in topsoil, spanning 11 major biomes. The FBC, BBC, and F:B ratio display clear biogeographic patterns along latitude and environmental gradients...

Data from: Foraging zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) are public information users rather than conformists

Edwin J. C. Van Leeuwen, Thomas Morgan & Katharina Riebel
Social learning enables adaptive information acquisition provided that it is not random but selective. To understand species typical decision-making and to trace the evolutionary origins of social learning, the heuristics social learners use need to be identified. Here, we experimentally tested the nature of majority influence in the zebra finch. Subjects simultaneously observed two demonstrator groups differing in relative and absolute numbers (ratios 1:2 / 2:4 / 3:3 / 1:5) foraging from two novel food...

Spatial patterns and ecological drivers of soil nematode β-diversity in natural grasslands vary among vegetation types and trophic position

Dan Xiong, Cunzheng Wei, Xugao Wang, Xiaotao Lü, Shuai Fang, Yingbin Li, Xiaobo Wang, Wenju Liang, Xingguo Han, T. Martijn Bezemer & Qi Li
1. Understanding biogeographic patterns of community assemblages is a core objective in ecology, but for soil communities these patterns are poorly understood. To understand the spatial patterns and underlying mechanisms of β-diversity in soil communities, we investigated the β-diversity of soil nematode communities along a 3200 km transect across semi-arid and arid grasslands. 2. Spatial turnover and nested-resultant are the two fundamental components of β-diversity, which have been attributed to various processes of community assembly....

A matter of time: Recovery of plant species diversity in wild plant communities at declining nitrogen deposition

Frank Berendse, Rob Geerts, Wim Elberse, Martijn Bezemer, Paul Goedhart, Wei Xue, Erik Noordijk, Cajo Ter Braak & Hein Korevaar
Aim: High levels of nitrogen deposition have been responsible for important losses of plant species diversity. It is often assumed that reduction of ammonia and nitrogen oxide emissions will result in the recovery of the former biodiversity. In Western Europe N deposition peaked between 1980 and 1988 and declined thereafter. In a 60-year experiment in hay meadows we tested the hypothesis that increasing and declining nitrogen deposition had negative, respectively, positive effects on plant species...

Data from: Soil microbiome responses to the short-term effects of Amazonian deforestation

Acácio A. Navarrete, Siu M. Tsai, Lucas W. Mendes, Karoline Faust, Mattias De Hollander, Noriko A. Cassman, Johannes A. Van Veen, Eiko E. Kuramae & Jeroen Raes
Slash-and-burn clearing of forest typically results in increase in soil nutrient availability. However, the impact of these nutrients on the soil microbiome is not known. Using next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene and shotgun metagenomic DNA, we compared the structure and the potential functions of bacterial community in forest soils to deforested soils in the Amazon region and related the differences to soil chemical factors. Deforestation decreased soil organic matter content and factors linked...

Data from: Environmentally induced dispersal-related life history syndrome in the tropical butterfly, Bicyclus anynana

Marjo Saastamoinen, Paul M. Brakefield & Otso Ovaskainen
Dispersal is a key process for understanding the persistence of populations as well as the capacity of organisms to respond to environmental change. Therefore understanding factors that may facilitate or constrain the evolution of dispersal is of crucial interest. Assessments of phenotypic variation in various behavioural, physiological and morphological traits related to insect dispersal and flight performance are common, yet very little is known about the genetic associations among these traits. We have used experiments...

Data from: The effect of atomoxetine on random and directed exploration in humans

Christopher M. Warren, Robert C. Wilson, Nic J. Van Der Wee, Eric J. Giltay, Martijn S. Van Noorden, Jonathan D. Cohen & Sander Nieuwenhuis
The adaptive regulation of the trade-off between pursuing a known reward (exploitation) and sampling lesser-known options in search of something better (exploration) is critical for optimal performance. Theory and recent empirical work suggest that humans use at least two strategies for solving this dilemma: a directed strategy in which choices are explicitly biased toward information seeking, and a random strategy in which decision noise leads to exploration by chance. Here we examined the hypothesis that...

Persistence of plant-mediated microbial soil legacy effects in soil and inside roots

Emilia Hannula, Robin Heinen, Martine Huberty, Katja Steinauer, Jonathan De Long, Renske Jongen & Martijn Bezemer
Plant-soil feedbacks are shaped by microbial legacies that plants leave in the soil. We tested the persistence of these legacies after subsequent colonization by the same or other plant species. Soil fungal legacies were detectable for months, but the current plant effect on fungi amplified in time. Contrary, in bacterial communities, legacies faded away rapidly and bacteria communities were influenced strongly by the current plant. However, both fungal and bacterial legacies were conserved inside the...

Data from: Climate impacts on trans-ocean dispersal and habitat in gray whales from the Pleistocene to 2100

S. Elizabeth Alter, Matthias Meyer, Klaas Post, Paul Czechowski, Peter Gravlund, Cork Gaines, Howard C. Rosenbaum, Kristin Kaschner, Samuel T. Turvey, Johannes Van Der Plicht, Beth Shapiro & Michael Hofreiter
Arctic animals face dramatic habitat alteration due to ongoing climate change. Understanding how such species have responded to past glacial cycles can help us forecast their response to today's changing climate. Gray whales are among those marine species likely to be strongly affected by Arctic climate change, but a thorough analysis of past climate impacts on this species has been complicated by lack of information about an extinct population in the Atlantic. While little is...

Data from: Plant community composition but not plant traits determine the outcome of soil legacy effects on plants and insects

Robin Heinen, Martijn Van Der Sluis, Arjen Biere, Jeffrey A. Harvey & T. Martijn Bezemer
1.Plants leave species-specific legacies in the soil they grow in that can represent changes in abiotic or biotic soil properties. It has been shown that such legacies can affect future plants that grow in the same soil (plant-soil feedback, PSF). Such processes have been studied in detail, but mostly on individual plants. Here we study PSF effects at the community level and use a trait-based approach both in the conditioning phase and in the feedback...

Data from: Fuel moisture content enhances nonadditive effects of plant mixtures on flammability and fire behavior

Luke G. Blauw, Niki Wensink, Lisette Bakker, Richard S. P. Van Logtestijn, Rien Aerts, Nadejda A. Soudzilovskaia & J. Hans C. Cornelissen
Fire behavior of plant mixtures includes a complex set of processes for which the interactive contributions of its drivers, such as plant identity and moisture, have not yet been unraveled fully. Plant flammability parameters of species mixtures can show substantial deviations of fire properties from those expected based on the component species when burnt alone; that is, there are nonadditive mixture effects. Here, we investigated how fuel moisture content affects nonadditive effects in fire behavior....

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in plant-soil feedbacks alters competitive interactions between two grassland plant species

Wei Xue, Frank Berendse & T. Martijn Bezemer
1. The effects of plants on soil vary greatly between plant species and in mixed plant communities this can lead to spatial variation in plant-soil feedback (PSF) effects. Such spatial effects are thought to influence plant species coexistence, but the empirical evidence for this hypothesis is limited. 2. Here, we investigate how spatial heterogeneity in PSFs influences plant growth and competition. The experiment was carried out with high and low nutrient soils to examine how...

Data from: Individual performance in relation to cytonuclear discordance in a northern contact zone between long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) lineages

Julie A. Lee-Yaw, Chris G. C. Jacobs & Darren E. Irwin
Cytonuclear discordance in contact zones between related lineages is common, with mitochondrial clines often being displaced from clines in nuclear allele frequency. Proposed explanations for such a pattern include adaptive introgression of mtDNA or a neutral wake of mtDNA being left behind following hybrid zone movement. However, studies investigating these hypotheses are rare. Our previous survey of genetic variation in the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) highlighted a potential case of cytonuclear discordance between two lineages...

Data from: Renal imaging in 199 Dutch patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: screening compliance and outcome

Paul Johannesma, Irma Van De Beek, Lawrence Rozendaal, Marianne Jonker, Simon Horenblas, Tijmen Van Der Wel, Jeroen Van Moorselaar, Hanne Meijers-Heijboer, Theo Starink, Arjan Houweling, Rinze Reinhard, Hans Gille, Pieter Postmus & Jan Hein Van Waesberghe
Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is associated with an increased risk for renal cell carcinoma. Surveillance is recommended, but the optimal imaging method and screening interval remain to be defined. The main aim of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of RCC surveillance to get insight in the safety of annual US in these patients. Surveillance data and medical records of 199 patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome were collected retrospectively using medical files and a questionnaire. These patients...

Data from: Are ecophysiological adaptive traits decoupled from leaf economics traits in wetlands?

Yingji Pan, Ellen Cieraad & Peter Van Bodegom
Wetland plants have developed a suite of traits, such as aerenchyma, radial oxygen loss, and leaf gas films, to adapt to wetland environment featured by e.g. a low redox potential and a lack of electron acceptors. These ecophysiological traits are critical for the survival and physiological functioning of wetland plants. Most studies on these traits typically focus on a single trait and a single or few species at the time. Next to these traits, traits...

Data from: Pupil diameter tracks lapses of attention

Ruud L. Van Den Brink, Peter R. Murphy & Sander Nieuwenhuis
Our ability to sustain attention for prolonged periods of time is limited. Studies on the relationship between lapses of attention and psychophysiological markers of attentional state, such as pupil diameter, have yielded contradicting results. Here, we investigated the relationship between tonic fluctuations in pupil diameter and performance on a demanding sustained attention task. We found robust linear relationships between baseline pupil diameter and several measures of task performance, suggesting that attentional lapses tended to occur...

Data from: Compositional and functional shifts in arctic fungal communities in response to experimentally increased snow depth

Tatiana A. Semenova, Luis N. Morgado, Jeffrey M. Welker, Marilyn D. Walker, Erik Smets & József Geml
Climate warming leads to more intensive evaporation from the Arctic sea resulting in increased precipitation in the low Arctic, e.g., higher snowfall during winter. Deeper snow keeps the arctic soils warmer and alters soil attributes and vegetation, e.g., increase in nitrogen availability, expansion of shrubs and decline in shade-intolerant lichens and bryophytes. Changes in soil properties and vegetation are expected to influence on saprotrophic and plant-symbiotic fungi, but how increased snow depth affects their community...

Data from: Scaling up flammability from individual leaves to fuel beds

Saskia Grootemaat, Ian Wright, Peter Van Bodegom, Johannes Cornelissen, Peter M. Van Bodegom, Ian J. Wright & Johannes H. C. Cornelissen
Wildfires play an important role in vegetation composition and structure, nutrient fluxes, human health and wealth, and are interlinked with climate change. Plants have an influence on wildfire behaviour and predicting this feedback is a high research priority. For upscaling from leaf traits to wildfire behaviour we need to know if the same leaf traits are important for the flammability of (i) individual leaves, and (ii) multiple leaves packed in fuel beds. Based on a...

Data from: Home-field advantages of litter decomposition increase with increasing N deposition rates: a litter and soil perspective

Ying-Bin Li, Qi Li, Jun-Jie Yang, Xiao-Tao Lv, Wen-Ju Liang, Xing-Guo Han & T. Martijn Bezemer
1. Differences in litter quality and in soil microbial community composition can influence the litter decomposition and “home-field advantage” (HFA). However, our knowledge about the relative role of litter and soil characteristics on litter decomposition and HFA effects is still limited, especially under long-term N deposition. 2. We collected soil and two types of litter (monospecific and mixed species litter) from five replicate plots from a long-term N-deposition field experiment with seven N-addition treatments (0,...

Data from: Temporal carry-over effects in sequential plant–soil feedbacks

Jasper R. Wubs, T. Martijn Bezemer & E. R. Jasper Wubs
Plant-soil feedbacks (PSF) strongly influence plant performance. However, to what extent these PSF effects are persistent in the soil and how they are altered by species that subsequently condition the soil is unclear. Here we test how conspecific and heterospecific soil-conditioning effects interact across different soil-conditioning phases. We conducted a fully factorial glasshouse experiment where six plant species conditioned soils in two consecutive phases and measured the performance of Jacobaea vulgaris. The species that conditioned...

Data from: Testing an hypothesis of hybrid zone movement for toads in France

Isolde Van Riemsdijk, Roger K. Butlin, Ben Wielstra, Jan W. Arntzen & Isolde Riemsdijk
Hybrid zone movement may result in substantial unidirectional introgression of selectively neutral material from the local to the advancing species, leaving a genetic footprint. This genetic footprint is represented by a trail of asymmetric tails and displaced cline centres in the wake of the moving hybrid zone. A peak of admixture linkage disequilibrium is predicted to exist ahead of the centre of the moving hybrid zone. We test these predictions of the movement hypothesis in...

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