Data from: The banana (Musa acuminata) genome and the evolution of monocotyledonous plants

Angelique D'Hont, France Denoeud, Jean-Marc Aury, Franc-Christophe Baurens, Françoise Carreel, Olivier Garsmeur, Benjamin Noel, Stéphanie Bocs, Gaëtan Droc, Mathieu Rouard, Corinne Da Silva, Jabbari Kamel, Céline Cardi, Julie Poulain, Marlène Souquet, Karine Labadie, Cyril Jourda, Juliette Lengellé, Marguerite Rodier-Goud, Adriana Alberti, Maria Bernard, Margot Correa, Saravanaraj Ayyampalayam, Michael R. McKain, Jim Leebens-Mack … & Patrick Wincker
Bananas (Musa spp.), including dessert and cooking types, are giant perennial monocotyledonous herbs of the order Zingiberales, a sister group to the well-studied Poales, which include cereals. Bananas are vital for food security in many tropical and subtropical countries and the most popular fruit in industrialized countries1. The Musa domestication process started some 7,000 years ago in Southeast Asia. It involved hybridizations between diverse species and subspecies, fostered by human migrations2, and selection of diploid...

Registration Year

  • 2012
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Évry Val d'Essonne
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  • University of Georgia
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  • University of California, Berkeley
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  • Genoscope
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  • University of Zurich
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  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
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  • University of Arizona
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  • Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation
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  • University of Leicester
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  • Institute of Experimental Botany
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