13 Works

A practical approach to measuring the biodiversity impacts of land conversion

América P. Durán, Jonathan M. H. Green, Christopher D. West, Piero Visconti, Neil Burgess, Malika Virah-Sawmy & Andrew Balmford
1. Further progress in reducing biodiversity loss relies on the improved quantification of the connections between drivers of habitat loss and subsequent biodiversity impacts. To this end, biodiversity impact metrics should be able to report linked trends in specific human activities and changes in biodiversity state, accounting for both the ecology of different species, and the cumulative effects of historical habitat losses. These characteristics are not currently captured within a single metric. 2. Here we...

Data from: Travel with your kin ship! Insights from genetic sibship among settlers of a coral damselfish

Vanessa Robitzch, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo & Michael L. Berumen
Coral reef fish larvae are tiny, exceedingly numerous, and hard to track. They are also highly capable, equipped with swimming and sensory abilities that may influence their dispersal trajectories. Despite the importance of larval input to the dynamics of a population, we remain reliant on indirect insights to the processes influencing larval behavior and transport. Here, we used genetic data (300 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms) derived from a light trap sample of a single recruitment...

Data from: Introduced beaver improve growth of non–native trout in Tierra del Fuego, South America

Ivan Arismendi, Brooke Penaluna & Carlos Jara
Species introductions threaten ecosystem function worldwide and interactions among introduced species may amplify their impacts. Effects of multiple invasions are still poorly studied and often the mechanisms underlying potential interactions among invaders are unknown. Despite being a remote and well–conserved area, the southern portion of South America has been greatly impacted by invasions of both the American Beaver (Castor canadensis) and Brown Trout (Salmo trutta fario). Here, we compared growth, condition, diet, and stable isotopes...

Didimosphenia geminata: sequences and morphology data set

Leyla Cardenas
Microalgae and their invasiveness are recurrent themes in aquatic environments and many invasions by microalgae are linked to eutrophication. However the diatom Didymosphenia geminata has gained notoriety in forming thick mucilaginous mats in pristine, rocky-bottomed rivers with no obvious connection to elevated levels of nutrients. This species is native to freshwaters of the circumboreal region of the Northern Hemisphere and blooms in the Southern Hemisphere have been attributed to recent introductions of the species to...

Exploring the genetic consequences of clonality in haplodiplontic taxa

Stacy Krueger-Hadfield, Marie-Laure Guillemin, Christophe Destombe, Myriam Valero & Solenn Stoeckel
Partially clonality is an incredibly common reproductive mode found across all the major eukaryotic lineages. Yet, population genetic theory is based on exclusive sexuality or exclusive asexuality and partial clonality is often ignored. This is particularly true in haplodiplontic eukaryotes, including algae, ferns, mosses, and fungi, where somatic development occurs in both the haploid and diploid stages. Haplodiplontic life cycles are predicted to be correlated with asexuality, but tests of this prediction are rare. Moreover,...

Files for phylogenetics, structure, and migration rate analyses for the bivalve Aequiyoldia eightsii

Carlos P. Muñoz-Ramírez, Chester Sands, David Barnes, James Scourse, Alejandro Roman-Gonzalez, Simon Morley, Leyla Cardenas, Antonio Brante & Michael Meredith
The Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) dominates the open-ocean circulation of the Southern Ocean, and both isolates and connects the Southern Ocean biodiversity. However, the impact on biological processes of other Southern Ocean currents is less clear. Adjacent to the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP), the ACC flows offshore in a northeastward direction, whereas the Antarctic Peninsula Coastal Current (APCC) follows a complex circulation pattern along the coast, with topographically-influenced deflections depending on the area. Using genomic...

Population genomic response to geographic gradients by widespread and endemic fishes of the Arabian Peninsula

Joseph DiBattista, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Marek Piatek, Fernando Cagua, Brian Bowen, John Choat, Luiz Rocha, Michelle Gaither, Jean-Paul Hobbs, Tane Sinclair-Taylor, Jennifer McIlwain, Mark Priest, Camrin Braun, Nigel Hussey, Steven Kessel & Michael Berumen
Genetic structure within marine species may be driven by local adaptation to their environment, or alternatively by historical processes, such as geographic isolation. The gulfs and seas bordering the Arabian Peninsula offer an ideal setting to examine connectivity patterns in coral reef fishes with respect to environmental gradients and vicariance. The Red Sea is characterized by a unique marine fauna, historical periods of desiccation and isolation, as well as environmental gradients in salinity, temperature, and...

The macroecology of fish migration

Dominique Alò, Shaw Lacy, Andrea Castillo, Horacio Samaniego & Pablo Marquet
Aim: We still lack a consensus on the main variables driving changes in migratory strategies. Different hypotheses have been proposed: productivity, energy, environmental heterogeneity, and genetic predisposition. This work takes an integrative view and analyzes migrations from a macroecological perspective estimating the extent to which different environmental variables and historic factors influence migratory life histories. Location: Global Time period: Current Major taxa studied: Actinopterygian fishes Methods: Using public domain museum records, global repositories, and global...

Microsatellite markers for assessing genetic diversity and kinship relationships in one of the largest South American fur seal (Arctocephalus australis) populations of the Pacific Ocean

Josefina Gutierrez
The genetic diversity of a population is the foundation of its adaptability to environmental challenges. The South American fur seal is a widely distributed pinniped in the south cone of South America. However, a large gap in the Pacific coast separates two distinct evolutionary units for the species: the Peruvian and the Southern Pacific/Atlantic populations. Throughout the Pacific, one of the main breeding colonies is located in Guafo Island, in the southern Chilean Patagonia. As...

Data from: Pro-inflammatory immune response is linked to wintering habitat in a migratory shorebird

José Mª Abad-Gómez, Auxiliadora Villegas, Jorge S. Gutiérrez, Manuel Parejo, Juan G. Navedo, Juan M. Sánchez-Guzmán & Afonso Rocha
Migratory shorebirds (Charadrii) show a strong dichotomy in their breeding and wintering strategies: Arctic-breeding species typically spend the wintering season in marine habitats, while more southerly breeding species tend to do so in freshwater habitats where pathogens and parasites, particularly vector-borne blood parasites, are generally more abundant. Thus, it has been hypothesized that the former group may reduce their investment in immunity, but experimental data supporting this hypothesis are lacking. Moreover, whether this contrasting habitat...

After a catastrophe, a little bit of sex is better than nothing: genetic consequences of a major earthquake on asexual and sexual populations

Ronan Becheler, Marie-Laure Guillemin, Solenn Stoeckel, Stéphane Mauger, Alice Saunier, Antonio Brante, Destombe Christophe & Valero Myriam
Catastrophic events can have profound effects on the demography of a population and consequently, on genetic diversity. The dynamics of post-catastrophic recovery as well as the role of sexual versus asexual reproduction in buffering the effects of massive perturbations remain poorly understood, in part because the opportunity to document genetic diversity before and after such events is rare. Six natural (purely sexual) and seven cultivated (mainly clonal due to farming practices) populations of the red...

Bill disparity and feeding strategies amongst fossil and modern penguins

Martin Chavez Hoffmeister
One of the most remarkable differences between Paleogene penguins and their living relatives is the shape and length of their beaks. Many of the Eocene and Oligocene penguins have a thin and elongated spear-like bill, which contrasts with the proportionally shorter and more robust bill of most living species. These differences suggest an important shift on their feeding strategies. This study explores the morphological disparity on the skull of penguins, emphasizing bill morphology and it...

A multi-state occupancy modeling framework for robust estimation of disease prevalence in multi-tissue disease systems

Vratika Chaudhary, Samantha M. Wisely, Felipe A. Hernández, James E. Hines, James D. Nichols & Madan K. Oli
1. Given the public health, economic, and conservation implications of zoonotic diseases, their effective surveillance is of paramount importance. The traditional approach to estimating pathogen prevalence as the proportion of infected individuals in the population is biased because it fails to account for imperfect detection. A statistically robust way to reduce bias in prevalence estimates is to obtain repeated samples (or sample many tissues in multi-tissue disease systems) and to apply statistical methods that account...

Registration Year

  • 2020
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Affiliations

  • University Austral de Chile
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  • Austral University of Chile
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  • King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
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  • Catholic University of the Most Holy Conception
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  • Pontifical Catholic University of Chile
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  • University of Alabama at Birmingham
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  • Oregon State University
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