4 Works

Modelling seasonal habitat suitability for wide-ranging species: Invasive wild pigs in northern Australia

Jens G. Froese, Carl S. Smith, Peter A. Durr, Clive A. McAlpine & Rieks D. Van Klinken
Invasive wildlife often causes serious damage to the economy and agriculture as well as environmental, human and animal health. Habitat models can fill knowledge gaps about species distributions and assist planning to mitigate impacts. Yet, model accuracy and utility may be compromised by small study areas and limited integration of species ecology or temporal variability. Here we modelled seasonal habitat suitability for wild pigs, a widespread and harmful invader, in northern Australia. We developed a...

Data from: Assessing the distribution of disease-bearing rodents in human-modified tropical landscapes

Serge Morand, Frédéric Bordes, Kim Blasdell, Shai Pilosof, Jean-François Cornu, Kittipong Chaisiri, Yannick Chaval, Jean-François Cosson, Julien Claude, Tristan Feyfant, Vincent Herbreteau, Stéphane Dupuy & Annelise Tran
1. We tested how habitat structure and fragmentation affect the spatial distribution of common murine rodents inhabiting human-dominated landscapes in southeast Asia. The spatial distribution patterns observed for each rodent species were then used to assess how changes in habitat structure may potentially affect the risk of several major rodent-borne diseases. 2. For this analysis, we used an extensive geo-referenced database containing details of rodents trapped from seven sites in Thailand, Cambodia and Lao PDR....

Data from: Habitat fragmentation alters the properties of a host-parasite network: rodents and their helminths in South-East Asia

Frédéric Bordes, Serge Morand, Shai Pilosof, Julien Claude, Jean-François Cosson, Yannick Chaval, Alexis Ribas, Kittipong Chaisiri, Kim Blasdell, Annelise Tran, Stéphane Dupuy & Boris R. Krasnov
1. While the effects of deforestation and habitat fragmentation on parasite prevalence or richness are well investigated, host–parasite networks are still understudied despite their importance in understanding the mechanisms of these major disturbances. Because fragmentation may negatively impact species occupancy, abundance and co-occurrence, we predict a link between spatiotemporal changes in habitat and the architecture of host–parasite networks. 2. For this, we used an extensive data set on 16 rodent species and 29 helminth species...

Data from: Forecasting potential emergence of zoonotic diseases in Southeast Asia: network analysis identifies key rodent hosts

Frédéric Bordes, Alexandre Caron, Kim Blasdell, Michel De Garine-Wichatitsky & Serge Morand
1. Within complex ecological systems, identifying animal species likely to play a key role in the emergence of infectious zoonotic diseases remains a major challenge. One approach consists of using information on current ecological and parasitological similarities among host species in order to predict the most likely pathways for future pathogen spillover. 2. Using field data acquired from 15 sympatric rodent species in various habitats in Thailand, Cambodia and Laos, we built networks based on...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    1
  • 2016
    1
  • 2015
    2

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Australian Animal Health Laboratory
    4
  • Mahidol University
    3
  • Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
    2
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    1
  • Montpellier SupAgro
    1
  • University of Zimbabwe
    1
  • University of Montpellier
    1