49 Works

Data from: Reef fish functional traits evolve fastest at trophic extremes

Samuel R. Borstein, James A. Fordyce, Brian C. O'Meara, Peter C. Wainwright & Matthew D. McGee
Trophic ecology is thought to exert a profound influence on biodiversity, but the specifics of the process are rarely examined at large spatial and evolutionary scales. We investigate how trophic position and diet breadth influence functional trait evolution in one of the most species-rich and complex vertebrate assemblages, coral reef fishes, within a large-scale phylogenetic framework. We show that, in contrast with established theory, functional traits evolve fastest in trophic specialists with narrow diet breadths...

Data from: Quantifying the relative contributions of the X chromosome, autosomes, and mitochondrial genome to local adaptation

Clementine Lasne, Belinda Van Heerwaarden, Carla M Sgro & Tim Connallon
During local adaptation with gene flow, some regions of the genome are inherently more responsive to selection than others. Recent theory predicts that X-linked genes should disproportionately contribute to local adaptation relative to other genomic regions, yet this prediction remains to be tested. We carried out a multi-generation crossing scheme, using two cline-end populations of Drosophila melanogaster, to estimate the relative contributions of the X chromosome, autosomes and mitochondrial genome to adaptive divergence in four...

Data from: A widespread thermodynamic effect, but maintenance of biological rates through space across life’s major domains

Jesper G. Sørensen, Craig R. White, Grant A. Duffy & Steven L. Chown
For over a century, the hypothesis of temperature compensation, the maintenance of similar biological rates in species from different thermal environments, has remained controversial. An alternative idea, that fitness is greater at higher temperatures (the thermodynamic effect), has gained increasing traction. This alternative hypothesis is also being used to understand large-scale biodiversity responses to environmental change. Yet evidence in favour of each of these contrasting hypotheses continues to emerge. In consequence, the fundamental nature of...

Data from: Linking life-history theory and metabolic theory explains the offspring size-temperature relationship

Amanda K. Pettersen, Craig R. White, Robert J. Bryson-Richardson & Dustin J. Marshall
Temperature often affects maternal investment in offspring. Across and within species, mothers in colder environments generally produce larger offspring than mothers in warmer environments, but the underlying drivers of this relationship remain unresolved. We formally evaluated the ubiquity of the temperature-offspring size relationship and found strong support for a negative relationship across a wide variety of ectotherms. We then tested an explanation for this relationship that formally links life-history and metabolic theories. We estimated the...

Data from: Masculinisation of gene expression is associated with male quality in Drosophila melanogaster

Rebecca Dean, Camille Hammer, Vanessa Higham & Damian K. Dowling
The signature of sexual selection has been revealed through the study of differences in patterns of genome-wide gene expression, both between the sexes and between alternative reproductive morphs within a single sex. What remains unclear, however, is whether differences in gene expression patterns between individuals of a given sex consistently map to variation in individual quality. Such a pattern, particularly if found in males, would provide unambiguous evidence that the phenotypic response to sexual selection...

Data from: Penguin ectoparasite panmixia suggests extensive host movement within a colony

Katherine L. Moon, Ceridwen I. Fraser, Steven L. Chown & Angela McGaughran
Parasite population structure can be used to infer fine-scale movement in host species. Many penguin species form large social colonies, and are highly philopatric, returning to the same nest or burrow, along the same route, after each trip to sea. Within a colony, however, the local abundance, physical similarity, and nocturnal habits of penguins hinder the observation of fine-scale movements. To determine the extent of movement and interaction of penguins within colonies, a genotyping by...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in species composition constrains plant community responses to herbivory and fertilization

Dorothee Hodapp, Elizabeth T. Borer, W. Stanley Harpole, Eric M. Lind, Eric W. Seabloom, Peter B. Adler, Juan Alberti, Carlos A. Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Marc Cadotte, Elsa E. Cleland, Scott Collins, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Oscar Iribarne, Johannes M.H. Knops, Rebecca L. McCulley, Andrew MacDougall, Joslin L. Moore, John W. Morgan, Brent Mortensen, Kimberly J. La Pierre … & Johannes M. H. Knops
Environmental change can result in substantial shifts in community composition. The associated immigration and extinction events are likely constrained by the spatial distribution of species. Still, studies on environmental change typically quantify biotic responses at single spatial (time series within a single plot) or temporal (spatial beta-diversity at single time points) scales, ignoring their potential interdependence. Here, we use data from a global network of grassland experiments to determine how turnover responses to two major...

Data from: Adaptation to reef habitats through selection on the coral animal and its associated microbiome

Madeleine J.H. Van Oppen, Pim Bongaerts, Pedro Frade, Lesa M. Peplow, Sarah E. Boyd, Hieu T. Nim, Line K. Bay & Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen
Spatially adjacent habitats on coral reefs can represent highly distinct environments, often harbouring different coral communities. Yet, certain coral species thrive across divergent environments. It is unknown whether the forces of selection are sufficiently strong to overcome the counteracting effects of the typically high gene flow over short distances, and for local adaptation to occur. We screened the coral genome (using restriction-site-associated sequencing [RAD-seq]), and characterized both the dinoflagellate photosymbiont and tissue-associated prokaryote microbiomes (using...

Data from: New small-bodied ornithopods (Dinosauria, Neornithischia) from the Early Cretaceous Wonthaggi Formation (Strzelecki Group) of the Australian-Antarctic rift system, with revision of Qantassaurus intrepidus Rich and Vickers-Rich, 1999

Matthew C. Herne, Jay P. Nair, Alistair R. Evans & Alan M. Tait
The Flat Rocks locality in the Wonthaggi Formation (Strzelecki Group) of the Gippsland Basin, southeastern Australia, hosts fossils of a late Barremian vertebrate fauna that inhabited the ancient rift between Australia and Antarctica. Known from its dentary, Qantassaurus intrepidus Rich and Vickers-Rich, 1999 has been the only dinosaur named from this locality. However, the plethora of vertebrate fossils collected from Flat Rocks suggests that further dinosaurs await discovery. From this locality, we name a new...

Data from: An androgenic endocrine disruptor alters male mating behaviour in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata)

Michael G. Bertram, Minna Saaristo, Tiarne E. Ecker, John B. Baumgartner, Bob B.M. Wong & Bob B M Wong
Hormonally active chemical pollution threatens human and wildlife populations globally. However, despite the well-established capacity of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) to alter reproductive traits, relatively few studies have examined the impacts of EDCs on mechanisms of sexual selection. This study investigated the effects of short-term exposure to an environmentally realistic level of 17β-trenbolone—a potent anabolic steroid used in livestock production worldwide—on male mate preference, reproductive behaviour and morphology in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata). Male guppies prefer...

Data from: From ornament to armament or loss of function? Breeding plumage acquisition in a genetically monogamous bird

Marie Fan, Niki Teunissen, Michelle L. Hall, Nataly Hidalgo Aranzamendi, Sjouke A. Kingma, Michael Roast, Kaspar Delhey & Anne Peters
1. The evolution of conspicuous male traits is thought to be driven by female mate choice or male-male competition. These two mechanisms are often viewed as distinct processes, with most studies focusing on female choice. 2. However, both mechanisms of sexual selection can act simultaneously on the same trait (i.e. dual function) and/or interact in a synergistic or conflicting way. Dual function-traits are commonly assumed to originate through male-male competition before being used in female...

Data from: Heat tolerance is more variable than cold tolerance across species of Iberian lizards after controlling for intraspecific variation

Salvador Herrando-Pérez, Camila Monasterio, Wouter Beukema, Verónica Gomes, Francisco Gomes Ferri-Yáñez, Josabel Belliure, Steven L. Chown, Lauren B Buckley, David R. Vieites & Miguel B. Araújo
The widespread observation that heat tolerance is less variable than cold tolerance (‘cold-tolerance asymmetry’) leads to the prediction that species exposed to temperatures near their thermal maxima should have reduced evolutionary potential for adapting to climate warming. However, the prediction is largely supported by species-level global studies based on single estimates of both physiological metrics per taxon. We ask if cold-tolerance asymmetry holds for Iberian lizards after accounting for intraspecific variation in critical thermal maxima...

Data from: Evidence for lower plasticity in CTMAX at warmer developmental temperatures

Vanessa Kellermann & Carla M. Sgro
Understanding the capacity for different species to reduce their susceptibility to climate change via phenotypic plasticity is essential for accurately predicting species extinction risk. The climatic variability hypothesis suggests that spatial and temporal variation in climatic variables should select for more plastic phenotypes. However, empirical support for this hypothesis is limited. Here we examine the capacity for ten Drosophila species to increase their critical thermal maxima (CTMAX) through developmental acclimation and/or adult heat hardening. Using...

Data from: Behavioural syndromes vary among geographically distinct populations in a reptile

Marcus Michelangeli, David G. Chapple, Celine T. Goulet, Michael G. Bertram, Bob B.M. Wong & Bob B M Wong
A key goal in the study of animal personalities is to determine their adaptive potential and importance for behavioural evolution. Behavioural syndromes are evolutionarily intriguing because they suggest that an adaptive change in one behaviour requires a concomitant shift in another. Within species, behavioural syndromes might be evolutionarily constrained by intrinsic mechanisms that restrict behaviours from evolving independently. Alternatively, behavioural correlations might easily be decoupled over short evolutionary time-scales due to variation in selective pressures...

Data from: The leading-edge vortex on a rotating wing changes markedly beyond a certain central body size

Shantanu S. Bhat, Jisheng Zhao, John Sheridan, Kerry Hourigan & Mark C. Thompson
Stable attachment of a leading-edge vortex (LEV) plays a key role in generating the high lift on rotating wings with a central body. The central body-size can affect the LEV structure broadly in two ways. First, an overall change in the size changes the Reynolds number, which is known to have an influence on the LEV structure. Second, it may affect the Coriolis acceleration acting across the wing, depending on the wing-offset from the axis...

Data from: Y chromosome sequences reveal a short Beringian Standstill, rapid expansion, and early population structure of Native American founders

Thomaz Pinotti, Susana Revollo, Cézar Paz-Y-Miño, Ricardo Fujita, Fabrício Rodrigues Santos, Chris Tyler-Smith, Toomas Kivisild, Qasim Ayub, Anders Bergström, Yali Xue, Cinthia Cuellar, Dominique Ohasi, Daniela R. Lacerda, Marilza S. Jota, José E. Santos & Arne Solli
The Americas were the last inhabitable continents to be occupied by humans, with a growing multidisciplinary consensus for entry 15-25 thousand years ago (kya) from northeast Asia via the former Beringia land bridge. Autosomal DNA analyses have dated the separation of Native American ancestors from the Asian gene pool to 23 kya or later, and mtDNA analyses to ~25 kya, followed by isolation (‘Beringian Standstill’) for 2.4-9 ky and then a rapid expansion throughout the...

Data from: Cell size, photosynthesis and the package effect: an artificial selection approach

Martino E. Malerba, Maria M. Palacios, Yussi M. Palacios Delgado, John Beardall & Dustin J. Marshall
Cell size correlates with most traits among phytoplankton species. Theory predicts that larger cells should show poorer photosynthetic performance, perhaps due to reduced intracellular self‐shading (i.e. package effect). Yet current theory relies heavily on interspecific correlational approaches and causal relationships between size and photosynthetic machinery have remained untested. As a more direct test, we applied 250 generations of artificial selection (c. 20 months) to evolve the green microalga Dunaliella teriolecta (Chlorophyta) toward different mean cell...

Data from: Drones count wildlife more accurately and precisely than humans

Jarrod C. Hodgson, Rowan Mott, Shane M. Baylis, Trung T. Pham, Simon Wotherspoon, Adam D. Kilpatrick, Ramesh Raja Segaran, Ian Reid, Aleks Terauds & Lian Pin Koh
Knowing how many individuals are in a wildlife population allows informed management decisions to be made. Ecologists are increasingly using technologies, such as remotely piloted aircraft (RPA; commonly known as “drones,” unmanned aerial systems or unmanned aerial vehicles), for wildlife monitoring applications. Although RPA are widely touted as a cost-effective way to collect high-quality wildlife population data, the validity of these claims is unclear. Using life-sized, replica seabird colonies containing a known number of fake...

Data from: GloPL, a global data base on pollen limitation of plant reproduction

Joanne. M. Bennett, Janette. A. Steets, Jean. H. Burns, Walter Durka, Jana. C. Vamosi, Gerardo Arceo-Gómez, Martin Burd, Laura. A. Burkle, Allan. G Ellis, Leandro Freitas, Junmin Li, James. G. Rodger, Marina Wolowski, Jing Xia, Tia-Lynn Ashman & Tiffany. M. Knight
Plant reproduction relies on transfer of pollen from anthers to stigmas, and the majority of flowering plants depend on biotic or abiotic agents for this transfer. A key metric for characterizing if pollen receipt is insufficient for reproduction is pollen limitation, which is assessed by pollen supplementation experiments. In a pollen supplementation experiment, fruit or seed production by flowers exposed to natural pollination is compared to that following hand pollination either by pollen supplementation (i.e....

Data from: Leaf nutrients, not specific leaf area, are consistent indicators of elevated nutrient inputs

Jennifer Firn, James M. McGree, Eric Harvey, Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Martin Schütz, Yvonne M. Buckley, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Andrew M. MacDougall, Suzanne M. Prober, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren L. Sullivan, Erica Porter, Emma Ladouceur, Charlotte Allen, Karine H. Moromizato, John W. Morgan, W. Stanley Harpole, Yann Hautier, Nico Eisenhauer, Justin P. Wright, Peter B. Adler, Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker … & Anita C. Risch
Leaf traits are frequently measured in ecology to provide a ‘common currency’ for predicting how anthropogenic pressures impact ecosystem function. Here, we test whether leaf traits consistently respond to experimental treatments across 27 globally distributed grassland sites across 4 continents. We find that specific leaf area (leaf area per unit mass)—a commonly measured morphological trait inferring shifts between plant growth strategies—did not respond to up to four years of soil nutrient additions. Leaf nitrogen, phosphorus...

Data from: Antagonistic pleiotropy in species with separate sexes, and the maintenance of genetic variation in life-history traits and fitness

Felix Zajitschek & Tim Connallon
Antagonistic pleiotropy (AP) – where alleles of a gene increase some components of fitness at a cost to others – can generate balancing selection, and contribute to the maintenance of genetic variation in fitness traits, such as survival, fecundity, fertility, and mate competition. Previous theory suggests that AP is unlikely to maintain variation unless antagonistic selection is strong, or AP alleles exhibit pronounced differences in genetic dominance between the affected traits. We show that conditions...

Data from: Feeding ecology underlies the evolution of cichlid jaw mobility

Christopher M. Martinez, Matthew David McGee, Samuel Robert Borstein & Peter C. Wainwright
The fish feeding apparatus is among the most diverse functional systems in vertebrates. While morphological and mechanical variation of feeding systems are well studied, we know far less about the diversity of the motions that they produce. We explored patterns of feeding movements in African cichlids from Lakes Malawi and Tanganyika, asking whether the degree of kinesis is associated with dietary habits of species. We used geometric morphometrics to measure feeding kinesis as trajectories of...

Data from: The effect of pollen limitation on the evolution of mating system and seed size in hermaphroditic plants

Qiaoqiao Huang & Martin Burd
Pollen limitation, when inadequate pollen receipt results in a plant setting fewer seeds and fruits, can reduce plant reproductive success and promote the evolution of self-fertilization as a mechanism of reproductive assurance. However, the effect of pollen limitation on the joint evolution of mating system and seed size is not known. Using an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) resource allocation model, we show that where moderate pollen limitation and strong inbreeding depression select for complete outcrossing,...

Data from: Threat sensitive adjustment of aggression by males and females in a biparental cichlid

Will Sowersby, Topi K. Lehtonen, Bob B.M. Wong & Bob B M Wong
Defending offspring provides fitness benefits to parents, but is costly. To moderate costs, parents should adjust aggressive responses to the threat posed by different species entering their territory. However, few studies have experimentally tested behavioral adjustments in response to the threat posed by different types of intruders, particularly in the field, and in environments with an array of heterospecific intruders. Here, using a biparental cichlid, the poor man’s tropheus (Hypsophrys nematopus), we investigated whether males...

Data from: The role of geospatial hotspots in the spatial spread of tuberculosis in rural Ethiopia: a mathematical modelling

Debebe Shaweno, James M. Trauer, Justin T. Denholm & Emma S. McBryde
Geospatial tuberculosis hotspots are hubs of TB transmission both within and across community groups. We aimed to quantify the extent to which these hotspots account for the spatial spread of TB in a high-burden setting. We developed spatially coupled models to quantify the spread of TB from geographic hotspots to distant regions in rural Ethiopia. The population was divided into three ‘patches’ based on their proximity to transmission hotspots, namely hotspots, adjacent regions and remote...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    49

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    49

Affiliations

  • Monash University
    49
  • University of Melbourne
    7
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    3
  • University of Washington
    3
  • University of Groningen
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • University of Guelph
    3
  • La Trobe University
    3
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • University of Newcastle Australia
    2