23 Works

No evidence for an adaptive role of early molt into breeding plumage in a female fairy-wren

Sergio Nolazco, Michelle L. Hall, Sjouke A. Kingma, Kaspar Delhey & Anne Peters
The evolution of ornaments as sexually selected signals is well understood in males, but female ornamentation remains understudied. Fairy-wrens offer an excellent model system, given their complex social structure and mating systems, and the diversity of female ornamentation. We investigated whether early molt into ornamental breeding plumage plays an adaptive role in females of the monogamous purple-crowned fairy-wren Malurus coronatus, the only fairy-wren known to have female seasonal plumage. Using six years of monitoring, we...

Data from: Low food availability during gestation enhances offspring post-natal growth, but reduces survival, in a viviparous lizard

Thomas Botterill-James, Kirke L. Munch, Ben Halliwell, David G. Chapple, Michael G. Gardner, Erik Wapstra & Geoffrey M. While
The environment experienced by a mother can have profound effects on the fitness of her offspring (i.e., maternal effects). Maternal effects can be adaptive when the developmental environments experienced by offspring promote phenotypes that provide fitness benefits either via matching offspring phenotype to the post-developmental environment (also known as anticipatory maternal effects) or through direct effects on offspring growth and survival. We tested these hypotheses in a viviparous lizard using a factorial experimental design in...

Data from: An R package and online resource for macroevolutionary studies using the ray-finned fish tree of life

Jonathan Chang, Daniel L. Rabosky, Stephen A. Smith & Michael E. Alfaro
1. Comprehensive, time-scaled phylogenies provide a critical resource for many questions in ecology, evolution, and biodiversity. Methodological advances have increased the breadth of taxonomic coverage in phylogenetic data; however, accessing and reusing these data remain challenging. 2. We introduce the Fish Tree of Life website and associated R package fishtree to provide convenient access to sequences, phylogenies, fossil calibrations, and diversification rate estimates for the most diverse group of vertebrate organisms, the ray-finned fishes. The...

Data from: Estimating diversification rates on incompletely-sampled phylogenies: theoretical concerns and practical solutions

Jonathan Chang, Daniel L. Rabosky & Michael E. Alfaro
Molecular phylogenies are a key source of information about the tempo and mode of species diversification. However, most empirical phylogenies do not contain representatives of all species, such that diversification rates are typically estimated from incompletely sampled data. Most researchers recognize that incomplete sampling can lead to biased rate estimates, but the statistical properties of methods for accommodating incomplete sampling remain poorly known. In this point of view, we demonstrate theoretical concerns with the widespread...

Data from: Profile of and risk factors for post-stroke cognitive impairment in diverse ethno-regional groups

Jessica W Lo, John D Crawford, David W Desmond, Olivier Godefroy, Hanna Jokinen, Simin Mahinrad, Hee-Joon Bae, Sebastian Köhler, Elles Douven, Julie Staals, Christopher Chen, Xin Xu, Eddie J Chong, Rufus O Akinyemi, Rajesh N Kalaria, Adesola Ogunniyi, Mélanie Barbay, Martine Roussel, Byung-Chul Lee, Velandai K Srikanth, Christopher Moran, Nagaendran Kandiah, Russell J Chander, Behnam Sabayan, J. Wouter Jukema … & Perminder S Sachdev
OBJECTIVE: To address the variability in prevalence estimates and inconsistencies in potential risk factors for post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) using a standardised approach and individual participant data (IPD) from international cohorts in the STROKOG consortium. METHODS: We harmonised data from thirteen studies based in eight countries. Neuropsychological test scores 2 to 6 months after stroke or TIA and appropriate normative data were used to calculate standardised cognitive domain scores. Domain-specific impairment was based on percentile...

Anti-tumour effects of red blood cell membrane-camouflaged black phosphorous quantum dots combined with chemotherapy and anti-inflammatory therapy

Xueyuan Huang, Bin Wu, Jian Li, Yinghui Shang, Wansong Chen, Xinmin Nie & Rong Gui
Conventional anti-tumour chemotherapy is facing the challenges of poor specificity, high toxicity and drug resistance. Tumour microenvironment (TME) plays a critical role in tumour development and drug resistance. To address this problem, we constructed a novel anti-tumour nanoparticle platform RBC@BPQDs-DOX/KIR, black phosphorus nanoparticle quantum dots (BPQDs) with one of the chemotherapeutics (doxorubicin, DOX) and an anti-inflammatory traditional Chinese medicine active component (Kirenol, KIR). Red blood cell membrane (RBCm) vesicles were used as the shell to...

Data from: More salt, please: global patterns, responses, and impacts of foliar sodium in grasslands

Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric M. Lind, Jennifer Firn, Eric W. Seabloom, T. Michael Anderson, Elizabeth S. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Andrew S. MacDougall, Joslin L. Moore, Anita C. Risch, Martin Schutz & Carly J. Stevens
Sodium is unique among abundant elemental nutrients, because most plant species do not require it for growth or development, whereas animals physiologically require sodium. Foliar sodium influences consumption rates by animals and can structure herbivores across landscapes. We quantified foliar sodium in 201 locally abundant, herbaceous species representing 32 families and, at 26 sites on four continents, experimentally manipulated vertebrate herbivores and elemental nutrients to determine their effect on foliar sodium. Foliar sodium varied taxonomically...

Data from: Comparing thermal performance curves across traits: how consistent are they?

Vanessa Kellermann, Steven L. Chown, Mads Fristrup Schou, Ian Aitkenhead, Charlene Janion-Scheepers, Allannah Clemson, Marina Telonis Scott & Carla M. Sgro
Thermal performance curves (TPCs) are intended to approximate the relationship between temperature and fitness, and are commonly integrated into species distributional models for understanding climate change responses. However, TPCs may vary across traits because selection and environmental sensitivity (plasticity) differ across traits or because the timing and duration of the temperature exposure, here termed time-scale, may alter trait variation. Yet the extent to which TPCs vary temporally and across traits is rarely considered in assessments...

Data from: Combining correlative and mechanistic niche models with human activity data to elucidate the invasive potential of a sub-Antarctic insect

Luis Pertierra, Pedro Aragón, Miguel Olalla-Tarraga, Greta Vega, Grant Duffy, Pete Convey, Scott Hayward, Kevin Hughes & Jesamine Bartlett
Aim Correlative Species Distribution Models (SDMs) are subject to substantial spatio-temporal limitations when historical occurrence records of data-poor species provide incomplete and outdated information for niche modelling. Complementary mechanistic modelling techniques can, therefore, offer a valuable contribution to underpin more physiologically-informed predictions of biological invasions, the risk of which is often exacerbated by climate change. In this study we integrate physiological and human pressure data to address the uncertainties and limitations of correlative SDMs and...

Testing the drivers of the temperature-size covariance using artificial selection

Martino E. Malerba & Dustin J. Marshall
Body size often declines with increasing temperature. Although there is ample evidence for this effect to be adaptive, it remains unclear whether size shrinking at warmer temperatures is driven by specific properties of being smaller (e.g. surface to volume ratio) or by traits that are correlated with size (e.g. metabolism, growth). We used 290 generations (22 months) of artificial selection on a unicellular phytoplankton species to evolve a 13-fold difference in volume between small-selected and...

Data from: Physical and physiological impacts of ocean warming alter phenotypic selection on sperm morphology

Evatt Chirgwin
Global warming may threaten fertility, which is a key component of individual fitness and vital for population persistence. For males, fertility relies on the ability of sperm to collide and fuse with eggs; consequently, sperm morphology is predicted to be a prime target of selection owing to its effects on male function. In aquatic environments, warming will expose gametes of external fertilisers to the physiological effects of higher temperature and the physical effects of lower...

Effects of model resolution, physics, and coupling on Southern Hemisphere storm tracks in CESM1.3

Dongxia Yang & Gerald Meehl
Two high-resolution versions of a coupled Earth system model (CESM1.3: 0.25˚-atmosphere, 1˚-ocean; CESM1.1: 0.25˚-atmosphere, 0.1˚-ocean) are compared to the standard resolution CESM1.1 and CESM1.3 (1˚-atmosphere, 1˚-ocean). The CESM1.3 versions are documented, and the consequences of model resolution, air-sea coupling, and physics in the atmospheric models are studied with regards to storm tracks in the Southern Hemisphere as represented by 850 hPa eddy kinetic energy. Increasing the resolution from 1˚ to 0.25˚ in the atmosphere (same...

Delivery of mesenchymal stem cells-derived extracellular vesicles with enriched miR-185 inhibits progression of OPMD

Lin Wang, Panpan Yin, Jiaqi Wang, Yuanyuan Wang, Zheng Sun, Yu Zhou & Xiaobing Guan
Oral leukoplakia is one of the most common oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) and its malignant transformation to oral cancer is highly associated with chronic inflammation. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) or exosome-delivered microRNAs modulate inflammatory responses and alleviate irritations that predisposes to cancer. We previously reported that microRNA-185 (miR-185) was significantly decreased in the buccal tissue of patients with oral cancer. In this study, we utilized genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived EVs with high...

Anti-tumour effects of red blood cell membrane-camouflaged black phosphorous quantum dots combined with chemotherapy and anti-inflammatory therapy

Xueyuan Huang, Bin Wu, Jian Li, Yinghui Shang, Wansong Chen, Xinmin Nie & Rong Gui
Conventional anti-tumour chemotherapy is facing the challenges of poor specificity, high toxicity and drug resistance. Tumour microenvironment (TME) plays a critical role in tumour development and drug resistance. To address this problem, we constructed a novel anti-tumour nanoparticle platform RBC@BPQDs-DOX/KIR, black phosphorus nanoparticle quantum dots (BPQDs) with one of the chemotherapeutics (doxorubicin, DOX) and an anti-inflammatory traditional Chinese medicine active component (Kirenol, KIR). Red blood cell membrane (RBCm) vesicles were used as the shell to...

Data from: Host sexual dimorphism affects the outcome of within-host pathogen competition

Stephen A.Y. Gipson, Luis Jimenez & Matthew D. Hall
Natural infections often consist of multiple pathogens of the same or different species. When co-infections occur, pathogens compete for access to host resources and fitness is determined by how well a pathogen can reproduce compared to its competitors. Yet not all hosts provide the same resource pool. Males and females, in particular, commonly vary in both their acquisition of resources and investment in immunity, but their ability to modify any competition between different pathogens remains...

Impacts of caudal autotomy on personality

Marcus Michelangeli, Brooke Melki-Wegner, Kate Laskowski, Bob Wong & David Chapple
Caudal autotomy, the voluntary shedding of a tail, is a last-ditch strategy used by many lizard species to escape from predators. There are several costs associated with caudal autotomy that may cause lizards to make behavioral adjustments during tail regeneration. These behavioral changes may be dependent upon individual differences in response to autotomy (e.g. trait or state-dependent differences) and/or the degree of tail loss, as many lizards have the capacity to only partially shed their...

Revealing the colourful side of birds: spatial distribution of conspicuous plumage colours on the body of Australian birds

Kaspar Delhey
In many species of birds, different body parts often display very different colours. This spatial distribution of coloured plumage patches may be determined, among other factors, by the balance between being cryptic to predators, and conspicuous to intended receivers. If this is the case, ventral and anterior body parts in birds –which are less visible to predators but more prominent to conspecifics– should present more conspicuous and sexually dichromatic plumage colours. Here I test these...

Data from: The role of spore size in the global pattern of co-occurrence among Selaginella species

Sofia Margaroni, Kurt B. Petersen, Roslyn Gleadow & Martin Burd
Aim: Separation of regeneration niches may promote coexistence among closely related plant species, but there is little evidence that regeneration traits affect species ranges at large geographic scales. Here we address patterns of co-occurrence within the genus Selaginella, an ancient lineage of free-sporing, heterosporous, vascular plants. Specifically, we ask whether differences between species in spore size are associated with the extent of overlap in their geographic ranges, a measure of opportunity for ecological interaction. Taxon:...

Data from: Context-dependent induction of allelopathy in plants under competition

Akane Uesugi, Robert Johnson & Andre Kessler
Some plants use allelopathy to compete against neighbouring plants, and the ability to induce allelopathic compound production in response to competition is hypothesized to be adaptive, as plants can save costs of metabolite production in the absence of competitors. However, whether plants induce allelopathy has rarely been explored so far. We studied the inducibility of polyacetylenes—putative allelopathic compounds in Solidago altissima—in response to competition. Polyacetylenes were found in natural soil surrounding S. altissima patches within...

Mother’s curse and indirect genetic effects: do males matter to mitochondrial genome evolution?

Thomas Keaney, Heidi Wong, Damian Dowling, Theresa Jones & Luke Holman
Maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was originally thought to prevent any response to selection on male phenotypic variation attributable to mtDNA, resulting in a male-biased mtDNA mutation load (‘mother’s curse’). However, the theory underpinning this claim implicitly assumes that a male’s mtDNA has no effect on the fitness of females he comes into contact with. If such ‘mitochondrially-encoded indirect genetics effects’ (mtIGEs) do in fact exist, and there is relatedness between the mitochondrial genomes...

HIF-1α promotes the keloid development through the activation of TGF-β/Smad and TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB pathways

Rui Lei, Jian Li, Feng Liu, Weihan Li, Shizhen Zhang, Yang Wang, Xi Chu & Jinghong Xu
A keloid is defined as an overgrowth of the dense fibrous tissues that form around a wound. Since they destroy the vascular network, keloid tissues often exhibit anoxic conditions. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is a core factor that mediates hypoxia stress responses and regulates the hypoxic cellular and biological behaviors. In this study, we found that the expression level of HIF-1α in keloid tissue was significantly higher than that in the normal skin tissue. Hypoxia-induced HIF-1α...

Anti-tumour effects of red blood cell membrane-camouflaged black phosphorous quantum dots combined with chemotherapy and anti-inflammatory therapy

Xueyuan Huang, Bin Wu, Jian Li, Yinghui Shang, Wansong Chen, Xinming Nie & Rong Gui
Conventional anti-tumour chemotherapy is facing the challenges of poor specificity, high toxicity and drug resistance. Tumour microenvironment (TME) plays a critical role in tumour development and drug resistance. To address this problem, we constructed a novel anti-tumour nanoparticle platform RBC@BPQDs-DOX/KIR, black phosphorus nanoparticle quantum dots (BPQDs) with one of the chemotherapeutics (doxorubicin, DOX) and an anti-inflammatory traditional Chinese medicine active component (Kirenol, KIR). Red blood cell membrane (RBCm) vesicles were used as the shell to...

Delivery of mesenchymal stem cells-derived extracellular vesicles with enriched miR-185 inhibits progression of OPMD

Lin Wang, Panpan Yin, Jiaqi Wang, Yuanyuan Wang, Zheng Sun, Yu Zhou & Xiaobing Guan
Oral leukoplakia is one of the most common oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) and its malignant transformation to oral cancer is highly associated with chronic inflammation. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) or exosome-delivered microRNAs modulate inflammatory responses and alleviate irritations that predisposes to cancer. We previously reported that microRNA-185 (miR-185) was significantly decreased in the buccal tissue of patients with oral cancer. In this study, we utilized genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived EVs with high...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    23

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    23

Affiliations

  • Monash University
    23
  • Jilin University
    6
  • Xiamen University
    6
  • Peking University Cancer Hospital
    6
  • Huazhong University of Science and Technology
    6
  • Guangzhou Medical University
    6
  • Fudan University
    6
  • Shandong University
    6
  • Shanghai Jiao Tong University
    6
  • Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College
    6