4 Works

Data from: Heterogeneity in local density allows a positive evolutionary relationship between self-fertilisation and dispersal

James Rodger, Pietro Landi, Cang Hui & James G. Rodger
Despite empirical evidence for a positive relationship between dispersal and self-fertilisation (selfing), theoretical work predicts that these traits should always be negatively correlated, and the Good Coloniser Syndrome of high dispersal and selfing (Cf. Baker’s Law) should not evolve. Critically, previous work assumes that adult density is spatiotemporally homogeneous, so selfing results in identical offspring production for all patches, eliminating the benefit of dispersal for escaping from local resource competition. We investigate the joint evolution...

Data from: Emergence of weak‐intransitive competition through adaptive diversification and eco‐evolutionary feedbacks

Laure Gallien, Pietro Landi, Cang Hui & David M. Richardson
Indirect biotic interactions—such as intransitive competition—are increasingly recognized as being important in shaping ecological patterns in natural systems. Over long time‐scales, such indirect interactions may affect the evolution of species phenotypes, which in turn can modify these interactions, thereby begetting eco‐evolutionary feedbacks. If indirect intransitive interactions can emerge in situ during lineage diversification, they could profoundly affect species’ phenotypic diversity, temporal stability, and subsequent diversification rates. We address these questions by investigating the conditions under...

Data from: The ghost of introduction past: spatial and temporal variability in the genetic diversity of invasive smallmouth bass

Genevieve Diedericks, Romina Henriques, Sophie Von Der Heyden, Olaf Weyl & Cang Hui
Understanding the demographic history of introduced populations is essential for unravelling their invasive potential and adaptability to a novel environment. To this end, levels of genetic diversity within the native and invasive range of a species are often compared. Most studies, however, focus solely on contemporary samples, relying heavily on the premise that the historic population structure within the native range has been maintained over time. Here, we assess this assumption by conducting a three-way...

Data from: Proximate causes of variation in dermal armour: insights from armadillo lizards

Chris Broeckhoven, P. L. Le Fras N. Mouton & Cang Hui
Although it is widely assumed that body armour in animals evolved to thwart predator attacks, assessing the role that predators may play in shaping defensive morphologies has proven to be difficult. Recent studies suggest that body armour might be influenced by additional factors besides predation, and/or even by sexual selection. We investigated variation in dermal armour in 13 populations of armadillo lizards (Ouroborus cataphractus), spanning the entire distribution range of the species. We obtained thickness...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • African Institute for Mathematical Sciences
    4
  • Stellenbosch University
    4
  • University of Antwerp
    1
  • University of Lausanne
    1
  • International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
    1
  • Technical University of Denmark
    1