11 Works

Data from: Spatial-temporal dynamics of Neotropical velvet ant (Hymenoptera: Mutillidae) communities along a forest-savanna gradient

Júlio Miguel Alvarenga, Cecília Rodrigues Vieira, Leandro Braga Godinho, Pedro Henrique Campelo, James Purser Pitts & Guarino Rinaldi Colli
Understanding how and why biological communities are organized over space and time is a major challenge and can aid biodiversity conservation in times of global changes. Herein, spatial-temporal variation in the structure of velvet ant communities was examined along a forest-savanna gradient in the Brazilian Cerrado to assess the roles of environmental filters and interspecific interactions upon community assembly. Velvet ants were sampled using 25 arrays of Y-shaped pitfall traps with drift fences for one...

Legacy of Amazonian Dark Earth soils on forest structure and species composition

EDMAR Oliveira, Ben Hur Marimon-Junior, Beatriz Marimon, José Iriarte, Paulo Morandi, Yoshi Maezumi, Denis Nogueira, Luiz Aragão, Izaias Silva & Ted Feldpausch
Aim: Amazonian forests predominantly grow on highly weathered and nutrient poor soils. Anthropogenically enriched Amazonian Dark Earths (ADE), traditionally known as Terra Preta de Índio), were formed by pre-Columbian populations. ADE soils are characterized by increased fertility and have continued to be exploited following European colonization. Here, we evaluated the legacy of land-use and soil enrichment on the composition and structure in ADE and NDE forests. Location: Eeastern and southern Amazonia Time period: Pre-Columbia -...

Leaf water potential Cerrado and Semi-decidious forest

Imma Oliveras & Halina Jaconski
Individual leaf water potentials and VPD for species along a forest-savanna gradient.

Litter decomposition rates across tropical montane and lowland forests are controlled foremost by climate

Rebecca Ostertag, Carla Restrepo, Iveren Abeim, Roxana Aragón, Michelle Ataroff, Hazel Chapman, Belen Fadrique, Grizelle González, Achim Häger, Jürgen Homeier, Luis Daniel Llambí, Rikke Reese Næsborg, Laura Nohemy Poma López, Jorge Andrés Ramirez Correa, Klara Scharnagl, Conrado Tobón, James W. Dalling, Patrick H. Martin, Iveren Abiem, Shin‐Ichiro Aiba, Esteban Alvarez‐Dávila, Augusta Y. Cueva‐Agila, Romina D. Fernández, Sybil G. Gotsch, Carlos Iñiguez‐Armijos … & Cameron B. Williams
The “hierarchy of factors” hypothesis states that decomposition rates are controlled primarily by climatic, followed by biological and soil variables. Tropical montane forests (TMF) are globally important ecosystems, yet there have been limited efforts to provide a biome-scale characterization of litter decomposition. We designed a common litter decomposition experiment replicated in 23 tropical montane sites across the Americas, Asia, and Africa and combined these results with a previous study of 23 sites in tropical lowland...

Data from: Lowland tapirs facilitate seed dispersal in degraded Amazonian forests

Lucas N. Paolucci, Rogério L. Pereira, Ludmila Rattis, Divino V. Silvério, Nubia C.S. Marques, Marcia N. Macedo & Paulo M. Brando
The forests of southeastern Amazonia are highly threatened by disturbances such as fragmentation, understory fires and extreme climatic events. Large-bodied frugivores such as the lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris) have the potential to offset this process, supporting natural forest regeneration by dispersing a variety of seeds over long distances to disturbed forests. However, we know little about their effectiveness as seed dispersers in degraded forest landscapes. Here, we investigate the seed dispersal function of lowland tapirs...

Data from: Effects of forest degradation on Amazonian ferns in a land-bridge island system as revealed by non-specialist inventories

Danielle Storck-Tonon, Gabriela Zuquim, Maíra Benchimol, Rafael Tonon & Carlos Peres
Background: Tropical deforestation and degradation worldwide have rapidly outpaced biodiversity field sampling. No study to date has assessed the effects of insular habitats induced by hydroelectric dams on Amazonian understorey plants. Fern community responses to anthropogenic effects on tropical forest islands can be efficiently revealed through simple and cheap, yet informative protocols that can be applied by non-specialists. Aims: This study seeks to both understand the drivers of fern and lycophyte assemblages on forest islands...

Data from: Reis et al. (2022). Climate and crown damage drive tree mortality in Southern Amazonian edge Forests. Journal of Ecology. DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.13849

Simone Matias Reis, Beatriz Schwantes Marimon, Adriane Esquivel-Muelbert, Ben Hur Marimon Junior, Paulo Sérgio Morandi, Fernando Elias, Edmar Almeida de Oliveira, David Galbraith, Ted R. Feldpausch, Imma Oliveras Menor, Yadvinder Malhi & Oliver L. Phillips

Data from Reis et al (2020) Causes and consequences of liana infestation in Southern Amazonia. Journal of Ecology DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.13470

Simone Matias Reis, Beatriz Schwantes Marimon, Paulo S. Morandi, Fernando Elias, Adriane Esquivel‐Muelbert, Ben Hur Marimon Junior, Sophie Fauset, Edmar Almeida de Oliveira, Geertje M.F. van der Heijden, David Galbraith, Ted R. Feldpausch & Oliver L. Phillips

Time of activity is a better predictor of the distribution of a tropical lizard than pure environmental temperatures

Gabriel Henrique De Oliveira Caetano, Juan Carlos Santos, Leandro Godinho, Vitor Cavalcante, Luisa Viegas, Pedro Campelo, Lidia Martins, Alan De Oliveira, Júlio Alvarenga, Helga Wiederhecker, Verônica De Novaes E Silva, Fernanda Werneck, Donald Miles, Guarino Colli & Barry Sinervo
Environmental temperatures influence ectotherms’ physiology and capacity to perform activities necessary for survival and reproduction. Time available to perform those activities is determined by thermal tolerances and environmental temperatures. Estimates of activity time might enhance our ability to predict suitable areas for species’ persistence in face of climate warming, compared to the exclusive use of environmental temperatures, without considering thermal tolerances. We compare the ability of environmental temperatures and estimates of activity time to predict...

Data and R-code from 'Mode of death and mortality risk factors in Amazon trees'. Nature communications. 2020

Adriane Esquivel Muelbert, Oliver L. Phillips, Roel J. W. Brienen, Sophie Fauset, Martin J. P. Sullivan, Timothy R. Baker, Kuo-Jung Chao, Ted R. Feldpausch, Emanuel Gloor, Niro Higuchi, Jeanne Houwing-Duistermaat, Jon Lloyd, Haiyan Liu, Yadvinder Malhi, Beatriz Marimon, Ben Hur Marimon Junior, Abel Monteagudo-Mendoza, Lourens Poorter, Marcos Silveira, Emilio Vilanova Torre, Esteban Alvarez Dávila, Jhon del Aguila Pasquel, Everton Almeida, Patricia Alvarez Loayza & Ana Andrade

Dataset: Local hydrological conditions influence tree diversity and composition across the Amazon basin

Manuel J. Marca-Zevallos, Gabriel M. Moulatlet, Thaiane R. Sousa, Juliana Schietti, Luiz De Souza Coelho, José Ferreira Ramos, Diogenes De Andrade Lima Filho, Iêda Leão Amaral, Francisca Dionízia De Almeida Matos, Lorena M. Rincón, Juan David Cardenas Revilla, Marcelo Petratti Pansonato, Rogerio Gribel, Edelcilio Marques Barbosa, Ires Paula De Andrade Miranda, Luiz Carlos De Matos Bonates, Juan Ernesto Guevara, Rafael P. Salomão, Leandro Valle Ferreira, Dário Dantas Do Amaral, Nigel C.A. Pitman, Corine Vriesendorp, Tim R. Baker, Roel Brienen, Marcelo De Jesus Veiga Carim … & Flávia R.C. Costa
Tree diversity and composition in Amazonia are known to be strongly determined by the water supplied by precipitation. Nevertheless, within the same climatic regime, water availability is modulated by local topography and soil characteristics (hereafter referred to as local hydrological conditions), varying from saturated and poorly drained to well-drained and potentially dry areas. While these conditions may be expected to influence species distribution, the impacts of local hydrological conditions on tree diversity and composition remain...

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Affiliations

  • Universidade do Estado de Mato Grosso
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  • University of Leeds
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  • Mato Grosso State University
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  • University of Exeter
    5
  • University of Oxford
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  • National Institute of Amazonian Research
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  • Plymouth University
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  • University of California, Berkeley
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  • Imperial College London
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  • Universidade Católica de Brasília
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