505 Works

Data from: Effects of trophy hunting leftovers on the ranging behaviour of large carnivores: a case study on spotted hyenas

Gabriele Cozzi, Luca Börger, Pascale Hutter, Daniela Abegg, Celine Beran, John Weldon McNutt & Arpat Ozgul
Human-related food resources such as garbage dumps and feeding sites have been shown to significantly influence space use, breeding success and population dynamics in a variety of animal species. In contrast, relatively little is known on the effects of unpredictable sources of food, such as carcasses discarded by hunters, on carnivore species. We evaluated the effect of elephant carcasses, mainly deriving from trophy hunting, on the ranging and feeding behavior of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta)...

Data from: Mitochondrial complementation: a possible neglected factor behind early eukaryotic sex

Anaïs Tilquin, Joshua R. Christie & Hanna Kokko
Sex is ancestral in eukaryotes. Meiotic sex differs from bacterial ways of exchanging genetic material by involving the fusion of two cells. We examine the hypothesis that fusion evolved in early eukaryotes because it was directly beneficial, rather than a passive side-effect of meiotic sex. We assume that the uptake of (proto)mitochondria into eukaryotes preceded the evolution of cell fusion, and that Muller’s ratchet operating within symbiont lineages led to the accumulation of lineage-specific sets...

Data from: Tooth occlusal morphology in the durophagous marine reptiles, Placodontia (Reptilia: Sauropterygia)

Stephanie B. Crofts, James M. Neenan, Torsten M. Scheyer & Adam P. Summers
Placodontia were a group of marine reptiles that lived in shallow nearshore environments during the Triassic. Based on tooth morphology it has been inferred that they were durophagous, but tooth morphology differs among species: placodontoid placodonts have teeth described as hemispherical, and the teeth of more highly nested taxa within the cyamodontoid placodonts have been described as flat. In contrast, the sister taxon to the placodonts, Palatodonta bleekeri, like many other marine reptiles, has tall...

Data from: Independent sources of condition dependency and multiple pathways determine a composite trait: lessons from carotenoid-based plumage colouration

Cristina Romero-Díaz, Heinz Richner, Fernando Granado-Lorencio, Barbara Tschirren, Patrick Fitze & C. Romero-Diaz
Many color ornaments are composite traits consisting of at least four components, which themselves may be more complex, determined by independent evolutionary pathways, and potentially being under different environmental control. To date, little evidence exists that several different components of color elaboration are condition-dependent and no direct evidence exists that different ornamental components are affected by different sources of variation. For example, in carotenoid-based plumage coloration, one of the best-known condition-dependent ornaments, color elaboration stems...

Data from: A microsatellite-based linkage map for song sparrows (Melospiza melodia)

Pirmin Nietlisbach, Glauco Camenisch, Thomas Bucher, Jon Slate, Lukas F. Keller & Erik Postma
Although linkage maps are important tools in evolutionary biology, their availability for wild populations is limited. The population of song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) on Mandarte Island, Canada, is among the more intensively studied wild animal populations. Its long-term pedigree data, together with extensive genetic sampling, have allowed the study of a range of questions in evolutionary biology and ecology. However, the availability of genetic markers has been limited. We here describe 191 new microsatellite loci,...

Data from: Genetic diversity and distribution patterns of diploid and polyploid hybrid water frog populations (Pelophylax esculentus complex) across Europe

Alexandra Hoffmann, Jörg Plötner, Nicolas B. M. Pruvost, Ditte G. Christiansen, Sandra Röthlisberger, Peter Mikulíček, Lukáš Choleva, Dan Cogălniceanu, István Sas-Kovács, Dmitry Shabanov, Svyatoslav Morozov-Leonov & Heinz-Ulrich Reyer
Polyploidization is a rare yet sometimes successful way for animals to rapidly create geno- and phenotypes that may colonize new habitats and quickly adapt to environmental changes. In this study, we use water frogs of the Pelophylax esculentus complex, comprising two species (Pelophylax lessonae, genotype LL; Pelophylax ridibundus, RR) and various diploid (LR) and triploid (LLR, LRR) hybrid forms, summarized as P. esculentus, as a model for studying recent hybridization and polyploidization in the context...

Data from: Individual-level trait diversity concepts and indices to comprehensively describe community change in multidimensional trait space

Simone Fontana, Owen L. Petchey & Francesco Pomati
Global environmental change can influence ecosystem processes directly or through changes in the trait composition of natural communities. Traits are individual-level features of organisms, and theory predicts that diversity in traits should relate to ecosystem processes. Validated indices that account for both intra- and interspecific trait variation in multidimensional trait space are lacking. In this article, we highlight how an individual-level perspective requires new concepts for trait diversity (TD) and we validate a set of...

Data from: Novel opsin gene variation in large-bodied, diurnal lemurs

Rachel L. Jacobs, Tammie S. MacFie, Amanda N. Spriggs, Andrea L. Baden, Toni Lyn Morelli, Mitchell T. Irwin, Richard R. Lawler, Jennifer Pastorini, Mireya Mayor, Runhua Lei, Ryan Culligan, Melissa T. R. Hawkins, Peter M. Kappeler, Patricia C. Wright, Edward E. Louis, Nicholas I. Mundy & Brenda J. Bradley
Some primate populations include both trichromatic and dichromatic (red–green colour blind) individuals due to allelic variation at the X-linked opsin locus. This polymorphic trichromacy is well described in day-active New World monkeys. Less is known about colour vision in Malagasy lemurs, but, unlike New World monkeys, only some day-active lemurs are polymorphic, while others are dichromatic. The evolutionary pressures underlying these differences in lemurs are unknown, but aspects of species ecology, including variation in activity...

Data from: Dispersal in dendritic networks: ecological consequences on the spatial distribution of population densities

Florian Altermatt & Emanuel A. Fronhofer
1. Understanding the consequences of spatial structure on ecological dynamics is a central theme in ecology. Recently, research has recognized the relevance of river and river-analogue network structures, because these systems are not only highly diverse but also rapidly changing due to habitat modifications or species invasions. 2. Much of the previous work on ecological and evolutionary dynamics in metapopulations and metacommunities in dendritic river networks has been either using comparative approaches or was purely...

Data from: Pollinator adaptation and the evolution of floral nectar sugar composition

Stefan Abrahamczyk, Michael Kessler, Daniel Hanley, Dirk N. Karger, Matthias P. J. Müller, Anina C. Knauer, Felix Keller, Michael Schwerdtfeger & Aelys M. Humphreys
A longstanding debate concerns whether nectar sugar composition evolves as an adaptation to pollinator dietary requirements or whether it is ‘phylogenetically constrained’. Here we use a modeling approach to evaluate the hypothesis that nectar sucrose proportion (NSP) is an adaptation to pollinators. We analyze ~2,100 species of asterids, spanning several plant families and pollinator groups (PGs), and show that the hypothesis of adaptation cannot be rejected: NSP evolves toward two optimal values, high NSP for...

Data from: Habitat filtering determines the functional niche occupancy of plant communities worldwide

Yuanzhi Li, Bill Shipley, Jodi N. Price, Vinícius De L. Dantas, Riin Tamme, Mark Westoby, Andrew Siefert, Brandon S. Schamp, Marko J. Spasojevic, Vincent Jung, Daniel C. Laughlin, Sarah J. Richardson, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Christian Schöb, Antonio Gazol, Honor C. Prentice, Nicolas Gross, Jacob Overton, Marcus V. Cianciaruso, Frédérique Louault, Chiho Kamiyama, Tohru Nakashizuka, Kouki Hikosaka, Takehiro Sasaki, Masatoshi Katabuchi … & Marco A. Batalha
How the patterns of niche occupancy vary from species-poor to species-rich communities is a fundamental question in ecology that has a central bearing on the processes that drive patterns of biodiversity. As species richness increases, habitat filtering should constrain the expansion of total niche volume, while limiting similarity should restrict the degree of niche overlap between species. Here, by explicitly incorporating intraspecific trait variability, we investigate the relationship between functional niche occupancy and species richness...

Data from: Inferring bounded evolution in phenotypic characters from phylogenetic comparative data

Florian C. Boucher & Vincent Démery
Our understanding of phenotypic evolution over macroevolutionary timescales largely relies on the use of stochastic models for the evolution of continuous traits over phylogenies. The two most widely used models, Brownian motion and the Ornstein–Uhlenbeck (OU) process, differ in that the latter includes constraints on the variance that a trait can attain in a clade. The OU model explicitly models adaptive evolution toward a trait optimum and has thus been widely used to demonstrate the...

Data from: Why do floral perfumes become different? Region-specific selection on floral scent in a terrestrial orchid

Karin Gross, Mimi Sun & Florian P. Schiestl
Geographically structured phenotypic selection can lead to adaptive divergence. However, in flowering plants, such divergent selection has rarely been shown, and selection on floral signals is generally little understood. In this study, we measured phenotypic selection on display size, floral color, and floral scent in four lowland and four mountain populations of the nectar-rewarding terrestrial orchid Gymnadenia odoratissima in two years. We also quantified population differences in these traits and pollinator community composition. Our results...

Data from: UV bullseye contrast of Hemerocallis flowers attracts hawkmoths but not swallowtail butterflies

Shun K. Hirota, Nozomu Miki, Akiko A. Yasumoto & Tetsukazu Yahara
The colour and patterns of animal-pollinated flowers are known to have effects on pollinator attraction. In this study, the relative importance of flower colour and colour contrast patterns on pollinator attraction was examined in two pollinator groups, swallowtail butterflies and hawkmoths using two Hemerocallis species; butterfly-pollinated H. fulva and hawkmoth-pollinated H. citrina, having reddish and yellowish flowers in human vision, respectively. Flowers of both species have UV bullseye patterns, composed of UV-absorbing centres and UV-reflecting...

Data from: Evolutionary radiations of Proteaceae are triggered by the interaction between traits and climates in open habitats

Renske E. Onstein, Gregory J. Jordan, Hervé Sauquet, Peter H. Weston, Yanis Bouchenak-Khelladi, Ian J. Wright, Raymond J. Carpenter & H. Peter Linder
Aim: Ecologically driven diversification can create spectacular diversity in both species numbers and form. However, the prediction that the match between intrinsic (e.g. functional trait) and extrinsic (e.g. climatic niche) variables may lead to evolutionary radiation has not been critically tested. Here, we test this hypothesis in the Southern Hemisphere plant family Proteaceae, which shows a spectacular diversity in open mediterranean shrublands in the Southwest Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR) and the Cape Floristic Region (CFR)....

Data from: Persistence of distinctive morphotypes in the native range of the CITES-listed Aldabra giant tortoise

Lindsay A. Turnbull, Arpat Ozgul, Wilna Accouche, Richard Baxter, Lindsay ChongSeng, Jock C. Currie, Naomi Doak, Dennis Hansen, Pierre M. Pistorius, Heather Richards, Janske Van De Crommenacker, Rainer Von Brandis, Frauke Fleischer-Dogley, Nancy Bunbury, Rich Baxter & Dennis M. Hansen
Understanding the extent of morphological variation in the wild population of Aldabra giant tortoises is important for conservation, as morphological variation in captive populations has been interpreted as evidence for lingering genes from extinct tortoise lineages. If true, this could impact reintroduction programmes in the region. The population of giant tortoises on Aldabra Atoll is subdivided and distributed around several islands. Although pronounced morphological variation was recorded in the late 1960s, it was thought to...

Evolution under pH stress and high population densities leads to increased density-dependent fitness in the protist Tetrahymena thermophila

Felix Moerman, Angelina Arquint, Stefanie Merkli, Andreas Wagner, Florian Altermatt & Emanuel Fronhofer
Abiotic stress is a major force of selection that organisms are constantly facing. While the evolutionary effects of various stressors have been broadly studied, it is only more recently that the relevance of interactions between evolution and underlying ecological conditions, that is, eco-evolutionary feedbacks, have been highlighted. Here, we experimentally investigated how populations adapt to pH-stress under high population densities. Using the protist species Tetrahymena thermophila, we studied how four different genotypes evolved in response...

Data from: Implementation of new standard operating procedures for geriatric trauma patients with multiple injuries: a single level I trauma centre study

Lorenz Peterer, Christian Ossendorf, Kai Oliver Jensen, Georg Osterhoff, Ladislav Mica, Burkhardt Seifert, Clément ML Werner, Hans-Peter Simmen, Hans-Christoph Pape & Kai Sprengel
Background The demographic changes towards ageing of the populations in developed countries impose a challenge to trauma centres, as geriatric trauma patients require specific diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. This study investigated whether the integration of new standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the resuscitation room (ER) has an impact on the clinical course in geriatric patients. The new SOPs were designed for severely injured adult trauma patients, based on the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) and...

Assessing seasonal demographic covariation to understand environmental-change impacts on a hibernating mammal

Maria Paniw, Dylan Childs, Kenneth Armitage, Daniel Blumstein, Julien Martin, Madan Oli & Arpat Ozgul
Natural populations are exposed to seasonal variation in environmental factors that simultaneously affect several demographic rates (survival, development, reproduction). The resulting covariation in these rates determines population dynamics, but accounting for its numerous biotic and abiotic drivers is a significant challenge. Here, we use a factor-analytic approach to capture partially unobserved drivers of seasonal population dynamics. We use 40 years of individual-based demography from yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventer) to fit and project population models that...

Leaf size of woody dicots predicts ecosystem primary productivity

Yaoqi Li, Peter Reich, Bernhard Schmid, Nawal Shrestha, Xiao Feng, Tong Lyv, Brian Maitner, Xiaoting Xu, Yichao Li, Dongting Zou, Zheng-Hong Tan, Xiangyan Su, Zhiyao Tang, Qinghua Guo, Xiaojuan Feng, Brian Enquist & Zhiheng Wang
A key challenge in ecology is to understand the relationships between organismal traits and ecosystem processes. Here, with a novel dataset of leaf length and width for 10,480 woody dicots in China and 2,374 in North America, we show that the variation in community mean leaf size is highly correlated with the variation in climate and ecosystem primary productivity, independent of plant life form. These relationships likely reflect how natural selection modifies leaf size across...

Data from: Cre-mediated, loxP independent sequential recombination of a tripartite transcriptional stop cassette allows for partial read-through transcription

Roland Wenger, Andreas M. Bapst, Sophie L. Dahl & Thomas Knöpfel
One of the widely used applications of the popular Cre-loxP method for targeted recombination is the permanent activation of marker genes, such as reporter genes or antibiotic resistance genes, by excision of a preceding transcriptional stop signal. The STOP cassette consists of three identical SV40-derived poly(A) signal repeats and is flanked by two loxP sites. We found that in addition to complete loxP-mediated recombination, limiting levels of the Cre recombinase also cause incomplete recombination of...

Data from: Phenotypic responses to temperature in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila

Vanessa Weber De Melo, Robert Lowe, Paul J. Hurd & Owen L. Petchey
Understanding the effects of temperature on ecological and evolutionary processes is crucial for generating future climate adaptation scenarios. Using experimental evolution, we evolved the model ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila in an initially novel high temperature environment for more than 35 generations, closely monitoring population dynamics and morphological changes. We observed initially long lag phases in the high temperature environment that over about 26 generations reduced to no lag phase, a strong reduction in cell size and...

Data from: The ghost of disturbance past: long-term effects of pulse disturbances on community biomass and composition

Claire Jacquet
Current global change is associated with an increase in disturbance frequency and intensity, with the potential to trigger population collapses and to cause permanent transitions to new ecosystem states. However, our understanding of ecosystem responses to disturbances is still incomplete. Specifically, there is a mismatch between the diversity of disturbance regimes experienced by ecosystems and the one-dimensional description of disturbances used in most studies on ecological stability. To fill this gap, we conducted a full...

Dataset marmoset Snowdrift

Alejandro Sanchez Amaro, Judith Burkart & Federico Rossano
Social primates constantly face situations in which their preferences collide and they need to engineer strategies to overcome conflicts of interest. Studies with chimpanzees have found that they use competitive strategies to overcome social dilemmas, maximizing their own benefits while minimizing the loss of rewards. However, little is known about how other primates that rely more on cooperation would overcome similar dilemmas. We therefore presented male-female pairs of common marmosets (cooperative breeders) with two experiments...

R script: Species coexist more easily if reinforcement is based on habitat preferences than on species recognition

Daisuke Kyogoku & Hanna Kokko
1. Maladaptive hybridization selects for prezygotic isolation, a process known as reinforcement. Reinforcement reduces gene flow and contributes to the final stage of speciation. Ecologically, however, coexistence of the incipient species is difficult if they initially use identical resources. 2. Habitat segregation offers an alternative to species discrimination as a way to reduce gene flow: production of unfit hybrids is reduced if mate encounters become rare due to differing habitat choice. Using a modelling approach,...

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