64 Works

Data from: Internal acoustic structuring in pied babbler recruitment cries specifies the form of recruitment

Sabrina Engesser, Amanda R Ridley, Marta B Manser, Andri Manser & Simon W Townsend
Language is inherently combinatorial, and parallels of this combinatorial capacity are found in nonhuman systems, with animals combining sounds and calls into larger meaningful structures. However, further analogue examples are central in unveiling the diversity, distribution, and evolutionary drivers of combinatoriality. Here, we provide evidence for internal “meaning-refining” acoustic variation within a larger stereotyped signal in pied babblers (Turdoides bicolor). Using acoustic analyses, we demonstrate that males produce 2 long, raucous, “cry-like” structures, both starting...

Data from: Positive effects of liana cutting on seedlings are reduced during El Niño-induced drought

Michael J. O'Brien, Christopher D. Philipson, Glen Reynolds, Dzaeman Dzulkifli, Jake L. Snaddon, Robert Ong & Andy Hector
1. Liana cutting is a management practice currently applied to encourage seedling regeneration and tree growth in some logged tropical forests. However, there is limited empirical evidence of its effects on forest demographic rates in Southeast Asia. 2. We used 22 four-hectare plots in the Sabah Biodiversity Experiment (a reduced impact logging site) enrichment line planted with 16 dipterocarp species to assess the effects of complete liana cutting on tree growth and survival. We compared...

Data from: Disturbance reverses classic biodiversity predictions in river-like landscapes

Eric Harvey, Isabelle Gounand, Emanuel A. Fronhofer & Florian Altermatt
Global analyses of biodiversity consistently reveal recurrent patterns of species distributions worldwide. However, unveiling the specific mechanisms behind those patterns remains logistically challenging, yet necessary for reliable biodiversity forecasts. Here, we combine theory and experiments to investigate the processes underlying spatial biodiversity patterns in dendritic, river-like landscapes, iconic examples of highly threatened ecosystems. We used geometric scaling properties, common to all rivers, to show that the distribution of biodiversity in these landscapes fundamentally depends on...

Data from: Bayesian divergence-time estimation with genome-wide SNP data of sea catfishes (Ariidae) supports Miocene closure of the Panamanian isthmus

Madlen Stange, Marcelo R. Sánchez-Villagra, Walter Salzburger & Michael Matschiner
The closure of the Isthmus of Panama has long been considered to be one of the best defined biogeographic calibration points for molecular divergence-time estimation. However, geological and biological evidence has recently cast doubt on the presumed timing of the initial isthmus closure around 3 Ma but has instead suggested the existence of temporary land bridges as early as the Middle or Late Miocene. The biological evidence supporting these earlier land bridges was based either...

Data from: Impacts of species richness on productivity in a large-scale subtropical forest experiment

Yuanyuan Huang, Yuxin Chen, Nadia Castro-Izaguirre, Martin Baruffol, Matteo Brezzi, Anne Lang, Ying Li, Werner Härdtle, Werner Von Oheimb, Xuefeu Yang, Xiaojuan Liu, Kequan Pei, Sabine Both, Bo Yang, David Eichenberg, Thorsten Assmann, Jürgen Bauhus, Thorsten Behrens, François Buscot, Xiao-Yong Chen, Douglas Chester, Bing-Yang Ding, Walter Durka, Alexandra Erfmeier, Jingyun Fang … & Bernhard Schmid
Biodiversity experiments have shown that species loss reduces ecosystem functioning in grassland. To test whether this result can be extrapolated to forests, the main contributors to terrestrial primary productivity, requires large-scale experiments. We manipulated tree species richness by planting more than 150,000 trees in plots with 1 to 16 species. Simulating multiple extinction scenarios, we found that richness strongly increased stand-level productivity. After 8 years, 16-species mixtures had accumulated over twice the amount of carbon...

Data from: Controlled feeding experiments with diets of different abrasiveness reveal slow development of mesowear signal in goats (Capra aegagrus hircus)

Nicole L. Ackermans, Daniela E. Winkler, Ellen Schulz-Kornas, Thomas M. Kaiser, Dennis W.H. Mueller, Patrick R. Kircher, Jurgen Hummel, Marcus Clauss & Jean-Michel Hatt
Dental mesowear is applied as a proxy to determine the general diet of mammalian herbivores based on tooth-cusp shape and occlusal relief. Low, blunt cusps are considered typical for grazers and high, sharp cusps typical for browsers. However, how internal or external abrasives impact mesowear, and the time frame the wear signature takes to develop, still need to be explored. Four different pelleted diets of increasing abrasiveness (lucerne, grass, grass and rice husks, grass, rice...

Data from: Within-species tradeoffs in plant-stimulated soil enzyme activity and growth, flowering and seed size

Courtney E. Gomola, John K. McKay, Matthew D. Wallenstein, Cameron Wagg & Michael J. O'Brien
1. Soil microbial communities affect species demographic rates of plants. In turn, plants influence the composition and function of the soil microbiome, potentially resulting in beneficial feedbacks that alter their fitness and establishment. For example, differences in the ability to stimulate soil enzyme activity among plant lineages may affect plant growth and reproduction. 2. We used a common garden study to test differences in plant-stimulated soil enzyme activity between lineages of the same species across...

Data from: Disruptive sexual selection on body size in the polyphenic black scavenger fly Sepsis thoracica

Juan Pablo Busso & Wolf U. Blanckenhorn
Sexual selection has two main components, female preference and male-male competition, which can lead males to adopt alternative reproductive tactics to optimize their reproductive success. Two traits that significantly influence reproductive success are body size and coloration, as they can facilitate access to females through male contests or as female attractors. We investigated whether, and if so which mechanism of sexual selection contributes to the maintenance, and possibly even the establishment, of two almost discrete...

Data from: Lion population dynamics: do nomadic males matter?

Natalia Borrego, Arpat Ozgul, Rob Slotow & Craig Packer
Key population processes are sometimes driven by male dynamics, but these drivers are often overlooked because of the scale over which they operate. Lions (Panthera leo) provide an ideal case study for investigating factors governing male dynamics and their influence on population sustainability. Lions display sexually selected infanticide, and resident males must defend their offspring from nomads that may have dispersed over long distances; factors affecting male-male competition over large spatial scales can have population...

Data from: Daphnia females adjust sex allocation in response to current sex ratio and density

Isobel Booksmythe, Nina Gerber, Dieter Ebert & Hanna Kokko
Cyclical parthenogenesis presents an interesting challenge for the study of sex allocation, as individuals’ allocation decisions involve both the choice between sexual and asexual reproduction, and the choice between sons and daughters. Male production is therefore expected to depend on ecological and evolutionary drivers of overall investment in sex, and those influencing male reproductive value during sexual periods. We manipulated experimental populations, and made repeated observations of natural populations over their growing season, to disentangle...

Data from: Trait means, trait plasticity and trait differences to other species jointly explain species performances in grasslands of varying diversity

Christiane Roscher, Marlén Gubsch, Annett Lipowsky, Jens Schumacher, Alexandra Weigelt, Nina Buchmann, Ernst-Detlef Schulze & Bernhard Schmid
Functional traits may help to explain the great variety of species performances in plant communities, but it is not clear whether the magnitude of trait values of a focal species or trait differences to co-occurring species are key for trait-based predictions. In addition, trait expression within species is often plastic, but this variation has been widely neglected in trait-based analyses. We studied functional traits and plant biomass of 59 species in 66 experimental grassland mixtures...

Data from: Heritable spouse effects increase evolutionary potential of human reproductive timing

Simon R. Evans, Dominique Waldvogel, Nina Vasiljevic & Erik Postma
Sexual reproduction is inherently interactive, especially in animal species such as humans that exhibit extended pair bonding. Yet we have little knowledge of the role of male characteristics and their evolutionary impact on reproductive behavioural phenotypes, to the extent that biologists typically consider component traits (e.g., reproductive timing) as female-specific. Based on extensive genealogical data detailing the life-histories of 6,435 human mothers born across four centuries of modern history, we use an animal modelling approach...

Data from: The architecture of an empirical genotype-phenotype map

Jose Aguilar-Rodriguez, Leto Peel, Massimo Stella, Andreas Wagner & Joshua L. Payne
Recent advances in high-throughput technologies are bringing the study of empirical genotype-phenotype (GP) maps to the fore. Here, we use data from protein binding microarrays to study an empirical GP map of transcription factor (TF) binding preferences. In this map, each genotype is a DNA sequence. The phenotype of this DNA sequence is its ability to bind one or more TFs. We study this GP map using genotype networks, in which nodes represent genotypes with...

Data from: An expanded molecular phylogeny of Plumbaginaceae, with emphasis on Limonium (sea lavenders): taxonomic implications and biogeographic considerations

Konstantina Koutroumpa, Spyros Theodoridis, Ben H. Warren, Ares Jiménez, Ferhat Celep, Musa Doğan, Maria M. Romeiras, Arnoldo Santos-Guerra, José María Fernández-Palacios, Juli Caujapé-Castells, Mónica Moura, Miguel M. Sequeira, Elena Conti & Miguel Menezes De Sequeira
Plumbaginaceae is characterized by a history of multiple taxonomic rearrangements and lacks a broad molecular phylogenetic framework. Limonium is the most species‐rich genus of the family with ca. 600 species and cosmopolitan distribution. Its center of diversity is the Mediterranean region, where ca. 70% of all Limonium species are endemic. In this study, we sample 201 Limonium species covering all described infrageneric entities and spanning its wide geographic range, along with 64 species of other...

Data from: Re-evaluation of the ontogeny and reproductive biology of the Triassic fish Saurichthys (Actinopterygii, Saurichthyidae)

Erin E. Maxwell, Thodoris Argyriou, Rudolf Stockar & Heinz Furrer
Viviparity has evolved independently at least 12 times in ray-finned fishes. However, the fossil record of actinopterygian viviparity is poor, with only two documented occurrences. Both of these are from the non-teleost actinopterygian Saurichthys, and include S. curionii and S. macrocephalus from the Middle Triassic Meride Limestone (Monte San Giorgio, Switzerland). Here, we present new data on the reproductive biology of these species, giving unprecedented insights into their life-history. Based on positional and preservational criteria,...

Data from: Mimicking a rainfall gradient to test the role of soil microbiota for mediating plant species responses to drier conditions

Michael J. O'Brien, Francisco I. Pugnaire, Susana Rodríguez-Echeverría, Jose A. Morillo, Francisco Martín-Usero, Almudena López-Escoriza, Diego J. Aránega & Cristina Armas Kulik
Plant interactions with soil microbiota are important drivers of biodiversity and ecosystem function, but climate change can modify these interactions by directly altering the soil community, which can affect the direction and magnitude of such interactions. We manipulated water quantity and soil microbiota of two populations of three plant species that differ in their interactions with soil microbiota and assessed germination and biomass production under conditions that mimicked a rainfall gradient in SE Spain. We...

Data from: Interrelations of global macroecological patterns in wing and thorax size, sexual size dimorphism, and range size of the Drosophilidae

Patrick T. Rohner, Scott Pitnick, Wolf U. Blanckenhorn, Rhonda R. Snook, Gerhard Bächli & Stefan Lüpold
Support for macroecological rules in insects is mixed, with potential confounding interrelations between patterns rarely studied. We here investigate global patterns in body and wing size, sexual size dimorphism and range size in common fruit flies (Diptera: Drosophilidae) and explore potential interrelations and the predictive power of Allen's, Bergmann’s, Rensch’s and Rapoport’s rules. We found that thorax length (r2 = 0.05) and wing size (r2 = 0.09) increased with latitude, supporting Bergmann’s rule. Contrary to...

Data from: Palaeobiogeographical structuration of Smithian (Early Triassic) ammonoid faunas within the western USA basin and its controlling parameters

Romain Jattiot, Arnaud Brayard, Hugo Bucher, Emmanuelle Vennin, Gwénaël Caravaca, James F. Jenks, Kevin G. Bylund & Gilles Escarguel
We present the first quantitative palaeobiogeographical analysis in terms of distribution and abundance of Early Triassic ammonoids from the western USA basin during the Smithian, c. 1 myr after the Permian–Triassic boundary mass extinction. The faunal dataset consists of a taxonomically homogenized compilation of spatial and temporal occurrences and abundances from 27 sections distributed within the western USA basin. Two complementary multivariate techniques were applied to identify the main biogeographical structuring recorded in the analysed...

Data from: Study of morphological variation of northern Neotropical Ariidae reveals conservatism despite macrohabitat transitions

Madlen Stange, Gabriel Aguirre-Fernández, Walter Salzburger & Marcelo R. Sánchez-Villagra
Background: Morphological convergence triggered by trophic adaptations is a common pattern in adaptive radiations. The study of shape variation in an evolutionary context is usually restricted to well-studied fish models. We take advantage of the recently revised systematics of New World Ariidae and investigate skull shape evolution in six genera of northern Neotropical Ariidae. They constitute a lineage that diversified in the marine habitat but repeatedly adapted to freshwater habitats. 3D geometric morphometrics was applied...

Data from: Replicated latitudinal clines in reproductive traits of European and North American yellow dung flies

Stephanie S. Bauerfeind, Martin A. Schäfer, David Berger, Wolf U. Blanckenhorn & Charles W. Fox
Geographic variation in phenotypic traits is commonly correlated with spatial variation in the environment, e.g., seasonality and mean temperature, providing evidence that natural selection generates such patterns. In particular, both body size and egg size of ectothermic animals are commonly larger in northern climates, and temperature induces plastic responses in both traits. Size-independent egg quality can also vary with latitude, though this is rarely investigated. For the widespread yellow dung fly (Scathophaga stercoraria; Diptera: Scathophagidae),...

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Numerical response of mammalian carnivores to rodents affects bird reproduction in temperate forests: a case of apparent competition?

Alexander Grendelmeier, Raphaël Arlettaz, Gilberto Pasinelli & Alex Grendelmeier
Resource pulses such as mast seeding in temperate forests may affect interspecific interactions over multiple trophic levels and link different seed and non-seed consumers directly via predation or indirectly via shared predators. However, the nature and strength of interactions among species remain unknown for most resource pulse driven ecosystems. We considered five hypotheses concerning the influence of resource pulses on the interactions between rodents, predators and bird reproduction with data from northern Switzerland collected between...

Data from: Anisian (Middle Triassic) ammonoids from British Columbia (Canada): biochronological and palaeobiogeographic implications

Cheng Ji & Hugo Bucher
New Anisian (Middle Triassic) ammonoids are reported from British Columbia (BC), Canada. Eight species are reported, including one new genus and two new species: Eufrechites roopnarini gen. et sp. nov. and Parafrechites cordeyi sp. nov. New ammonoid subzones are recognized, leading to improved correlation between BC and Nevada: the Hollandites minor Zone is correlated with the interval intercalated between the Unionvillites hadleyi Subzone and the Pseudodanubites nicholsi Subzone; an Eogymnotoceras thompsoni - Anagymnotoceras spivaki Zone...

Data from: Quantifying climate sensitivity and climate-driven change in North American amphibian communities

David A. W. Miller, Evan H. Campbell Grant, Erin Muths, Staci M. Amburgey, Michael J. Adams, Maxwell B. Joseph, J. Hardin Waddle, Pieter T. J. Johnson, Maureen E. Ryan, Benedikt R. Schmidt, Daniel L. Calhoun, Courtney L. Davis, Robert N. Fisher, David M. Green, Blake R. Hossack, Tracy A. G. Rittenhouse, Susan C. Walls, Larissa L. Bailey, Sam S. Cruickshank, Gary M. Fellers, Thomas A. Gorman, Carola A. Haas, Ward Hughson, David S. Pilliod, Steven J. Price … & Brent H. Sigafus
Changing climate will impact species’ ranges only when environmental variability directly impacts the demography of local populations. However, measurement of demographic responses to climate change has largely been limited to single species and locations. Here we show that amphibian communities are responsive to climatic variability, using >500,000 time-series observations for 81 species across 86 North American study areas. The effect of climate on local colonization and persistence probabilities varies among eco-regions and depends on local...

Data from: Predation risk shaped by habitat and landscape complexity in urban environments

David Frey, Kevin Vega, Florian Zellweger, Jaboury Ghazoul, Dennis Hansen & Marco Moretti
1. Habitat loss and modification are hallmarks of anthropogenic ecosystems, but the consequences for ecosystem functions and services often remain unclear. Understanding these links in cities is complicated by strong but fine-scale differences in habitat structure among green space patches, and a high variance in habitat amount across urban landscapes. 2. We used airborne laser scanning (ALS) data to disentangle the effects of 3D woody habitat heterogeneity of urban home gardens, and woody habitat amount...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    64

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    64

Affiliations

  • University of Zurich
    64
  • University of Basel
    6
  • University of Oxford
    6
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    4
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    3
  • University of Kentucky
    3
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    3
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
    3