69 Works

Intraspecific genetic variation and spectral data of a Fagus sylvatica population in a temperate forest

Ewa Agata Czyz
This dataset contain genetic variation and multi-annual conopy level spectral responses of 77 Fagus sylvatica individuals from Laegern temperate forest (47°28'N, 8°21'E) population.

Data from: The origin of the legumes is a complex paleopolyploid phylogenomic tangle closely associated with the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction event

Erik Koenen, Dario Ojeda, Freek Bakker, Jan Wieringa, Catherine Kidner, Olivier Hardy, Toby Pennington, Patrick Herendeen, Anne Bruneau & Colin Hughes
The consequences of the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary (KPB) mass extinction for the evolution of plant diversity remain poorly understood, even though evolutionary turnover of plant lineages at the KPB is central to understanding assembly of the Cenozoic biota. The apparent concentration of whole genome duplication (WGD) events around the KPB may have played a role in survival and subsequent diversification of plant lineages. To gain new insights into the origins of Cenozoic biodiversity, we examine...

Evolution in interacting species alters predator life history traits, behavior and morphology in experimental microbial communities

Johannes Cairns, Felix Moerman, Emanuel Fronhofer, Florian Altermatt & Teppo Hiltunen
Predator-prey interactions are key for the dynamics of many ecosystems. An increasing body of evidence suggests that rapid evolution and co-evolution can alter these interactions, with important ecological implications, by acting on traits determining fitness, including reproduction, anti-predatory defense and foraging efficiency. However, most studies to date have focused only on evolution in the prey species, and the predator traits in (co-)evolving systems remain poorly understood. Here we investigated changes in predator traits after ~600...

The performance of permutations and exponential random graph models when analysing animal networks (R code and data)

Matthew Silk, Julian Evans & David Fisher
Social network analysis is a suite of approaches for exploring relational data. Two approaches commonly used to analyse animal social network data are permutation-based tests of significance and exponential random graph models. However, the performance of these approaches when analysing different types of network data has not been simultaneously evaluated. Here we test both approaches to determine their performance when analysing a range of biologically realistic simulated animal social networks. We examined the false positive...

Image stack, PLY-files and a NEX-file accompanying: A new symmoriiform from the Late Devonian of Morocco: novel jaw function in ancient sharks

Linda Frey, Michael I. Coates, Kristen Tietjen, Martin Rücklin & Christian Klug
We describe the small chondrichthyan Ferromirum oukherbouchi n.gen. et sp. from the Famennian (Late Devonian) of the Maïder region in Morocco. This chondrichthyan is exceptionally well preserved and displays not only mineralized soft tissues but also undeformed cartilages of the head, gills, and shoulder girdle. A reconstruction of the head using 3D-prints revealed a previously unknown kind of jaw articulation. Here, we make the original cropped image stack and PLY-files of the single cartilaginous elements...

Data from: Plant trait response of tundra shrubs to permafrost and nutrient addition

Maitane Iturrate-Garcia & Gabriela Schaepman-Strub
Plants may alter their strategies, such as growth and resource acquisition, as a result of climate change, especially in areas like the Arctic. These changes might affect in turn ecosystem functions and vegetation-climate interactions. Plant traits reflect both strategies and plant trade-offs in response to environmental conditions. In combination with observational data, experiments mimicking future climate conditions and data involving multiple leaf and stem traits, can contribute to a better mechanistic understanding of feedbacks between...

Distal and proximal hypoxia response elements cooperate to regulate organ-specific erythropoietin gene expression

Roland Wenger, Ilaria M.C. Orlando, Véronique N. Lafleur, Federica Storti, Patrick Spielmann, Lisa Crowther, Sara Santambrogio, Johannes Schödel, David Hoogewijs & David R. Mole
While it is well-established that distal hypoxia response elements (HREs) regulate hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) target genes such as erythropoietin (Epo), an interplay between multiple distal and proximal (promoter) HREs has not been described so far. Hepatic Epo expression is regulated by a HRE located downstream of the EPO gene, but this 3' HRE is dispensable for renal EPO gene expression. We previously identified a 5' HRE and could show that both HREs direct exogenous reporter...

Natural history, phenotypic spectrum, and discriminative features of multisystemic RFC1-disease

Andreas Traschütz, Andrea Cortese, Selina Reich, Natalia Dominik, Jennifer Faber, Heike Jacobi, Annette Hartmann, Dan Rujescu, Solveig Montaut, Andoni Echaniz-Laguna, Sevda Erer, Valerie Cornelia Schütz, Alexander Tarnutzer, Marc Sturm, Tobias Haack, Nadège Vaucamps-Diedhiou, Helene Puccio, Ludger Schöls, Thomas Klockgether, Bart P. Van De Warrenburg, Martin Paucar, Dagmar Timmann, Ralf-Dieter Hilgers, Jose Gazulla, Michael Strupp … & Matthis Synofzik
Objective: To delineate the full phenotypic spectrum, discriminative features, piloting longitudinal progression data, and sample size calculations of RFC1-repeat expansions, recently identified as causing cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS). Methods: Multimodal RFC1 repeat screening (PCR, southern blot, whole-exome/genome (WES/WGS)-based approaches) combined with cross-sectional and longitudinal deep-phenotyping in (i) cross-European cohort A (70 families) with ≥2 features of CANVAS and/or ataxia-with-chronic-cough (ACC); and (ii) Turkish cohort B (105 families) with unselected late-onset ataxia. Results:...

The sodium/proton exchanger NHA2 regulates blood pressure through a WNK4-NCC dependent pathway in the kidney

Daniel Fuster, Manuel Anderegg, Giuseppe Albano, Daniela Hanke, Christine Deisl, Dominik E. Uehlinger, Simone Brandt, Rajesh Bhardwaj & Matthias A. Hediger
NHA2 is sodium/hydrogen exchanger that was associated with arterial hypertension in humans, but the role of NHA2 in kidney function and blood pressure homeostasis is currently unknown. Here we show that NHA2 localizes almost exclusively to distal convoluted tubules in the kidney. NHA2 knock-out mice displayed reduced blood pressure, normocalcemic hypocalciuria and an attenuated response to the thiazide diuretic hydrochlorothiazide. Phosphorylation of the thiazide-sensitive sodium/chloride cotransporter NCC and its upstream activating kinase Ste20/SPS1-related proline/alaninerich kinase...

Social learning by mate-choice copying increases dispersal and reduces local adaptation

Manuel Sapage, Susana A. M. Varela & Hanna Kokko
1. In heterogeneous environments, dispersal may be hampered not only by direct costs, but also because immigrants may be locally maladapted. While maladaptation affects both sexes, this cost may be modulated in females if they express mate preferences that are either adaptive or maladaptive in the new local population. 2. Dispersal costs under local adaptation may be mitigated if it is possible to switch to expressing traits of locally adapted residents. In a sexual selection...

Dust and grit matter: abrasives of different size lead to opposing dental microwear textures in experimentally fed sheep (Ovis aries)

Nicole Ackermans, Daniela E. Winkler, Thomas M. Kaiser, Marcus Clauss & Jean-Michel Hatt
External abrasives ingested along with the herbivore diet are considered main contributors to dental wear, though how different abrasive sizes and concentrations influence wear remains unclear. Dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA) is an established method for dietary reconstruction which describes a tooth’s surface topography on a micrometre scale. The method has yielded conflicting results as to the effect of external abrasives. In the present study, a feeding experiment was performed on sheep (Ovis aries), fed...

Diversification in evolutionary arenas – assessment and synthesis

Nicolai M. Nürk, H. Peter Linder, Renske E. Onstein, Matthew J. Larcombe, Colin E. Hughes, Laura Piñeiro Fernández, Philipp M. Schlüter, Luis Valente, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Vanessa Cutts, Michael J. Donoghue, Erika J. Edwards, Richard Field, Suzette G.A. Flantua, Steven I. Higgins, Anke Jentsch, Sigrid Liede-Schumann & Michael D. Pirie
Understanding how and why rates of evolutionary diversification vary is a central issue in evolutionary biology, ecology and biogeography. The concept of adaptive radiation has attracted much interest, but is metaphorical and verbal in nature, making it difficult to quantitatively compare different evolutionary lineages or geographic regions. In addition, the causes of evolutionary stasis are relatively neglected. Here we review the central concepts in the evolutionary diversification literature and bring these together by proposing a...

The geography of speciation in dasyurid marsupials

Vicente García-Navas
Aim: To determine the effects of competition and divergence time on morphological dissimilarity and geographical range overlap between dasyurid species at both regional and local scales. Our hypothesis is that speciation in this group has been largely allopatric at regional scale, but involved morphological divergence at local scale through sympatric character displacement. Location: Australia, New Guinea and surrounding islands. Taxon: Dasyurid (Dasyuridae) marsupials, 67 species. Methods: Geographical range overlap was quantified using polygons representing the...

Data for: Rise and fall of Pycnodontiformes: Diversity, competition and extinction of a successful fish clade

John Joseph Cawley, Giuseppe Marramà, Giorgio Carnevale, Jaime Villifaña, Faviel López-Romero & Jürgen Kriwet
Pycnodontiformes was a successful lineage of primarily marine fishes that broadly diversified during the Mesozoic. They possessed a wide variety of body shapes and were adapted to a broad range of food sources. Two other neopterygian clades possessing similar ecological adaptations in both body morphology (Dapediiformes) and dentition (Ginglymodi) also occurred in Mesozoic seas. Although these groups occupied the same marine ecosystems, the role that competitive exclusion and niche partitioning played in their ability to...

Biomes as evolutionary arenas: convergence and conservatism in the trans-continental Succulent Biome

Jens Ringelberg, Niklaus Zimmermann, Andrea Weeks, Matt Lavin & Colin Hughes
Aim: Biomes are globally-distributed, structurally and functionally similar vegetation units, but there is debate about whether these similarities are superficial, and about how biomes are defined and mapped. We propose that combined assessment of evolutionary convergence of plant functional traits and phylogenetic biome conservatism provides a useful approach for characterising biomes. We focus on the little-known succulent biome, a trans-continentally distributed assemblage of succulent-rich, drought-deciduous, fire-free forest, thicket and scrub vegetation as a useful exemplar...

Adaptation to elevation but limited local adaptation in an amphibian

Judith C. Bachmann & Josh Van Buskirk
We performed a reciprocal transplant experiment to estimate “parallel” adaptation to elevation and “unique” adaptation to local sites at the same elevation, using the frog Rana temporaria in the Swiss Alps. It is important to distinguish these two processes because they have different implications for population structure and ecological specialization. Larvae were reared from hatching to metamorphosis within enclosures installed in their pond of origin, in three foreign ponds at the same elevation, and in...

Wildflower strips enhance wild bee reproductive success

Dominik Ganser, Matthias Albrecht & Eva Knop
1. Intensification of agriculture has resulted in a simplification and fragmentation of agroecosystems. Yet, its impact on the reproductive success and population dynamics of wild bees, and how adverse effects can be mitigated, remains poorly understood. 2. We established populations of seven solitary bee species varying in body size in experimentally sown wild flower strips (WFS), existing semi-natural habitats (SNH; forest edges) and isolated sites lacking WFS and SNH in the local surrounding (350 m...

Data for: Immigration counter-acts local micro-evolution of a major fitness component: migration-selection balance in free-living song sparrows

Jane Reid, Peter Arcese, Pirmin Nietlisbach, Matthew Wolak, Stefanie Muff, Lisa Dickel & Lukas Keller
Ongoing adaptive evolution, and resulting ‘evolutionary rescue’ of declining populations, requires additive genetic variation in fitness. Such variation can be increased by gene flow resulting from immigration, potentially facilitating evolution. But, gene flow could in fact constrain rather than facilitate local adaptive evolution if immigrants have low additive genetic values for local fitness. Local migration-selection balance and micro-evolutionary stasis could then result. However, key quantitative genetic effects of natural immigration, comprising the degrees to which...

Data from: Life-history dimensions indicate non-random assembly processes in tropical island tree communities

Julian Schrader, Dylan Craven, Cornelia Sattler, Rodrigo Cámara-Leret, Soetjipto Moeljono & Holger Kreft
Community assembly processes on islands are often non-random. The mechanisms behind non-random assembly, however, are generally difficult to disentangle. Functional diversity in combination with a null model approach that accounts for differences in species richness among islands can be used to test for non-random assembly processes, but has been applied rarely to island communities. By linking functional diversity of trees on islands with a null model approach, we bridge this gap and test for the...

Genomics of population differentiation in humpback dolphins, Sousa spp. in the Indo-Pacific Ocean

Ana Rita Amaral, Cátia Chanfana, Brian Smith, Rubaiyat Mansur, Tim Collins, Robert Baldwin, Gianna Minton, Guido Parra, Michael Krutzen, Thomas Jefferson, Leszek Karczmarski, Almeida Guissamulo, & Howard Rosenbaum
Speciation is a fundamental process in evolution and crucial to the formation of biodiversity. It is a continuous and complex process, which can involve multiple interacting barriers leading to heterogeneous genomic landscapes with various peaks of divergence among populations. In this study, we used a population genomics approach to gain insights on the speciation process and to understand the population structure within the genus Sousa across its distribution in the Indo-Pacifc region. We found 5...

Bird communities in the Swiss Alps, 1999-2018, abundance data

Vicente García-Navas, Thomas Sattler, Hans Schmid & Arpat Ozgul
Aim: Mountains are biodiversity hotspots and are among the most sensitive eco- systems to ongoing global change being thus of conservation concern. Under this scenario, assessing how biological communities vary over time along elevational gra- dients and the relative effects of niche-based deterministic processes and stochastic events in structuring assemblages is essential. Here, we examined how the temporal trends of bird communities vary with elevation over a 20 year-period (1999–2018). We also tested for differences...

Data from: Gene swamping alters evolution during range expansions in the protist Tetrahymena thermophila

Felix Moerman, Emanuel Fronhofer, Andreas Wagner & Florian Altermatt
At species’ range edges, individuals often face novel environmental conditions that may limit range expansion until populations adapt. The potential to adapt depends on genetic variation upon which selection can act. However, populations at species’ range edges are often genetically depauperated. One mechanism to increase genetic variation is to reshuffle existing variation through sex. During range expansions, sex can, however, act as a double-edged sword. The gene swamping hypothesis predicts that for populations expanding along...

Data from: Increasing dependence of lowland populations on mountain water resources

Daniel Viviroli, Matti Kummu, Michel Meybeck, Marko Kallio & Yoshihide Wada
Mountain areas provide disproportionally high runoff in many parts of the world, and here we quantify for the first time their importance for water resources and food production from the viewpoint of the lowland areas downstream. The dataset maps the degree to which lowland areas potentially depend on runoff contributions from mountain areas (39% of land mass) between the 1960s and the 2040s.

How female × male and male × male interactions influence competitive fertilization in Drosophila melanogaster

Stefan Lüpold, Jonathan Reil, Mollie Manier, Valérian Zeender, John Belote & Scott Pitnick
How males and females contribute to joint reproductive success has been a long-standing question in sexual selection. Under postcopulatory sexual selection (PSS), paternity success is predicted to derive from complex interactions among females engaging in cryptic female choice and males engaging in sperm competition. Such interactions have been identified as potential sources of genetic variation in sexually selected traits but are also expected to inhibit trait diversification. To date, studies of interactions between females and...

Data from: Testing multiple drivers of the temperature-size rule with nonlinear temperature increase

Andrea Tabi, Aurélie Garnier & Frank Pennekamp
The temperature-size rule (TSR) describes the inverse relationship between organism size and environmental temperature in uni- and multicellular species. Despite the TSR being widespread, the mechanisms for shrinking body size with warming remain elusive. Here, we experimentally test three hypotheses (differential development and growth [DDG], maintain aerobic scope and regulate oxygen supply [MASROS] and the supply-demand hypothesis [SD]) potentially explaining the TSR using the aquatic protist Colpidium striatum in three gradually changing and one constant...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    69

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    69

Affiliations

  • University of Zurich
    69
  • Naturalis Biodiversity Center
    4
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
    4
  • University of Lisbon
    3
  • Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution de Montpellier
    2
  • University of Basel
    2
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    2
  • University of Camerino
    1
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • Institute of Genetics and Molecular and Cellular Biology
    1