59 Works

Arabidopsis ovule primordium stages 0-I to 2-II, wild-type Col_0, Ws-4 and botero (bot1-7) mutant

Célia Baroux, Ethel Mendocilla-Sato & Daphné Autran
This image resource describes the development of ovule primordia from stages 0-I to 2-I in 3D and at cellular resolution. The images were segmented using ImarisCell (BitplaneAG) and annotated as described in the associated manuscript Hernandez-Lagana et al. https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.07.30.226670v3

Data from: Facilitation and biodiversity jointly drive mutualistic networks

Gianalberto Losapio, Elizabeth Norton Hasday, Xavier Espadaler, Christoph Germann, Francisco Javier Ortiz-Sánchez, Adrian Pont, Daniele Sommaggio & Christian Schöb
1. Facilitation by nurse plants increases understorey diversity and supports ecological communities. In turn, biodiversity shapes ecological networks and enhances ecosystem functioning. However, whether and how facilitation and increased biodiversity jointly influence community structure and ecosystem functioning remains unclear. 2. We performed a field experiment disentangling the relative contribution of nurse plants and increasing understorey plant diversity in driving pollination interactions. Both the presence of nurse shrubs as well as increased understorey plant diversity increased...

Functional constraints during development limit jaw shape evolution in marsupials

Anne-Claire Fabre, Carys Dawling, Roberto Portela Miguez, Vincent Fernandez, Eve Noirault & Anjali Goswami
Differences in jaw function experienced through ontogeny can have striking consequences for evolutionary outcomes, as has been suggested for the major clades of mammals. In contrast to placentals, marsupial newborns have an accelerated development of the head and forelimbs, allowing them to crawl to the mother’s teats to suckle within just a few weeks of conception. The different functional requirements that marsupial newborns experience in early postnatal development have been hypothesized to have constrained their...

Bird species co-occurrence patterns in an Alpine environment supports the stress gradient hypothesis

Vicente García-Navas, Thomas Sattler, Hans Schmid & Arpat Ozgul
Understanding the relative contribution of different biotic interactions in shaping species assemblages constitutes a major goal in community ecology and consequently, multiple methods aimed at inferring the nature of these associations have emerged during the last decade. In this framework, the stress-gradient hypothesis (SGH) predicts that prevalent biotic interactions shift from competition to facilitation as abiotic stress increases (and productivity decreases). This hypothesis originally raised by plant ecologists has been barely applied to faunal communities....

Behavioural change during dispersal and its relationship to survival and reproduction in a cooperative breeder

Natasha Harrison, Nino Maag, Paul Haverkamp, André Ganswindt, Marta Manser, Tim Clutton-Brock, Arpat Ozgul & Gabriele Cozzi
(1) The ability of dispersing individuals to adjust their behaviour to changing conditions is instrumental in overcoming challenges and reducing dispersal costs, consequently increasing overall dispersal success. Understanding how dispersers’ behaviour and physiology change during the dispersal process, and how they differ from resident individuals, can shed light on the mechanisms by which dispersers increase survival and maximise reproduction. (2) By analysing individual behaviour and concentrations of faecal glucocorticoid metabolites (fGCM), a stress-associated biomarker, we...

Context-dependent dispersal determines relatedness and genetic structure in a patchy amphibian population

Bianca Unglaub, Hugo Cayuela, Benedikt R. Schmidt, Kathleen Preißler, Julian Glos & Sebastian Steinfartz
Dispersal is a central process in ecology and evolution with far reaching consequences for the dynamics and genetics of spatially structured populations (SSPs). Individuals can adjust their decisions to disperse according to local fitness prospects, resulting in context-dependent dispersal. By determining dispersal rate, distance, and direction, these individual-level decisions further modulate the demography, relatedness, and genetic structure of SSPs. Here, we examined how context-dependent dispersal influences the dynamics and genetics of a Great Crested Newt...

Data from: Local adaptation, geographical distance and phylogenetic relatedness: assessing the drivers of siderophore-mediated social interactions in natural bacterial communities

Rolf Kümmerli, Elena Butaite & Jos Kramer
In heterogenous, spatially structured habitats, individuals within populations can become adapted to the prevailing conditions in their local environment. Such local adaptation has been reported for animals and plants, and for pathogens adapting to hosts. There is increasing interest in applying the concept of local adaptation to microbial populations, especially in the context of microbe-microbe interactions. Here, we tested whether cooperation and cheating on cooperation can spur patterns of local adaptation in soil and pond...

Migration without interbreeding: Evolutionary history of a highly selfing Mediterranean grass inferred from whole genomes

Christoph Stritt
Wild plant populations show extensive genetic subdivision and are far from the ideal of panmixia which permeates population genetic theory. Understanding the spatial and temporal scale of population structure is therefore fundamental for empirical population genetics – and of interest in itself, as it yields insights into the history and biology of a species. In this study we extend the genomic resources for the wild Mediterranean grass Brachypodium distachyon to investigate the scale of population...

Mammalian intestinal allometry, phylogeny, trophic level and climate

María Duque-Correa, Daryl Codron, Carlo Meloro, Amanda McGrosky, Christiann Schiffmann, Mark Edwards & Marcus Clauss
An often-stated ecomorphological assumption that has the status of ‘textbook knowledge’ is that the dimensions of the digestive tract correlate with diet, where herbivores – consuming diets of lower digestibility – have longer intestinal tracts than faunivores – consuming diets of higher digestibility. However, statistical approaches have so far failed to demonstrate this link. Here, we collated data on the length of intestinal sections and body mass of 519 mammal species, and test for various...

Bound within boundaries: How well do protected areas match movement corridors of their most mobile protected species?

David D. Hofmann, Dominik M. Behr, John W. McNutt, Arpat Ozgul & Gabriele Cozzi
Conserving and managing large portions of land to connect wildlife reserves is an increasingly used strategy to maintain and restore connectivity among wildlife populations. Boundaries of such conservation areas are often determined based on expert opinion and socio-political constraints, yet the extent to which they match species’ movement corridors is rarely examined. This is mainly due to a lack of data, particularly on wide-ranging movement behavior such as dispersal. Nevertheless, empirically assessing the adequacy of...

Cooperation-based concept formation in male bottlenose dolphins

Stephanie King, Richard Connor, Michael Krützen & Simon Allen
In Shark Bay, Western Australia, male bottlenose dolphins form a complex nested alliance hierarchy. At the first level, pairs or trios of unrelated males cooperate to herd single females. Multiple first-order alliances cooperate in teams (second-order alliances) in the pursuit and defense of females, and multiple teams also work together (third-order alliances). Yet it remains unknown how dolphins classify these nested alliance relationships. We used 30 years of behavioural data combined with 40 contemporary sound...

Recent activity in expanding populations and purifying selection have shaped transposable element landscapes across natural accessions of the Mediterranean grass Brachypodium distachyon

Christoph Stritt, Sean P Gordon, Thomas Wicker, John P Vogel & Anne C Roulin
Transposable element (TE) activity has emerged as a major cause of variation in genome size and structure among species. To what extent TEs contribute to genetic variation and divergence within species, however, is much less clear, mainly because population genomic data have so far only been available for the classical model organisms. In this study, we use the annual Mediterranean grass Brachypodium distachyon to investigate TE dynamics in natural populations. Using whole-genome sequencing data for...

A liposome assay showing the absence of scrambling in TTYH proteins and a lipidomics analysis of TTYH2

Anastasiia Sukalskaia & Raimund Dutzler
The Tweety homologues (TTYHs) are members of a conserved family of eukaryotic membrane proteins that are abundant in the brain. The three human paralogs were assigned to function as anion channels that are either activated by Ca2+ or cell swelling. To uncover their unknown architecture and its relationship to function, we have determined the structures of human TTYH1–3 by cryo-electron microscopy. All structures display equivalent features of a dimeric membrane protein that contains five transmembrane...

Accompanied versus unaccompanied walking for continuous oxygen saturation measurement during 6-min walk test in COPD: A randomised cross-over study

Thomas F. Riegler, Anja Frei, Sarah R. Haile & Thomas Radtke
Is there is a difference in the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) distance when the assessor accompanies the patient to continuously measure oxygen saturation (SpO2) compared to the patient walking unaccompanied? We conducted a randomised cross-over study to evaluate the impact of the assessor walking with the patient during 6MWT (6MWTwith) versus patient walking alone (6MWTwithout). At the end of a pulmonary rehabilitation programme, each patient performed two 6MWTs in random order and separated by 30...

Ecology drives the evolution of diverse social strategies in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Alexandre Figueiredo, Andreas Wagner & Rolf Kümmerli
Bacteria often cooperate by secreting molecules that can be shared as public goods between cells. Because the production of public goods is subject to cheating by mutants that exploit the good without contributing to it, there has been great interest in elucidating the evolutionary forces that maintain cooperation. However, little is known on how bacterial cooperation evolves under conditions where cheating is unlikely of importance. Here we use experimental evolution to follow changes in the...

Alternative reproductive tactic in male Drosophila prolongata

Jhoniel Perdigón Ferreira & Stefan Lüpold
Species with intense male-male competition for access to females often show alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) where males of lower competitive ability adopt a sneaky behavior to gain access to mates. These ARTs are usually associated with intrasexual dimorphisms, in that males with distinct morphologies show different tactics. In some cases, however, males adopt different tactics without being dimorphic. Male Drosophila prolongata exhibit continuous variation in body size and shape, with enlarged forelegs that they use...

Electrophysiological recordings showing allosteric modulation of LRRC8 channels by targeting their cytoplasmic domains with specific sybodies

Sonja Rutz, Dawid Deneka, Raimund Dutzler & Marta Sawicka
Members of the LRRC8 family form heteromeric assemblies, which function as volume-regulated anion channels. These modular proteins consist of a transmembrane pore and cytoplasmic leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Despite their known molecular architecture, the mechanism of activation and the role of the LRR domains in this process has remained elusive. Here we have addressed this question by generating synthetic nanobodies, termed sybodies, which target the LRR domain of the obligatory subunit LRRC8A.We used these binders...

Different molecular changes underlie the same phenotypic transition: Origins and consequences of independent shifts to homostyly within species

Emiliano Mora Carrera
The repeated transition from outcrossing to selfing is a key topic in evolutionary biology. However, the molecular basis of such shifts has been rarely examined due to lack of knowledge of the genes controlling these transitions. A classic example of mating system transition is the repeated shift from heterostyly to homostyly. Occurring in 28 angiosperm families, heterostyly is characterized by the reciprocal position of male and female sexual organs in two (or three) distinct, usually...

African wild dog access to kills

Neil Jordan, Krystyna Golabek, Dominik Behr, Reena Walker, Laura Plimpton, Samantha Lostrom, Megan Claase, Leanne Van Der Weyde & J. Weldon McNutt
Patterns of food sharing in collectively hunting species are likely to influence social dynamics and evolution. Despite this, little is known about competition within social groups at carcasses and other food sources, making the social drivers and implications of food sharing difficult to assess. We quantified carcass access and feeding behavior in free-ranging African wild dogs, Lycaon pictus, at natural kill sites, confirming and quantifying previous descriptions of a youngest-feed-first system. Using data on feeding...

Time-Optimal Planning for Quadrotor Waypoint Flight

Philipp Foehn, Angel Romero & Davide Scaramuzza
Quadrotors are amongst the most agile flying robots. However, planning time-optimal trajectories at the actuation limit through multiple waypoints remains an open problem. This is crucial for applications such as inspection, delivery, search and rescue, and drone racing. Early works used polynomial trajectory formulations, which do not exploit the full actuator potential due to their inherent smoothness. Recent works resorted to numerical optimization, but require waypoints to be allocated as costs or constraints at specific...

Life-history responses of a freshwater rotifer to copper pollution

Federica R. Schanz, Stefan Sommer, Andrea Lami, Diego Fontaneto & Arpat Ozgul
In organisms with dormant stages, life-history responses to past pollution can be studied retrospectively. Here, we study such responses in a rotifer (Brachionus calyciflorus) from the once heavily copper-polluted Lake Orta (Italy). We extracted resting eggs from sediments, established clonal lineages from hatchlings, and exposed newborns of these lineages to one of three copper concentrations that each mimicked a specific period in the lake’s pollution history. For each rotifer, we daily collected life-table data. We...

Decline and Fall: the causes of group failure in cooperatively breeding meerkats

Christopher Duncan, Marta Manser & Tim Clutton-Brock
In many social vertebrates, variation in group persistence exerts an important effect on individual fitness and population demography. However, few studies have been able to investigate the failure of groups or the causes of the variation in their longevity. We use data from a long-term study of cooperatively breeding meerkats, Suricata suricatta, to investigate the different causes of group failure and the factors that drive these processes. Many newly formed groups failed within a year...

Folding and unfolding of the tryptophan zipper in the presence of two thioamide substitutions

Jan Helbing, Jasmin Spekowius & Rolf Pfister
We studied the stability and folding and unfolding kinetics of the tryptophan zipper, containing dierent double thioamide subsitutions. Conformation change was triggered by photoisomerization of an integrated AMPP photoswitch in the turn region of the hairpin, and transient spectra were recorded in the deep UV and the mid-IR, covering the time window of the (un)folding transition from picoseconds to tens of microseconds. Thio-substitution of inward-pointing backbone carbonyls was found to strongly destabilize the β-hairpin structures,...

Ecological causes of fluctuating natural selection on habitat choice in an amphibian

Joseph Van Buskirk & David C. Smith
We estimated natural selection targeting three traits related to habitat choice in a frog (Pseudacris maculata) breeding in pools on the rocky shores of Isle Royale, Michigan, over 16 years. Our aim was to identify the form and ecological causes of annual variation in directional and correlational selection as expressed in the survival and growth of tadpoles. We found directional selection favoring early breeding, but pool choice was under weak stabilizing selection. However, the form...

Data from: Evolution of dispersal, habit, and pollination in Africa pushed Apocynaceae diversification after the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition

Nicolai M. Nürk, Cássia Bitencourt, Alessandro Rapini, Mark Fishbein, André O. Simões, David J. Middleton, Ulrich Meve, Mary E. Endress & Sigrid Liede-Schumann
Apocynaceae (the dogbane and milkweed family) is one of the ten largest flowering plant families, with approximately 5,350 species and diverse morphology and ecology, ranging from large trees and lianas that are emblematic of tropical rainforests, to herbs in temperate grasslands, to succulents in dry, open landscapes, and to vines in a wide variety of habitats. Despite a specialized and conservative basic floral architecture, Apocynaceae are hyperdiverse in flower size, corolla shape, and especially derived...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    59

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    59

Affiliations

  • University of Zurich
    59
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
    6
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • Leipzig University
    3
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    2
  • McGill University
    2
  • Swiss Ornithological Institute
    2
  • University of Helsinki
    2
  • Botswana Predator Conservation Trust
    2
  • State University of Campinas
    2