153 Works

Data for: Spontaneous choices for insect-pollinated flower shapes by wild non-eusocial halictid bees

Scarlett Howard, Kit Prendergast, Matthew Symonds, Mani Shrestha & Adrian Dyer
The majority of angiosperms require animal pollination for reproduction and insects are the dominant group of animal pollinators. Bees are considered one of the most important and abundant insect pollinators. Research into bee behaviour and foraging decisions has typically centred on managed eusocial bee species, Apis mellifera and Bombus terrestris. Non-eusocial bees are understudied with respect to foraging strategies and decision-making, such as flower preferences. Understanding whether there are fundamental foraging strategies and preferences which...

Counting the bodies: estimating the numbers and spatial variation of Australian reptiles, birds and mammals killed by two invasive mesopredators

Alyson Stobo-Wilson, Brett Murphy, Sarah Legge, Hernan Caceres-Escobar, David Chapple, Heather Crawford, Stuart Dawson, Chris Dickman, Tim Doherty, Patricia Fleming, Stephen Garnett, Matthew Gentle, Thomas Newsome, Russell Palmer, Matthew Rees, Euan Ritchie, James Speed, John-Michael Stuart, Andres Suarez-Castro, Eilysh Thompson, Ayesha Tulloch, Jeff Turpin & John Woinarski
Aim: Introduced predators negatively impact biodiversity globally, with insular fauna often most severely affected. Here, we assess spatial variation in the number of terrestrial vertebrates (excluding amphibians) killed by two mammalian mesopredators introduced to Australia, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cat (Felis catus). We aim to identify prey groups that suffer especially high rates of predation, and regions where losses to foxes and/or cats are most substantial. Location: Australia Methods: We draw information...

Effectiveness of community-based health education and home support program to reduce blood pressure among patients with uncontrolled hypertension in Nepal: A cluster-randomized trial

Mahesh Kumar Khanal, Pratiksha Bhandari, Raja Ram Dhungana, Pratik Bhandari, Lal Rawal, Yadav Gurung, K. N. Paudel, Amit Singh, Surya Devkota & Barbora De Courten
Background: Hypertension is a major global public health problem. Elevated blood pressure can cause cardiovascular and kidney diseases. We assessed the effectiveness of health education sessions and home support programs in reducing blood pressure among patients with uncontrolled hypertension in a suburban community of Nepal. Methods: We conducted a community-based, open-level, parallel-group, cluster randomized controlled trial in Birendranagar municipality of Surkhet, Nepal. We randomly assigned four clusters (wards) into intervention and control arms. We provided...

Civil war is associated with longer escape distances among Sri Lankan birds - flight-initiation distances of Sri Lankan birds

Michael Weston & Matthew Symonds
War influences wildlife in a variety of ways but may influence their escape responses to approaching threats, including humans, because of its effect on human populations and behaviour, and landscape change. We collected 1,400 Flight-Initiation Distances (FIDs) from 157 bird species in the dry zone of Sri Lanka, where civil war raged for 26 years, ending in 2009. Accounting for factors known to influence FIDs (phylogeny, starting distance of approaches, body mass, prevailing human density,...

Chronic insomnia and bed partner actigraphy data

Maia Angelova, Shitanshu Kusmakar, Chandan Karmakar, Ye Zhu, Sergiy Shelyag, Sean Drummond & Jason Ellis
The files contain seven nights of continuous actigraphy measurements of 40 subjects with chronic insomnia and their 40 bed partners. Wrist actigraphy was used, collected for one week using Respironics Actiwatch Spectrum Pro and Actiware software (Respironics, Bend, OR, USA), with movement counts were sampled in 60-second epochs. All recruited subjects wore the devices at all times during day and night. All subjects were free to move and were not prohibited from doing any activities...

Microplastics monitoring protocol in surface waters

Alessandra Sutti
This project aims at Beta-testing the "Microplastics monitoring protocol in surface waters" developed by Deakin University in collaboration with Labter-Crea MN and Globe Italia. As part of the project, students and teachers will be trained on a newly-established image dataset that allows recognition of common items expected to be present in surface waters. This dataset includes a selection of naturally occurring particles. These could be of biological or mineral origin.

Prospective associations between life stress, allostatic load, and combined modifiable lifestyle behaviours over 12-year in the Longitudinal Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study

Vooi Khong (Raymond) Siew
The research seek to examine the effect of life stress at baseline on the development of allostatic load at 12-year follow-up, and to determine the extent to which combined modifiable lifestyle behaviours mediate this association using community dwelling adults (≥25 years) from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study. The Australian National Health Survey found an upward trend in prevalence of psychological distress among Australian adults from 2014 to 2018. It was estimated that...

Prospective associations between work stress, allostatic load, and combined modifiable lifestyle behaviours over 12 years in the Personality and Total Health (PATH) Through Life study

Vooi Khong (Raymond) Siew
The aim of this study is to examine the effect of work stress at baseline on the development of allostatic load at 12-year follow-up, and to determine the extent to which combined modifiable lifestyle behaviours mediate this association using the Australian PATH Through Life study. The data was collected by a group of researchers across Australian institutions such as University of New South Wales and Australian National University. The data was collected using validated instruments...

Data for meta-analysis and systematic review from tactile-mediated vection research

Lars Kooijman, Houshyar Asadi, Shady Mohamed & Saeid Nahavandi

Data from: Signatures of polygenic adaptation associated with climate across the range of a threatened fish species with high genetic connectivity

Katherine A. Harrisson, Stephen J. Amish, Alexandra Pavlova, Shawn R. Narum, Marina Telonis-Scott, Meaghan L. Rourke, Jarod Lyon, Zeb Tonkin, Dean M. Gilligan, Brett A. Ingram, Mark Lintermans, Han Ming Gan, Christopher M. Austin, Gordon Luikart & Paul Sunnucks
Adaptive differences across species’ ranges can have important implications for population persistence and conservation management decisions. Despite advances in genomic technologies, detecting adaptive variation in natural populations remains challenging. Key challenges in gene-environment association studies involve distinguishing the effects of drift from those of selection, and identifying subtle signatures of polygenic adaptation. We used paired-end restriction-site associated-DNA sequencing data (6605 biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) to examine population structure and test for signatures of adaptation...

Data from: A genetic perspective on rapid evolution in cane toads (Rhinella marina)

Lee Ann Rollins, Mark F. Richardson & Richard Shine
The process of biological invasion exposes a species to novel pressures, in terms of both the environments it encounters and the evolutionary consequences of range expansion. Several invaders have been shown to exhibit rapid evolutionary changes in response to those pressures, thus providing robust opportunities to clarify the processes at work during rapid phenotypic transitions. The accelerating pace of invasion of cane toads (Rhinella marina) in tropical Australia during its 80-year history has been well...

Data from: An Ishihara-style test of animal colour vision

Karen L. Cheney, Naomi.F. Green, Alexander P. Vibert, Misha Vorobyev, Justin Marshall, Daniel C. Osorio & John A. Endler
Colour vision mediates ecologically relevant tasks for many animals, such as mate choice, foraging and predator avoidance. However, our understanding of animal colour perception is largely derived from human psychophysics, even though animal visual systems differ from our own. Behavioural tests of non-human animals are required to understand how colour signals are perceived by them. Here we introduce a novel test of colour vision in animals inspired by the Ishihara colour charts, which are widely...

Data from: Climate-driven mitochondrial selection: a test in Australian songbirds

Annika M. Lamb, Han Ming Gan, Chris Greening, Leo Joseph, Yin P. Lee, Alejandra Morán-Ordóñez & Paul Sunnucks
Diversifying selection between populations that inhabit different environments can promote lineage divergence within species and ultimately drive speciation. The mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) encodes essential proteins of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system and can be a strong target for climate-driven selection (i.e. associated with inhabiting different climates). We investigated whether Pleistocene climate changes drove mitochondrial selection and evolution within Australian birds. First, using phylogeographic analyses of the mitochondrial ND2 gene for 17 songbird species, we identified...

Data from: Ocean currents, individual movements and genetic structuring of populations

Luis Cardona & Graeme C. Hays
Ocean currents profoundly impact all life in the oceans and over a broad size spectra species may show both horizontal and vertical movements to stay on preferred locations. As a corollary it might be expected that individuals in preferred oceanic habitats may simply drift with flows. We explored these scenarios by both satellite tracking young pelagic loggerhead turtles and examining the genetic structuring of individuals on coastal foraging areas across the Mediterranean in relation to...

Data from: The causes and ecological correlates of head scale asymmetry and fragmentation in a tropical snake

Gregory P. Brown, Thomas Madsen, Sylvain Dubey & Rick Shine
The challenge of identifying the proximate causes and ecological consequences of phenotypic variation can be facilitated by studying traits that are usually but not always bilaterally symmetrical; deviations from symmetry likely reflect disrupted embryogenesis. Based on a 19-year mark-recapture study of >1300 slatey-grey snakes (Stegonotus cucullatus) in tropical Australia, and incubation of >700 eggs, we document developmental and ecological correlates of two morphological traits: asymmetry and fragmentation of head scales. Asymmetry was directional (more scales...

Data from: Artificial selection for food colour preferences

John A. Endler & Gemma L. Cole
Colour is an important factor in food detection and acquisition by animals using visually based foraging. Colour can be used to identify the suitability of a food source or improve the efficiency of food detection, and can even be linked to mate choice. Food colour preferences are known to exist, but whether these preferences are heritable and how these preferences evolve is unknown. Using the freshwater fish Poecilia reticulata, we artificially selected for chase behaviour...

Data from: Web building and silk properties functionally covary among species of wolf spider

Mariángeles Lacava, Arley Camargo, Luiz F. Garcia, Martin Santana, Jian Fang, Xungai Wang & Sean J. Blamires
While phylogenetic studies have shown covariation between the properties of spider major ampullate (MA) silk and web building, both spider webs and silks are highly plastic so we cannot be sure whether these traits functionally co-vary or just vary across environments that the spiders occupy. Since MaSp2-like proteins provide MA silk with greater extensibility, their presence is considered necessary for spider webs to effectively capture prey. Wolf spiders (Lycosidae) are predominantly non-web building, but a...

Predator responses to fire: a global systematic review and meta-analysis

William Geary, Tim Doherty, Dale Nimmo, Ayesha Tulloch & Euan Ritchie
1. Knowledge of how disturbances such as fire shape habitat structure and composition, and affect animal interactions, is fundamental to ecology and ecosystem management. Predators also exert strong effects on ecological communities, through top-down regulation of prey and competitors, which can result in trophic cascades. Despite their ubiquity, ecological importance and potential to interact with fire, our general understanding of how predators respond to fire remains poor, hampering ecosystem management. 2. To address this important...

A framework for mapping the distribution of seabirds by integrating tracking, demography and phenology

Ana P. B. Carneiro, Elizabeth J. Pearmain, Steffen Oppel, Thomas A. Clay, Richard A. Phillips, Anne-Sophie Bonnet-Lebrun, Ross M. Wanless, Edward Abraham, Yvan Richard, Joel Rice, Jonathan Handley, Tammy E. Davies, Ben J. Dilley, Peter G. Ryan, Cleo Small, Javier Arata, John P. Y. Arnould, Elizabeth Bell, Leandro Bugoni, Letizia Campioni, Paulo Catry, Jaimie Cleeland, Lorna Deppe, Graeme Elliott, Amanda Freeman … & Maria P. Dias
1. The identification of geographic areas where the densities of animals are highest across their annual cycles is a crucial step in conservation planning. In marine environments, however, it can be particularly difficult to map the distribution of species, and the methods used are usually biased towards adults, neglecting the distribution of other life-history stages even though they can represent a substantial proportion of the total population. 2. Here we develop a methodological framework for...

Escape responses of terrestrial and aquatic birds to drones: towards a code of practice to minimise disturbance

Michael Weston, Curtis O'Brien, Kristal Kostoglou & Matthew Symonds
1. Advances in human technology can lead to widespread and rapid increases in interactions between wildlife and potentially disturbing stimuli. The recreational use of drones is widespread and increasing, yet laws and codes of practice which aim to manage deleterious impacts (e.g. negative interactions with wildlife) are reactionary, unscientific and inadequate. 2. One prominent potential negative effect of drones interacting with birds is disturbance, the disruption of normal states caused by responses such as escape....

Signatures of selection in a recent invasion reveals adaptive divergence in a highly vagile invasive species

Katarina Stuart, Adam Cardilini, Phillip Cassey, Mark Richardson, William Sherwin, Lee Rollins & Craig Sherman
A detailed understanding of population genetics in invasive populations helps us to identify drivers of successful alien introductions. Here, we investigate putative signals of selection in Australian populations of invasive common starlings, Sturnus vulgaris, and seek to understand how these have been influenced by introduction history. We used reduced representation sequencing to determine population structure, and identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) that are putatively under selection. We found that since their introduction into Australia, starling...

Westland petrel data combined GPS and accelerometer data 2016 & 2017

Timothee Poupart, Susan Waugh, Akiko Kato & John Arnould
This study investigated the foraging niche of dimorphic males and females Westland petrel during the chick-rearing period. At-sea movements were recorded with GPS, behaviours and foraging behaviour were recorded with accelerometers, and trophic niche was inferred with stable isotopes (carbon, nitrogen). Altogether, these fine-scale data allowed to look at the foraging niche used by males and females.

Kimberley Fish microsatellite genotypes

Adam Miller & Owen Holland
Dispersal is a critically important process that dictates population persistence, gene flow and evolutionary potential and is an essential element for identifying species conservation risks. This project aims to investigate the contributions of dispersal syndromes and hydrographic barriers on patterns of population connectivity and genetic structure in fishes occupying the particularly rugged and fragmented landscape of the Kimberley Plateau, Western Australia. We assessed population genetic structure between three neighbouring catchments (the Mitchell, King Edward and...

Data from: Network analysis of sea turtle movements and connectivity: a tool for conservation prioritization

Connie Y. Kot, Susanne Åkesson, Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto, Diego Fernando Amorocho Llanos, Marina Antonopoulou, George H. Balazs, Warren R. Baverstock, Janice M. Blumenthal, Annette C. Broderick, Ignacio Bruno, Ali Fuat Canbolat, Paolo Casale, Daniel Cejudo, Michael S. Coyne, Corrie Curtice, Sarah DeLand, Andrew DiMatteo, Kara Dodge, Daniel C. Dunn, Nicole Esteban, Angela Formia, Mariana M. P. B. Fuentes, Ei Fujioka, Julie Garnier, Matthew H. Godfrey … & Patrick N. Halpin
Aim: Understanding the spatial ecology of animal movements is a critical element in conserving long-lived, highly mobile marine species. Analysing networks developed from movements of six sea turtle species reveals marine connectivity and can help prioritize conservation efforts. Location: Global. Methods: We collated telemetry data from 1,235 individuals and reviewed the literature to determine our dataset’s representativeness. We used the telemetry data to develop spatial networks at different scales to examine areas, connections, and their...

Data from: Ecological and environmental predictors of escape among birds on a large tropical island

Kasun B. Ekanayake, Jonathan J. Gnanapragasam, Kithsiri Ranawana, Dulan R. Vidanapathirana, U. Tiran Abeyawardhana, Chandima Fernando, Alexandra McQueen, Michael A. Weston & Matthew R.E. Symonds
Ecological and environmental traits can influence avian escape behaviour but most data underpinning our current understanding relates to continental and temperate areas and species. We conducted a phylogenetically controlled comparative analysis of flight-initation distance (FID) against a variety of environmental, behavioural and life-history attributes for Sri Lankan birds (202 species; n = 2540). As with other studies, body mass was positively associated with FID, and longer FIDs occurred in areas where human population density was...

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