15 Works

Data from: Evolutionary rescue in a host-pathogen system results in coexistence not clearance

Mark Redpath Christie & Catherine Laura Searle
The evolutionary rescue of host populations may prevent extinction from novel pathogens. However, the conditions that facilitate rapid evolution of hosts, in particular the population variation in host susceptibility, and the effects of host evolution in response to pathogens on population outcomes remain largely unknown. We constructed an individual-based model to determine the relationships between genetic variation in host susceptibility and population persistence in an amphibian-fungal pathogen (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) system. We found that host populations...

Data from: Using linkage maps as a tool to determine patterns of chromosome synteny in the genus Salvelinus

Matthew C. Hale, Garrett J. McKinney, Courtney L. Bell & Krista M. Nichols
Next generation sequencing techniques have revolutionized the collection of genome and transcriptome data from non-model organisms. This manuscript details the application of restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) to generate a marker dense genetic map for Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). The consensus map was constructed from three full-sib families totaling 176 F1 individuals. The map consisted of 42 linkage groups with a total female map size of 2502.5 cM, and a total male map size...

Data from: Using multi-response models to investigate pathogen coinfections across scales: insights from emerging diseases of amphibians

William E. Stutz, Andrew R. Blaustein, Cheryl J. Briggs, Jason T. Hoverman, Jason R. Rhor & Pieter T. J. Johnson
1.Associations among parasites affect many aspects of host-parasite dynamics, but a lack of analytical tools has limited investigations of parasite correlations in observational data that are often nested across spatial and biological scales. 2.Here we illustrate how hierarchical, multiresponse modeling can characterize parasite associations by allowing for hierarchical structuring, offering estimates of uncertainty, and incorporating correlational model structures. After introducing the general approach, we apply this framework to investigate coinfections among four amphibian parasites (the...

Data from: A three decade assessment of climate-associated changes in forest composition across the north-eastern USA

Arun K. Bose, Aaron Weiskittel & Robert G. Wagner
1. Climate-associated changes in forest composition have been widely reported, particularly where changes in abiotic conditions have resulted in high mortality of sensitive species and have disproportionately favored certain species better adapted to these newer conditions. In the northeastern USA and southeastern Canada, few studies have examined climate-related influences associated on forest composition, and none have considered broad-scale changes over a long temporal (>25 years) period. 2. We used US Forest Service Forest Inventory and...

Data from: What makes a multimodal signal attractive? A preference function approach

Kelly L. Ronald, Ruiyu Zeng, David J. White, Esteban Fernández-Juricic & Jeffrey R. Lucas
Courtship signals are often complex and include components within and across sensory modalities. Unfortunately, the evidence for how multimodal signals affect female preference functions is still rather limited. This is an important scientific gap because preference function shape can indicate which male traits are under the strongest selection. We modelled how preference function shape can be altered under 4 scenarios of varying signal content, including both redundant and non-redundant signals. The model was tested with...

Data from: Checkerboard score-area relationships reveal spatial scales of plant community structure

Gordon G. McNickle, Eric G. Lamb, Mike Lavender, , Brandon S. Schamp, Steven D. Siciliano, Richard Condit, Stephen P. Hubbell, Jennifer L. Baltzer & James F Cahill
Identifying the spatial scale at which particular mechanisms influence plant community assembly is crucial to understanding the mechanisms structuring communities. It has long been recognized that many elements of community structure are sensitive to area; however the majority of studies examining patterns of community structure use a single relatively small sampling area. As different assembly mechanisms likely cause patterns at different scales we investigate how plant species co-occurrence patterns change with sampling unit scale. We...

Data from: Increased power to dissect adaptive traits in global sorghum diversity using a nested association mapping population

Sophie Bouchet, Marcus O. Olatoye, Sandeep R. Marla, Ramasamy Perumal, Tesfaye Tesso, Jianming Yu, Mitch Tuinstra & Geoffrey P. Morris
Adaptation of domesticated species to diverse agroclimatic regions has led to abundant trait diversity. However, the resulting population structure and genetic heterogeneity confounds association mapping of adaptive traits. To address this challenge in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]—a widely adapted cereal crop—we developed a nested association mapping (NAM) population using 10 diverse global lines crossed with an elite reference line RTx430. We characterized the population of 2214 recombinant inbred lines at 90,000 SNPs using genotyping-by-sequencing....

Data from: Why does it take two to tango? lifetime fitness consequences of parental care in a burying beetle

Ashlee N. Smith, J. Curtis Creighton & Mark C. Belk
In species that require parental care, each parent can either care for their offspring or leave them in the care of the other parent. For each parent this creates three possible parental care strategies: biparental care, uniparental (male or female) care, and uniparental desertion by either the male or female. The burying beetle, Nicrophorus orbicollis, typically exhibits biparental care of offspring, and thus provides a unique system that allows us to compare the fitness benefits...

Data from: Evolved pesticide tolerance influences susceptibility to parasites in amphibians

Jessica Hua, Vanessa P. Wuerthner, Devin K. Jones, Brian Mattes, Rickey D. Cothran, Rick A. Relyea & Jason T. Hoverman
Because ecosystems throughout the globe are contaminated with pesticides, there is a need to understand how natural populations cope with pesticides and the implications for ecological interactions. From an evolutionary perspective, there is evidence that pesticide tolerance can be achieved via two mechanisms: selection for constitutive tolerance over multiple generations or by inducing tolerance within a single generation via phenotypic plasticity. While both mechanisms can allow organisms to persist in contaminated environments, they might result...

Data from: Scatterhoarders drive long- and short-term population dynamics of a nut-producing tree, while pre-dispersal seed predators and herbivores have little effect

Elise C. Elwood, Nathanael I. Lichti, Sara F. Fitzsimmons & Harmony J. Dalgleish
1.Both seed predators and herbivores can have profound effects on individual plant growth, reproduction and survival, but their population level effects are less well understood. While most plants interact with a suite of seed predators and herbivores over their life cycle, few studies incorporate the effects of multiple interacting partners and multiple life stages on plant population growth. 2.We constructed a matrix model using six years of data from a rare, seed-producing population of American...

Data from: Novel loci underlie natural variation in vitamin E levels in maize grain

Christine H. Diepenbrock, Catherine B. Kandianis, Alexander E. Lipka, Maria Magallanes-Lundback, Brieanne Vaillancourt, Elsa Góngora-Castillo, Jason G. Wallace, Jason Cepela, Alex Mesberg, Peter J. Bradbury, Daniel C. Ilut, Maria Mateos-Hernandez, John Hamilton, Brenda F. Owens, Tyler Tiede, Edward S. Buckler, Rocheford Torbert, C. Robin Buell, Michael A. Gore & Dean DellaPenna
Tocopherols, tocotrienols and plastochromanols (collectively termed tocochromanols) are lipid-soluble antioxidants synthesized by all plants. Their dietary intake, primarily from seed oils, provides vitamin E and other health benefits. Tocochromanol biosynthesis has been dissected in the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana, which has green, photosynthetic seeds, but our understanding of tocochromanol accumulation in major crops, whose seeds are non-photosynthetic, remains limited. To understand the genetic control of tocochromanols in grain, we conducted a joint linkage and genome-wide association...

Data from: Planting of neonicotinoid-treated maize poses risks for honey bees and other non-target organisms over a wide area without consistent crop yield benefit

Christian H. Krupke, Jeffrey D. Holland, Elizabeth Y. Long & Brian D. Eitzer
Neonicotinoid insecticides are routinely used as seed treatments on most grain and oilseed crops in the USA, yet the extent and likelihood of spread of insecticide residues during planting has not previously been quantified. Honey bees, Apis mellifera, are highly mobile and highly sensitive to neonicotinoid residues, presenting an opportunity to estimate non-target exposures to neonicotinoids in mobile insects. We measured neonicotinoid dust drift during maize sowing and used sites of maize fields, apiary locations...

Data from: Inbreeding and selection shape genomic diversity in captive populations: implications for the conservation of endangered species

Janna R. Willoughby, Jamie A. Ivy, Robert C. Lacy, Jaqueline M. Doyle, J. Andrew DeWoody & Jacqueline M. Doyle
Captive breeding programs are often initiated to prevent species extinction until reintroduction into the wild can occur. However, the evolution of captive populations via inbreeding, drift, and selection can impair fitness, compromising reintroduction programs. To better understand the evolutionary response of species bred in captivity, we used nearly 5500 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in populations of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) to measure the impact of breeding regimes on genomic diversity. We bred mice in captivity...

Data from: Captive ancestry upwardly biases estimates of relative reproductive success

Janna R. Willoughby & Mark R. Christie
Supplementation programs, which release captive-born individuals into the wild, are commonly used to demographically bolster declining populations. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs, the reproductive success of captive-born individuals released into the wild is often compared to the reproductive success of wild-born individuals in the recipient population (relative reproductive success, RRS). However, if there are heritable reductions in fitness associated with captive breeding, gene flow from captive-born individuals into the wild population...

Data from: Confirmation of independent introductions of an exotic plant pathogen of Cornus species, Discula destructiva, on the east and west coasts of North America

Kristie Mantooth, Denita Hadziabdic, Sarah Boggess, Mark Windham, Stephen Miller, Cai Guohong, Joseph Spatafora, Ning Zhang, Meg Staton, Bonnie Ownley, Robert Trigiano & Guohong Cai
Cornus florida (flowering dogwood) and C. nuttallii (Pacific dogwood) are North American native tree species that belong to the big-bracted group of dogwoods. Cornus species are highly valued for their ornamental characteristics, and have fruits that contain high fat content for animals. Also, they are an important understory tree in natural forests. Dogwood anthracnose, caused by Discula destructiva, was observed in the late 1970s on the east and west coasts of the United States and...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    15

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    15

Affiliations

  • Purdue University
    15
  • Wilfrid Laurier University
    2
  • Oregon State University
    2
  • Binghamton University
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1
  • The Ohio State University
    1
  • University of Saskatchewan
    1
  • Algoma University
    1
  • University of Alberta
    1
  • University of Maine
    1