3 Works

Data from: Energy conserving thermoregulatory patterns and lower disease severity in a bat resistant to the impacts of white-nose syndrome

Marianne S. Moore, Kenneth A. Field, Melissa J. Behr, Gregory G. Turner, Morgan E. Furze, Daniel W. F. Stern, Paul R. Allegra, Sarah A. Bouboulis, Chelsey D. Musante, Megan E. Vodzak, Matthew E. Biron, Melissa B. Meierhofer, Winifred F. Frick, Jeffrey T. Foster, Daryl Howell, Joseph A. Kath, Allen Kurta, Gerda Nordquist, Joseph S. Johnson, Thomas M. Lilley, Benjamin W. Barrett & DeeAnn M. Reeder
The devastating bat fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS), does not appear to affect all species equally. To experimentally determine susceptibility differences between species, we exposed hibernating naïve little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) and big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) to the fungus that causes WNS, Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd). After hibernating under identical conditions, Pd lesions were significantly more prevalent and more severe in little brown myotis. This species difference in pathology correlates with susceptibility to WNS...

Data from: Immune responses in hibernating little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) with white-nose syndrome

Thomas M. Lilley, Jenni M. Prokkola, Joseph S. Johnson, Elizabeth J. Rogers, Sarah Gronsky, Allen Kurta, DeeAnn M. Reeder & Kenneth A. Field
White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fungal disease responsible for decimating many bat populations in North America. Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), the psychrophilic fungus responsible for WNS, prospers in the winter habitat of many hibernating bat species. The immune response that Pd elicits in bats is not yet fully understood; antibodies are produced in response to infection by Pd, but they may not be protective and indeed may be harmful. To understand how bats respond to infection...

Data from: Plant functional traits and environmental conditions shape community assembly and ecosystem functioning during restoration

Chad R. Zirbel, Tyler Basset, Emily Grman, Lars A. Brudvig & Tyler Bassett
Recovering biological diversity and ecosystem functioning are primary objectives of ecological restoration, yet these outcomes are often unpredictable. Assessments based on functional traits may help with interpreting variability in both community composition and ecosystem functioning because of their mechanistic and generalizable nature. This promise remains poorly realized, however, because tests linking environmental conditions, functional traits, and ecosystem functioning in restoration are rare. Here, we provide such a test through what is to our knowledge the...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Eastern Michigan University
    3
  • Bucknell University
    2
  • Department of Plant Biology
    1
  • Ohio University
    1
  • University of New Hampshire
    1
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    1
  • Northern Arizona University
    1
  • Iowa Department of Natural Resources
    1
  • Arizona State University
    1
  • University of California, Santa Cruz
    1