17 Works

Data from: Past and present dynamics of sorghum and pearl millet diversity in Mount Kenya region

Vanesse Labeyrie, Monique Deu, Yann Dussert, Bernard Rono, Françoise Lamy, Charles Marangu, Dan Kiambi, Caroline Calatayud, Geo Coppens D’Eeckenbrugge, Thierry Robert, Christian Leclerc & Geo Coppens D'Eeckenbrugge
Crop populations in smallholder farming systems are shaped by the interaction of biological, ecological and social processes, occurring on different spatiotemporal scales. Understanding these dynamics is fundamental for the conservation of crop genetic resources. In this paper we investigated the processes involved in sorghum and pearl millet diversity dynamics on Mount Kenya. Surveys were conducted in ten sites distributed along two elevation transects and occupied by six ethnolinguistic groups. Varieties of both species grown in...

Data from: Invasion history and demographic processes associated with rapid morphological changes in the Red-whiskered bulbul established on tropical islands

Ariane Le Gros, Philippe Clergeau, Dario Zuccon, Raphaël Cornette, Blake Mathys & Sarah Samadi
The Red-whiskered bulbul is a very successful invasive bird species. Morphological differences have been reported among individuals inhabiting the humid and dry coasts of Reunion Island, in a 30-year-old population. This suggests a capacity for rapid local adaptation which could explain the general invasive success of this species. However, the origin and invasion history of this population is unknown. It is therefore not possible to establish with certainty the cause of these morphological differences. Here,...

Data from: Factors essential for L,D-transpeptidase-mediated peptidoglycan cross-linking and β-lactam resistance in Escherichia coli

Christiane Bouchier, Jean-Emmanuel Hugonnet, Michel Arthur, Dominique Mengin-Lecreulx, Yves Brun, Michael Van Nieuwenhze, Louis B Rice, Alejandro Monton, Tanneke Den Blaauwen, Etienne Carbonnelle, Carole Veckerlé & Kuyek Tu
The target of β-lactam antibiotics is the D,D-transpeptidase activity of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) for synthesis of 4→3 cross-links in the peptidoglycan of bacterial cell walls. Unusual 3→3 cross-links formed by L,D-transpeptidases were first detected in Escherichia coli more than four decades ago, however no phenotype has previously been associated with their synthesis. Here we show that production of the L,D-transpeptidase YcbB in combination with elevated synthesis of the (p)ppGpp alarmone by RelA lead to full...

Data from: New material of Palaeoamasia kansui (Embrithopoda, Mammalia) from the Eocene of Turkey and a phylogenetic analysis of Embrithopoda at the species level

Ozan Erdal, Pierre-Olivier Antoine & Sevket Sen
Since the discovery of the megaherbivore Arsinoitherium zitteli Beadnell (early Oligocene of Egypt), the extinct order Embrithopoda has remained an enigmatic group, with disputed affinities among ungulates. In this study, new specimens of Palaeoamasia kansui from the early Palaeogene of Turkey are described and a synthetic dental terminology is proposed for embrithopods. Based on 130 cranial–mandibular and dental characters, the first phylogenetic analysis of embrithopods is carried out in aim to enhance the position of...

Data from: Evidence for parasite-mediated selection during short-lasting toxic algal blooms

François Blanquart, Myriam Valero, Catharina Alves-De-Souza, Aliou Dia, Frédéric Lepelletier, Estelle Bigeard, Christian Jeanthon, Christophe Destombe & Laure Guillou
Parasites play a role in the control of transient algal blooms, but it is not known whether parasite-mediated selection results in coevolution of the host and the parasites over this short time span. We investigated the presence of coevolution between the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum and two naturally occurring endoparasites during blooms lasting a month in two river estuaries, using cross-inoculation experiments across time and space. Higher parasite abundance was associated with a large daily...

Data from: Rapid morphological changes, admixture and invasive success in populations of Ring-necked parakeets (Psittacula krameri) established in Europe

Ariane Le Gros, Sarah Samadi, Dario Zuccon, Raphaël Cornette, Michael P. Braun, Juan Carlos Senar & Philippe Clergeau
The Ring-necked parakeet (Psittacula krameri), native of Asia and Africa, is a very successful invasive species in Europe: it has been present there for over 50 years. A recent study showed that European invasive populations occupy a colder climatic niche than in their native range but the establishment of this tropical species in temperate regions remains unexplained. Two main hypotheses may explain the success of Ring-necked parakeet in Europe: admixture between individuals from different origins...

Data from: The third dimension: a novel set-up for filming coelacanths in their natural environment

Thierry Décamps, Anthony Herrel, Laurent Ballesta, Florian Holon, Thibault Rauby, Yannick Gentil, Cédric Gentil, Hugo Dutel, Regis Debruyne, Jean-Benoit Charrassin, Guillaume Eveillard, Gaël Clément & Marc Herbin
Here, we describe a novel design to obtain three-dimensional data on the movements of aquatic organisms at depths of up to 140 m. The set-up consists of two synchronized high-speed cameras fixed to two articulated arms. The set-up was successfully used to film and quantify the locomotion of coelacanths Latimeria chalumnae living at a depth of about 120 m in Sodwana Bay, South Africa. As an example, the detailed motion of the dorsal fin is...

Data from: Environmental constraints and call evolution in torrent dwelling frogs

Sandra Goutte, Alain Dubois, Samuel David Howard, Rafael Marquez, Jodi J. Rowley, J. Maximilian Dehling, Philippe Grandcolas, Xiong Rongchuan, Frédéric Legendre & Jodi J. L. Rowley
While acoustic signals are important for communication in many taxa, signal propagation is affected by environmental properties. Strong environmental constraints should drive call evolution, favoring signals with greater transmission distance and content integrity in a given calling habitat. Yet, few empirical studies have verified this prediction, possibly due to a shortcoming in habitat characterization, which is often too broad. Here we assess the potential impact of environmental constraints on the evolution of advertisement call in...

Data from: Reinvestigation of Protelytron permianum (Insecta; Early Permian; USA) as an example for applying reflectance transformation imaging to insect imprint fossils

Olivier Béthoux, Artémis Llamosi & Séverine Toussaint
We reinvestigated the holotype of Protelytron permianum, one of the earliest putative stem-dermapteran (i.e. stem-earwig). We recurred to reflectance transformation imaging (RTI) to deliver exhaustive and interactive photographic data. We were able to ascertain the occurrence of broadenings located along veins of the hind wing vannus and forming an arc, as well as a series of radiating folds, alternatively concave and convex. Such an organization is diagnostic of Dermaptera, in which it is indicative of...

Data from: The effects of archipelago spatial structure on island diversity and endemism: predictions from a spatially-structured neutral model

Fanny Gascuel, Fabien Laroche, Anne-Sophie Bonnet-Lebrun & Ana S. L. Rodrigues
Islands are particularly suited to testing hypotheses about the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms underpinning community assembly. Yet the complex spatial arrangements of real island systems have received little attention from both empirical studies and theoretical models. Here, we investigate the extent to which the spatial structure of archipelagos affects species diversity and endemism. We start by proposing a new spatially-structured neutral model that explicitly considers archipelago structure, and then investigate its predictions under a diversity...

Data from: Distinguishing contemporary hybridization from past introgression with postgenomic ancestry-informative SNPs in strongly differentiated Ciona species

Sarah Bouchemousse, Cathy Liautard-Haag, Nicolas Bierne & Frédérique Viard
Biological introductions bring into contact species that can still hybridize. The evolutionary outcomes of such secondary contacts may be diverse (e.g. adaptive introgression from or into the introduced species) but are not yet well examined in the wild. The recent secondary contact between the non-native sea squirt Ciona robusta (formerly known as C. intestinalis type A) and its native congener C. intestinalis (formerly known as C. intestinalis type B), in the Western English Channel, provides...

Data from: Reduced sexual dichromatism, mutual ornamentation, and individual quality in the monogamous Zenaida dove, Zenaida aurita

Aurélie Quinard, Frank Cezilly, Sébastien Motreuil, Jean-Marc Rossi & Clotilde Biard
Although variation in plumage coloration is known to occur both between and within sexes, its study remains limited to a few bird families. The Zenaida dove, Zenaida aurita, is a socially monogamous tropical columbid bird species, characterized by an overall cinnamon-brownish plumage and structural colorations on the head and neck. The species has been described as sexually dichromatic for plumage, although color differences between males and females are not obvious in the field. We investigated...

Data from: How the truffle got its mate: insights from genetic structure in spontaneous and planted Mediterranean populations of Tuber melanosporum

Elisa Taschen, François Rousset, Mathieu Sauve, Laure Benoit, Marie-Pierre Dubois, Franck Richard, Marc-André Selosse, M.-P. Dubois & M.-A. Selosse
The life cycles and dispersal of edible fungi are still poorly known, thus limiting our understanding of their evolution and domestication. The prized Tuber melanosporum produces fruitbodies (fleshy organs where meiospores mature) gathered in natural, spontaneously inoculated forests or harvested in plantations of nursery-inoculated trees. Yet, how fruitbodies are formed remains unclear, thus limiting yields, and how current domestication attempts affect population genetic structure is overlooked. Fruitbodies result from mating between two haploid individuals: the...

Data from: Phylogeography of the small Indian civet and origin of introductions to western Indian Ocean islands

Philippe Gaubert, Riddhi Patel, Geraldine Veron, Steve M. Goodman, Maraike Willsch, Raquel Vasconcelos, Andre Lourenço, Marie Sigaud, Fabienne Justy, Bheem Dutt Joshi, Joerns Fickel & Abdreas Wilting
The biogeographic dynamics affecting the Indian subcontinent, East and Southeast Asia during the Plio-Pleistocene has generated complex biodiversity patterns. We assessed the molecular biogeography of the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica) through mitogenome and cytochrome b + control region sequencing of 89 historical and modern samples to (i) establish a time-calibrated phylogeography across the species’ native range and (ii) test introduction scenarios to western Indian Ocean islands. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified three geographic lineages (East...

Data from: Phenotypic plasticity through transcriptional regulation of the evolutionary hotspot gene tan in Drosophila melanogaster

Jean-Michel Gibert, Emmanuele Mouchel-Vielh, Sandra De Castro & Frederique Peronnet
Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a given genotype to produce different phenotypes in response to distinct environmental conditions. Phenotypic plasticity can be adaptive. Furthermore, it is thought to facilitate evolution. Although phenotypic plasticity is a widespread phenomenon, its molecular mechanisms are only beginning to be unravelled. Environmental conditions can affect gene expression through modification of chromatin structure, mainly via histone modifications, nucleosome remodelling or DNA methylation, suggesting that phenotypic plasticity might partly be due...

Data from: Evolution of haploid–diploid life cycles when haploid and diploid fitnesses are not equal

Michael F. Scott & Marie Rescan
Many organisms spend a significant portion of their life cycle as haploids and as diploids (a haploid–diploid life cycle). However, the evolutionary processes that could maintain this sort of life cycle are unclear. Most previous models of ploidy evolution have assumed that the fitness effects of new mutations are equal in haploids and homozygous diploids, however, this equivalency is not supported by empirical data. With different mutational effects, the overall (intrinsic) fitness of a haploid...

Data from: Body mass-corrected molecular rate for bird mitochondrial DNA

Benoit Nabholz, Robert Lanfear & Jérome Fuchs
Mitochondrial DNA remains one of the most widely used molecular markers to reconstruct the phylogeny and phylogeography of closely related birds. It has been proposed that bird mitochondrial genomes evolve at a constant rate of ~0.01 substitution per site per million years, that is that they evolve according to a strict molecular clock. This molecular clock is often used in studies of bird mitochondrial phylogeny and molecular dating. However, rates of mitochondrial genome evolution vary...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • Sorbonne University
    17
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    7
  • University of Montpellier
    3
  • University of Paris-Sud
    2
  • Paris Diderot University
    2
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • Ghent University
    1
  • Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers
    1
  • Ecologie, Systématique et Evolution
    1
  • Ohio Dominican University
    1