23 Works

Data from: Postcrania of the most primitive euprimate and implications for primate origins

Doug M. Boyer, Séverine Toussaint & Marc Godinot
The fossil record of early primates is largely comprised of dentitions. While teeth can indicate phylogenetic relationships and dietary preferences, they say little about hypotheses pertaining to the positional behavior or substrate preference of the ancestral crown primate. Here we report the discovery of a talus bone of the dentally primitive fossil euprimate Donrussellia provincialis. Our comparisons and analyses indicate that this talus is more primitive than that of other euprimates. It lacks features exclusive...

Data from: State transitions: a major mortality risk for seasonal species

Julie Landes, Martine Perret, Isabelle Hardy, Carlo Giovanni Camarda, Pierre-Yves Henry & Samuel Pavard
Ageing results from the accumulation of multifactorial damage over time. However, the temporal distribution of this damage remains unknown. In seasonal species, transitions between seasons are critical periods of massive physiological remodelling. We hypothesised that these recurrent peaks of physiological remodelling are costly in terms of survival. We tested whether captive small primates exposed to an experimentally increased frequency of seasonal transitions die sooner than individuals living under natural seasonality. The results show that experiencing...

Data from: Hybridization between two cryptic filamentous brown seaweeds along the shore: analysing pre- and post-zygotic barriers in populations of individuals with varying ploidy levels

Alejandro E. Montecinos, Marie L. Guillemin, Lucia Couceiro, Akira F. Peters, Solenn Stoeckel, Myriam Valero & Marie-Laure Guillemin
We aimed to study the importance of hybridization between two cryptic species of the genus Ectocarpus, a group of filamentous algae with haploid-diploid life cycles that include the principal genetic model organism for the brown algae. In haploid-diploid species, the genetic structure of the two phases of the life cycle can be analysed separately in natural populations. Such life cycles provide a unique opportunity to estimate the frequency of hybrid genotypes in diploid sporophytes and...

Data from: Phylotranscriptomic consolidation of the jawed vertebrate timetree

Iker Irisarri, Denis Baurain, Henner Brinkmann, Frédéric Delsuc, Jean-Yves Sire, Alexander Kupfer, Jörn Petersen, Michael Jarek, Axel Meyer, Miguel Vences & Hervé Philippe
Phylogenomics is extremely powerful but introduces new challenges as no agreement exists on “standards” for data selection, curation and tree inference. We use jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata) as model to address these issues. Despite considerable efforts in resolving their evolutionary history and macroevolution, few studies have included a full phylogenetic diversity of gnathostomes and some relationships remain controversial. We tested a novel bioinformatic pipeline to assemble large and accurate phylogenomic datasets from RNA sequencing and find...

Data from: Do trace metals influence visual signals? Effects of trace metals on iridescent and melanic feather colouration in the feral pigeon

Marion Chatelain, Anaïs Pessato, Adrien Frantz, Julien Gasparini & Sarah Leclaire
Trace metals are chemical pollutants of prime concern nowadays given their implication in several human diseases and their noxious effects on wildlife. Previous studies demonstrated their negative (e.g. lead, cadmium) or positive (e.g. zinc) effects on body condition, immunity and reproductive success in birds. Because of their effects on bird condition, trace metals are likely to influence the production of condition-dependent plumage colours, that may be used in mate choice. In the feral pigeon Columba...

Data from: The evolution of dual meat and milk cattle husbandry in Linearbandkeramik societies

Rosalind E. Gillis, Lenka Kovačiková, Stéphanie Brehard, Emilie Guthmann, Ivana Vostrovská, Hana Nohálová, Rose-Marie Arbogast, László Domboróczki, Joachim Pechtl, Alexandra Anders, Arkadiusz Marciniak, Anne Tresset & Jean-Denis Vigne
Cattle dominate archaeozoological assemblages from the north-central Europe between the sixth and fifth millennium BC and are frequently considered as exclusively used for their meat. Dairy products may have played a greater role than previously believed. Selective pressure on the lactase persistence mutation has been modelled to have begun between 6000 and 4000 years ago in central Europe. The discovery of milk lipids in late sixth millennium ceramic sieves in Poland may reflect an isolated...

Data from: Habitat formation prevails over predation in influencing fouling communities

Jean-Charles Leclerc & Frédérique Viard
Coastal human-made structures, such as marinas and harbours, are expanding worldwide. Species assemblages described from these artificial habitats are novel relative to natural reefs, particularly in terms of the abundance of non-indigenous species (NIS). Although these fouling assemblages are clearly distinctive, the ecosystem functioning and species interactions taking place there are little understood. For instance, large predators may influence the fouling community development either directly (feeding on sessile fauna) or indirectly (feeding on small predators...

Data from: Neutron imaging investigation of fossil woods: non-destructive characterization of microstructure and detection of in situ changes as occurring in museum cabinets

Giliane P. Odin, Véronique Rouchon, Frédéric Ott, Nathalie Malikova, Pierre Levitz, Laurent J. Michot & Natalie Malikova
This paper discusses the applicability of neutron imaging techniques for probing the internal microstructure of several fossil woods upon wetting and drying, two phenomena occurring in museum cabinets and endangering the fossil woods. Investigations were carried out using lignites (fossil woods) from two French localities (Rivecourt, Parisian Basin, Oise – Paleogene; Angeac, Aquitanian Basin, Charente – Cretaceous), which present different macroscopic behavior upon drying. Thanks to the high sensitivity of neutrons to hydrogen content, it...

Data from: Balancing yield with resilience and conservation objectives in harvested predator-prey communities

Eric Tromeur & Nicolas Loeuille
The global overexploitation of fish stocks is endangering many marine food webs. Scientists and managers now call for an ecosystem-based fisheries management, able to take into account the complexity of marine ecosystems and the multiple ecosystem services they provide. By contrast, many fishery management plans only focus on maximizing the productivity of harvested stocks. Such practices are suggested to affect other ecosystem services, altering the integrity and resilience of natural communities. Here we show that...

Data from: Breaking the cipher: ant eavesdropping on the variational trail pheromone of its termite prey

Xiao-Lan Wen, Ping Wen, Cecilia A. L. Dahlsjӧ, David Sillam-Dussès & Jan Šobotník
Predators may eavesdrop on their prey using innate signals of varying nature. In regards to social prey, most of the prey signals are derived from social communication and may therefore be highly complex. The most efficient predators select signals that provide the highest benefits. Here, we showed the use of eusocial prey signals by the termite-raiding ant Odontoponera transversa. O. transversa selected the trail pheromone of termites as kairomone in several species of fungus-growing termites...

Data from: Geographically distinct patterns of reproductive isolation and hybridisation in two sympatric species of the Jaera albifrons complex (marine isopods)

Ambre Ribardière, Claire Daguin-Thiébaut, Céline Houbin, Jérôme Coudret, Caroline Broudin, Olivier Timsit & Thomas Broquet
Sympatric species that in some populations hybridize and in other populations remain reproductively isolated open interesting research possibilities for the study of hybridization and speciation. Here we test for such a situation in two littoral isopods (Jaera albifrons and J. praehirsuta) that occur in mixed populations and where past morphological descriptions suggested that the two species are generally reproductively isolated except in rare populations where hybridization may be happening. Using field surveys and microsatellite genetic...

Data from: Climate warming: a loss of variation in populations can accompany reproductive shifts

Manuel Massot, Stephane Legendre, Pierre Fédérici & Jean Clobert
The most documented response of organisms to climate warming is a change in the average timing of seasonal activities (phenology). Although we know that these average changes can differ among species and populations, we do not know whether climate warming impacts within-population variation in phenology. Using data from five study sites collected during a 13-year survey, we found that the increase in spring temperatures is associated with a reproductive advance of 10 days in natural...

Data from: Entangled fates of holobiont genomes during invasion: nested bacterial and host diversities in Caulerpa taxifolia

Sophie Arnaud-Haond, Tania Aires, Rui Candeias, Sara J. L. Teixeira, Carlos M. Duarte, Myriam Valero & Ester A. Serrão
Successful prevention and mitigation of biological invasions requires retracing the initial steps of introduction, as well as understanding key elements enhancing the adaptability of invasive species. We studied the genetic diversity of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia and its associated bacterial communities in several areas around the world. The striking congruence of α and ß diversity of the algal genome and endophytic communities reveals a tight association, supporting the holobiont concept as best describing the...

Data from: Characterizing and comparing the seasonality of influenza-like illnesses and invasive pneumococcal diseases using seasonal waveforms

Matthieu Domenech De Cellès, Helene Arduin, Emmanuelle Varon, Cécile Souty, Pierre-Yves Boëlle, Daniel Lévy-Bruhl, Sylvie Van Der Werf, Jean-Claude Soulary, Didier Guillemot, Laurence Watier & Lulla Opatowski
The seasonalities of influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) and invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPDs) remain incompletely understood. Experimental evidence indicates that influenza-virus infection predisposes to pneumococcal disease, so that a correspondence in the seasonal patterns of ILIs and IPDs might exist at the population level. We developed a method to characterize seasonality by means of easily interpretable summary statistics of seasonal shape—or seasonal waveforms. Non-linear mixed-effects models were used to estimate those waveforms based on weekly case reports...

Data from: Combining niche-shift and population genetic analyses predicts rapid phenotypic evolution during invasion

Erik E. Sotka, Aaron W. Baumgardner, Paige M. Bippus, Claude Destombe, Elizabeth A. Duermit, Hikaru Endo, Ben A. Flanagan, Mits Kamiya, Lauren E. Lees, Courtney J. Murren, Masahiro Nakaoka, Sarah J. Shainker, Allan E. Strand, Ryuta Terada, Myriam Valero, Florian Weinberger, Stacy A. Krueger-Hadfield & Christophe Destombe
Rapid evolution of non-native species can facilitate invasion success, but recent reviews indicate that such microevolution rarely yields expansion of the climatic niche in the introduced habitats. However, because some invasions originate from a geographically restricted portion of the native species range and its climatic niche, it is possible that the frequency, direction and magnitude of phenotypic evolution during invasion has been underestimated. We explored the utility of niche-shift analyses in the red seaweed Gracilaria...

Data from: Mutation rate evolution in partially selfing and partially asexual organisms

Camille Gervais & Denis Roze
Different factors may influence the evolution of the mutation rate of a species: costs associated with DNA replication fidelity, indirect selection caused by the mutations produced (that should generally favor lower mutation rates, given that most mutations affecting fitness are deleterious) and genetic drift, that may render selection acting on weak mutators inefficient. In this paper, we use a two-locus model to compute the strength of indirect selection acting on a modifier locus that affects...

Data from: Ecophysiological variation across a forest-ecotone gradient produces divergent climate change vulnerability within species

Félix Landry Yuan, Adam H. Freedman, Laurent Chirio, Matthew LeBreton & Timothy C. Bonebrake
Climate change related risks and impacts on ectotherms will be mediated by habitats and their influence on local thermal environments. While many studies have documented morphological and genetic aspects of niche divergence across habitats, few have examined thermal performance across such gradients and directly linked this variation to contemporary climate change impacts. In this study, we quantified variation in thermal performance across a gradient from forest to gallery forest-savanna mosaic in Cameroon for a skink...

Data from: Mutualistic mimicry enhances species diversification through spatial segregation and extension of the ecological niche space

Thomas G. Aubier, Marianne Elias, Violaine Llaurens & Nicolas Chazot
Species richness varies among clades, yet the drivers of diversification creating this variation remain poorly understood. While abiotic factors likely drive some of the variation in species richness, ecological interactions may also contribute. Here, we examine one class of potential contributors to species richness variation that is particularly poorly understood: mutualistic interactions. We aim to elucidate large-scale patterns of diversification mediated by mutualistic interactions using a spatially-explicit population-based model. We focus on mutualistic Müllerian mimicry...

Data from: Widespread hybridization within mound-building wood ants in Southern Finland results in cytonuclear mismatches and potential for sex-specific hybrid breakdown

Jack Beresford, Marianne Elias, Lucy Pluckrose, Liselotte Sundström, Roger K. Butlin, Pekka Pamilo & Jonna Kulmuni
Hybridization and gene flow between diverging lineages is increasingly recognized as a common evolutionary process and its consequences can vary from hybrid breakdown to adaptive introgression. We have previously found a population of wood ant hybrids between Formica aquilonia and F. polyctena that shows antagonistic effects of hybridization: females with introgressed alleles show hybrid vigour, whereas males with the same alleles show hybrid breakdown. Here we investigate whether hybridization is a general phenomenon in this...

Data from: Landscape features impact connectivity between soil populations: a comparative study of gene flow in earthworms

Lise Dupont, Magally Torres-Leguizamon, Peggy René-Corail & Jérôme Mathieu
Landscape features are known to alter the spatial genetic variation of aboveground organisms. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the genetic structure of belowground organisms also responds to landscape structure. Microsatellite markers were used to carry out a landscape genetic study of two endogeic earthworm species, Allolobophora chlorotica (N = 440, eight microsatellites) and Aporrectodea icterica (N = 519, seven microsatellites), in an agricultural landscape in the North of France, where landscape features were characterized...

Data from: ClonEstiMate, a Bayesian method for quantifying rates of clonality of populations genotyped at two-time steps

Ronan Becheler, Jean-Pierre Masson, Sophie Arnaud-Haond, Fabien Halkett, Stéphanie Mariette, Marie-Laure Guillemin, Myriam Valero, Christophe Destombe & Solenn Stoeckel
Partial clonality is commonly used in Eukaryotes and has large consequences for their evolution and ecology. Assessing accurately the relative importance of clonal versus sexual reproduction matters for studying and managing such species. Here, we proposed a Bayesian approach, ClonEstiMate, to infer rates of clonality c from populations sampled twice over a short time interval, ideally one generation time. The method relies on the likelihood of the transitions between genotype frequencies of ancestral and descendent...

Data from: Multi-scale drivers of community diversity and composition across tidal heights: an example on temperate seaweed communities

Marine Robuchon, Myriam Valero, Eric Thiébaut & Line Le Gall
1. Despite recent advances in understanding community assembly processes, appreciating how these processes vary across multiple spatial scales and environmental gradients remains a crucial issue in ecology. 2. This study aimed to disentangle the drivers of diversity and composition of seaweed communities through a gradient of spatial scales based on a hierarchical sampling design consisting of 19 sites distributed in four sectors along the Brittany coastline. Using randomised community matrices and Moran’s eigenvector maps (MEMs),...

Data from: The rate of evolution of postmating-prezygotic reproductive isolation in Drosophila

David A Turissini, Joseph A. McGirr, Sonali S. Patel, Jean R. David & Daniel R. Matute
Reproductive isolation (RI) is an intrinsic aspect of species, as described in the Biological Species Concept. For that reason, the identification of the precise traits and mechanisms of RI, and the rates at which they evolve, is crucial to understanding how species originate and persist. Nonetheless, precise measurements of the magnitude of reproductive isolation are rare. Previous work has measured the rates of evolution of prezygotic and postzygotic barriers to gene flow, yet no systematic...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    23

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    23

Affiliations

  • Sorbonne University
    23
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • Evolutionary Biology and Ecology of Algae
    3
  • Centre national de la recherche scientifique
    2
  • University Austral de Chile
    2
  • Paris Diderot University
    2
  • College of Charleston
    1
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • University of Alabama at Birmingham
    1
  • University of Liège
    1