7 Works

Data from: Below-ground resource partitioning alone cannot explain the biodiversity–ecosystem function relationship: a field test using multiple tracers

Annette Jesch, Kathryn E. Barry, Janneke M. Ravenek, Dörte Bachmann, Tanja Strecker, Alexandra Weigelt, Nina Buchmann, Hans De Kroon, Arthur Gessler, Liesje Mommer, Christiane Roscher & Michael Scherer-Lorenzen
1. Belowground resource partitioning is among the most prominent hypotheses for driving the positive biodiversity-ecosystem function relationship. However, experimental tests of this hypothesis in biodiversity experiments are scarce, and the available evidence is not consistent. 2. We tested the hypothesis that resource partitioning in space, in time, or in both space and time combined drives the positive effect of diversity on both plant productivity and community resource uptake. At the community level, we predicted that...

Data from: Plant population success across urban ecosystems – a framework to inform biodiversity conservation in cities

Ingo Kowarik & Moritz Von Der Lippe
1. In a rapidly urbanising world, the ability of plant species to survive and build self-sustaining populations in urban environments is increasingly important for biodiversity conservation. Yet the contribution of cities to biodiversity conservation remains unclear because ecologists have studied biodiversity patterns, largely without considering the population establishment of plants and the ways in which different kinds of urban ecosystems harbour native and endangered plant species. These limitations can mislead conservation policies for cities. 2....

Data from: Intraspecific trait variation increases species diversity in a trait-based grassland model

Michael Crawford, Florian Jeltsch, Felix May, Volker Grimm & Ulrike E. Schlägel
Intraspecific trait variation (ITV) is thought to play a significant role in community assembly, but the magnitude and direction of its influence are not well understood. Although it may be critical to better explain population persistence, species interactions, and therefore biodiversity patterns, manipulating ITV in experiments is challenging. We therefore incorporated ITV into a trait- and individual-based model of grassland community assembly by adding variation to the plants’ functional traits, which then drive life-history trade-offs....

Data from: Demography and selection shape transcriptomic divergence in field crickets

Thomas Blankers, Sibelle Torres Vilaça, Isabelle Waurick, David A. Gray, R. Matthias Hennig, Camilla J. Mazzoni, Frieder Mayer & Emma L. Berdan
Gene flow, demography, and selection can result in similar patterns of genomic variation and disentangling their effects is key to understanding speciation. Here, we assess transcriptomic variation to unravel the evolutionary history of Gryllus rubens and G. texensis, cryptic field cricket species with highly divergent mating behavior. We infer their demographic history and screen their transcriptomes for footprints of selection in the context of the inferred demography. We find strong support for a long history...

Data from: Spatial and topical imbalances in biodiversity research

Laura Tydecks, Jonathan Jeschke, Max Wolf, Gabriel Singer, Klement Tockner & Jonathan M. Jeschke
The rapid erosion of biodiversity is among the biggest challenges human society is facing. Concurrently, major efforts are in place to quantify changes in biodiversity, to understand the consequences for ecosystem functioning and human wellbeing, and to develop sustainable management strategies. Based on comprehensive bibliometric analyses covering 134,321 publications, we report systematic spatial biases in biodiversity-related research. Research is dominated by wealthy countries, while major research deficits occur in regions with disproportionately high biodiversity as...

Data from: How traffic facilitates population expansion of invasive species along roads: the case of common ragweed in Germany

Andreas Lemke, Ingo Kowarik & Moritz Von Der Lippe
1. Because common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L., henceforth Ambrosia) has negative effects on human health, it is a common focus for management, which would benefit from a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms by which the species spreads. Road systems are known to be invasion corridors, but the conduit function of vehicles for the rapid spread of Ambrosia along roads and for population extension along roadside verges has not yet been demonstrated convincingly. 2. To...

Data from: Intransitive competition is common across five major taxonomic groups and is driven by productivity, competitive rank and functional traits.

Santiago Soliveres, Anika Lehmann, Steffen Boch, Florian Altermatt, Francesco Carrara, Thomas W. Crowther, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, Anne Kempel, Daniel S. Maynard, Matthias C. Rillig, Brajesh K. Singh, Pankaj Trivedi & Eric Allan
1. Competition can be fully hierarchical or intransitive, and this degree of hierarchy is driven by multiple factors, including environmental conditions, the functional traits of the species involved or the topology of competition networks. Studies simultaneously analyzing these drivers of competition hierarchy are rare. Additionally, organisms compete either directly or via interference competition for resources or space, within a local neighbourhood or across the habitat. Therefore, the drivers of competition could change accordingly and depend...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • Berlin Brandenburg Institute of Advanced Biodiversity Research
    7
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    2
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2
  • Freie Universität Berlin
    2
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    2
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
    2
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    1
  • Humboldt University of Berlin
    1
  • Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries
    1
  • University of Gothenburg
    1